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Full text of "Bulletin of the State Normal and Industrial College"

Vol. IV MAY, 1914 No. 1 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

North Carolina State Normal 
and Industrial College 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 

BY THE 

North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College, Greensboro, N. C. 



W. C. SMITH, Editor 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1913-1914 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofstaten19131914 



Every human being has a claim to a judicious develop- 
ment of his faculties by those to whom the care of his 
infancy is confided. The mother is qualified, and quali- 
fied by the Creator himself, to become the principal 
agent in the development of her child; * * and 
what is demanded of her is— a thinking love. 

Pestaloztsi. 



The North Carolina State Normal and 
Industrial College 



IDEAS FOR WHICH THE COLLEGE STANDS 

THE State Normal and Industrial College stands for a 
public school system that will educate all the people. It 
teaches its students and urges them to teach others the 
doctrine of universal education. The authorities of the Institu- 
tion regard the College as a part of the public school system of 
the State, and believe that it has a duty to discharge, not only 
to those who study within its walls, but to that great body of 
people who will not enter this or any other school or college. 
The greatest amount of educational opportunity to the greatest 
number of people is its motto and its aim. Without reserva- 
tion, members of its faculty stand for local taxation for public 
schools, and for every movement which tends to secure to the 
state effective teaching for every child, preparing him for pro- 
ductive labor and intelligent citizenship. 

The Institution undertakes to emphasize in every legitimate 
way that any system of education which refuses to recognize 
the equal educational rights of women with those of men is 
unjust, unwise, and permanently hurtful. One-third of the pop- 
ulation of North Carolina is composed of women and girls of 
the white race, and the opportunities given to this class of our 
population will determine North Carolina's destiny. The chief 
factors of any civilization are its homes and its primary schools. 
Homes and primary schools are made by women rather than 
by men. No state which will once educate its mothers need 
have any fear about future illiteracy. — Charles Duncan Mclver. 



CONTENTS 



Ideas for which the College Stands 4 

Calendars 6-7 

Board of Directors 8 

Faculty 9-14 

Officers 15 

Important Directions 17 

Establishment 18 

Purpose, Organization, and History 19 

Admission Requirements and Examinations 21-32 

Courses Leading to Degrees 34-39 

Regulations 34 

Courses of Study, Special and Elective 40 

Summer Session Courses 41 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 43-91 

Extension Department 90 

County Appointments 92 

Applications for County Appointments 93 

Expenses for Annual Session 95-97 

Expenses for Summer Session : 98 

Free Tuition ." 99 

Loan Funds and Fellowships 100 

Government 102 

Contract 102 

Examinations and Reports 103 

Location and Accessibility 104 

Equipment, Grounds, and Buildings 105 

Social Life 109 

Religious Life 109 

General Culture 110 

Service Rendered by the College 112 

Extension Work 90 and 113 

Health and Medical Attention 113 

Some Distinctive Features 115 

Organizations 116 

College Publications 119 

Teachers' Registry 120 

Alumnae Association 121 

Students 122 

Summer Session Students 136 

Institute Students 142 

Summary 145 

Summary by Counties 145 

Scope of Patronage 146 

Commencement Exercises, 1913 147 

Degrees Conferred, 1913 148 

List of Graduates 150 

Standing Committees of Faculty 165 

Index 



1914 


JANUARY, 1914 


MAY, 1914 


SEPTEMBER, 1914 


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FEBRUARY, 1914 


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COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1914-1915 



1914 — September 16. Wednesday — 

Examinations begin. 

For New Students: 

Eegistration. 

Entrance Examinations. 

Examinations for Advanced Standing. 

For Former Students: 

Examinations for Eemoval of Conditions. 
Examinations for Advanced Standing. 

September 19. Saturday — 

Examinations end. 

Registration of Former Students. 

Eegistration of Students who enter by Certificate. 

September 21. Monday — 

Eegular College Work begins. 

October 5. Pounder's Day. 

November 26. Thursday — Thanksgiving — Holiday. 

Christmas — 

Eeeess from Dec. 23 to Jan. 4, inclusive. 
1915 — January 25. Monday — 

Spring Term begins. 
February 22. Washington's Birthday — Holiday. 
April 23. Friday — 

Field Day. 

May 22, 23, 24, 25. Saturday, Sunday, Monday, and 
Tuesday — 

Commencement Exercises. 
June 1. Tuesday — 

Summer Session begins. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



t T. B. Bailey Davie County 

* A. J. Conner Northampton County 

t Gr. W. Hinshaw Forsyth County 

* E. E. Britton Wake County 

J. Y. Joyner Guilford County 

X C. H. Mebane Catawba County 

X J. D. Murphy Buncombe County 

* J. L. Nelson Caldwell County 

X Walker Taylor New Hanover County 

t T. S. McMullan Perquimans County 

* Joe Rosenthal Wayne County 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 



J. Y. Joyner, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Ex- officio, President 

A. J. Conner, Secretary 

E. J. Forney, Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



T. B. Bailey, Chairman 
G. W. Hinshaw J. D. Murphy J. Y. Joyner 



t Term expires March 1, 1916. 
* Term expires March 1, 1920. 
X Term expires March 1, 1918. 



FACULTY 



JULIUS I. FOUST, LL.D. 

President 

WILLIAM C. SMITH, Ph. B. 

English Language and Literature 

JUNIUS A. MATHESON, A. B. 
Pedagogy 

GERTRUDE W. MENDENHALL, B. S. 
Mathematics 

EUGENE W. GUDGER, M. S., Ph. D. 
Biology and Geology 

* ANNA M. GOVE, M. D. 
Physiology and Hygiene 

WILLIAM C. A. HAMMEL 
Physics and Manual Arts 

MARY M. PETTY, B. S. 

Chemistry 

MARY SETTLE SHARPE 

Expression 

VIOLA BODDIE 

Latin 

HINDA TEAGUE HILL, A. B. 

French 

WALTER CLINTON JACKSON, B. S. 
History and Economics 



On leave of absence. 



10 The State Normal 



FACULTY— Continued 



WADE R. BROWN 
Piano, Organ and Theory 

CHARLES J. BROCKMANN 
Stringed Instruments and Piano 

MELVILLE VINCENT FORT 
Industrial Drawing and Art 

MINNIE L. JAMISON 
Domestic Science 

E. J. FORNEY 
Stenography, Typewriting and Bookkeeping 

ROBERT A. MERRITT, A. B. 
Psychology and History of Education 

ALMA I. LONG 
Domestic Art 

E. E. BALCOMB, A. B. 
Agriculture and Rural Economics 

LAURA McALLESTER 
Physical Culture 

GRACE HUSE, A. B., M. D. 
Physiology and Hygiene 

CHRISTINE R. A. REINCKEN 
German 

JULIA M. RAINES 
Associate in Manual Arts 



and Industrial College 11 



FACULTY— Continued 



CORA STRONG, A. B. 

Associate in Mathematics 

MARTHA ELIZABETH WINFIELD 
Associate in English 

* VIRGINIA RAGSDALE, Ph. D. 
Associate in Mathematics 

JULIA DAMERON, A. M. 
Associate in Latin 

EVA MAY BRYAN, A.M. 

Associate in French 

MYRA ALDERMAN ALBRIGHT 
Piano 

EMMA KING, A. B. 

Instructor in English 

NETTIE LEETE PARKER 
Instructor in Mathematics 

ANNIE F. PETTY 
Library Methods 

MARY ROBINSON 
Instructor in Biology 

* MAY McLELLAND 

Instructor in English 



On leave of absence. 



12 The State Normal 



FACULTY— Continued 



MARY BALDWIN MITCHELL, A. B. 

Instructor in Latin 

MARY KING DANIEL, B. S. 
Instructor in English 

MARY D. TYLER 

Instructor in History 

ELEANORE ELLIOTT 

Instructor in English 

ETHEL LEWIS HARRIS 

Instructor in School Music 

KATHRYN M. SEVERSON 
Instructor in Voice Culture 

CLARA BOOTH BYRD, A. B. 

Instructor in Commercial Department 

PATTIE McADAMS 

Instructor in Hygiene 

HARRIET WISEMAN ELLIOTT, A. M. 

Instructor in History 

ETHEL GARDNER 

Instructor in Piano 

EMMA R. LITTLE 
Instructor in French 

ELIZABETH BARTLETT POTWINE, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 



AND INDUSTKIAL COLLEGE 13 



FACULTY— Continued 



SUSIE EASTIN PURVIS, B. S. 
Instructor in English 

SALLY SMITH NEAL 
Instructor in English 

GERTRUDE SOUSLEY 
Instructor in Piano 

META SCHMIDT, A. B. 

Instructor in German 

BHODA BAXTER 
Instructor in Physical Culture 

BEETHA STANBURY 

Instructor in Mathematics 

ALLIENE RICHARD MINOR 

Instructor in Piano 

* IOLA V. EXUM 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

LIZZIE McIVER WEATHERSPOON 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

ETTA R. SPIER 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

IONE H. DUNN 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 



* On leave of absence. 



14 The State Normal 



FACULTY— Continued 



RUTH FITZGERALD 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

SUE NASH 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

ANNA MEADE MICHAUX 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

JANE SUMMERELL, A. B. 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

MATTIE E. WILLIAMS 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

EUNICE ANDERSON 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

ETHEL L. BROWN 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

R. D. W. CONNOR 
Lecturer in North Carolina History 

JAMES F. CONNOLLY, A.M. 
Pedagogy 

J. HENRY HIGHSMITH 
Pedagogy (Summer Session) 

FRANCES V. WOMBLE 
High School Visit or 



and Industrial College 3 5 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION 



JULIUS I. FOUST, LL.D. 

President 



WILLIAM C. SMITH, Ph. B. 
Dean of the Faculty 

JUNIUS A. MATHESON, A. B. 
Dean of the College 

SUE MAY KIRKLAND 
Lady Principal 

* ANNA M. GOVE, M. D. 
Physician 

GRACE HUSE, M. D. 
Physician 

E. J. FORNEY 
Bursar 

LAURA H. COIT 

Secretary 

MARY TAYLOR MOORE 
Registrar 

ESTELLE BOYD 
Housekeeper 

EDITH LMES 
Dietitian 



On leave of absence. 



16 The State Normal 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION— Continued 



JANE T. MILLEE, A. B. 
General Secretary Y. W. C. A. 

ANNIE F. PETTY 

Librarian 

MAEY MULLEN 

Assistant Librarian 

MAEY TENNENT, B. P. 
Assistant Registrar 

OELAND WASHBUEN 

Stenographer 

NAN McAEN 
Stenographer 

PATTIE McADAMS 

Trained Nurse 

ELIZA N. WOOLAED 
Assistant Nurse 



and Industrial College 17 

IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS 



1. The attention of the student is directed to the College 
calendar. See page seven of this catalogue. 

2. When application is made for admission, the applicant 
should not fail to give her county. 

3. Special attention is called to the article on "Require- 
ments for Admission." See pages 21-30. 

4. The expenses, with dates of advance quarterly payments, 
are given on pages 95-98. 

5. The rooms in the dormitories have been comfortably 
fitted up, and the beds have good springs and mattresses. 
Each student is expected to bring for her own use the follow- 
ing articles: One pillow and two pairs of pillowcases, two 
pairs of sheets, two pairs of blankets, two counterpanes, six 
towels and six table napkins; one spoon, knife, and glass for 
individual use in room. Only single teds are used. 

Each student is expected to be provided with overshoes 
and an umbrella plainly marked with her full name; also a 
coat, or raincoat, for protection during stormy weather. 

6. Every applicant for admission to the College who has 
not already been successfully vaccinated within two years, 
should be vaccinated at least two weeks before leaving home. 
In any case she must either send her certificate of vaccination 
by mail or bring it with her when she enters the College. 

7. Every student, upon arrival at the College, is required 
to purchase a gymnasium outfit, costing $6.00. These outfits 
may not be provided at home, but must be purchased under the 
direction of the Instructor in Physical Training. 

8. If, after examining this catalogue carefully, further 
information is desired, address Julius I. Foust, President, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



The 

State Normal and Industrial 

College 



ESTABLISHMENT 

Established by act of the General Assembly of 
1891, the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial 
College first opened its doors for the reception of stu- 
dents October 5th, 1892. More than to any other one 
man the Institution owes its existence to Charles Dun- 
can Mclver. He formulated the ideas which it em- 
bodies and was chiefly instrumental in securing the 
passage of an act establishing it. During the fifteen 
years of his presidency he so laid its foundations 
and outlined its future growth that the College must 
ever remain a monument to his statesmanship. It 
was his idea that the State of North Carolina should 
provide for its young women an institution of higher 
learning adequate for every need and within the 
reach of all. Soundly progressive in spirit, it was to 
be helpful in aim and endeavor. Equality of oppor- 
tunity and fitness for service were to be its watch- 
words — earnest living and high thinking its ideals. 
Only thus could it justify its existence or merit the 
continued support of an intelligent people. 



and Industrial College 11* 



PURPOSE, ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY 

The chief mission of the College has been and will 
continue to be the preparation of teachers. At least 
two-thirds of all its enrolled students and nine-tenths 
of all its graduates render service in either the public 
or private schools of North Carolina. Many of the 
courses, therefore, are designed particularly for 
teachers. For students who may not wish to teach 
and who must yet look to their own efforts for a liveli- 
hood, instruction is offered in the commercial branches, 
drawing, industrial art, domestic science, and other 
subjects — the mastery of which will enable them to 
become self-supporting. The College realizes, how- 
ever, that not all who seek an education do so with a 
desire to become teachers or from motives of self- 
support. For that considerable body of women who 
seek the broad culture to be derived from a familiarity 
with the world 's best thought and achievement, liberal 
courses in the arts, sciences, and music are offered — 
the Institution thus endeavoring to meet the needs of 
the women of North Carolina and to give such educa- 
tion as will add to the efficiency of the average 
woman's work whatever her position and field of 
labor. 

The management of the College is vested in a 
Board of Directors, consisting of one member from 
each of the Congressional districts, the first Board 
being elected by the General Assembly of 1891. The 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction is, ex- 
ojficio, an additional member of the Board, and its 
President. 

The act establishing the Institution required that 
it be located at some suitable place, where the citi- 



20 The State Normal 

zens would furnish the necessary buildings or money 
sufficient to erect them. The Board of Directors ac- 
cepted the offer made by the City of Greensboro, which 
was $30,000 in money, voted by the town, and a beau- 
tiful ten-acre site, located in the corporate limits, and 
donated by Messrs. K, S. Pullen, R. T. Gray, E. P. 
Wharton, and others. Since the original donation the 
Directors have purchased about 116 acres of land. 

In October, 1892, the College began its work with 
two buildings inadequately equipped, an annual ap- 
propriation of $10,000 for maintenance, a teaching 
force of fifteen, and a student enrollment of two hun- 
dred and twenty-three. The people, regardless of 
denominational or party affiliations, have stood loyally 
by their College, and each succeeding Legislature has 
dealt more and more liberally with it. Today the 
Institution has fifteen buildings; 106 lecture rooms, 
laboratories, and offices; dormitory accommodations 
for 550 boarders; a teaching and official force of 70; 
and, including the Training School, a total enrolment 
of 1284 students. The value of the plant is $685,000, 
and the annual State appropriation is $95,000. 



and Industrial College 21 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 



The Normal and Industrial College is a part of the 
public school system, and its special mission is to pre- 
pare people to work in and improve that system. As 
a State institution, it desires to be of the greatest pos- 
sible service to the entire people of North Carolina. 
It would not, if it could, limit its patronage to a 
particular class or section. Every county has its pro- 
portionate number of appointments and the advan- 
tages of the Institution are, to the extent of its capac- 
ity, open on similar terms to all. Its requirements 
for admission and its courses of study have been made 
equivalent to those of the colleges of best standing in 
North Carolina. Local conditions, however, have not 
been overlooked, and the work offered in the Freshman 
year is of such a nature that it may be profitably 
begun by any intelligent girl who has improved all 
her opportunities in the best public high schools of 
the State. For the benefit of those young women who 
find it impossible to secure proper preparation in all 
the subjects required for entrance, the Institution 
offers preparatory instruction in some of the units 
required for admission to the Freshman class. 

No students are admitted, however, who have not 
completed the course in the home school. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

1. Applicants for admission to the College should 
be sixteen years old and in good health. 

2. They should send with their applications, which 
they themselves must write, a statement from their 



22 The State Normal 

last teacher as to scholarship, conduct, and habits of 
study. 

3. The standard of admission to the College is the 
prescribed course of the State High Schools of North 
Carolina. When these schools are thoroughly organ- 
ized their graduates should be able to offer fourteen 
units of work for college entrance. The Normal Col- 
lege, however, is much more concerned about the qual- 
ity of the preparatory work than it is about the quan- 
tity. Until it finds, therefore, that its candidates for 
admission can offer more, it will admit to the Fresh- 
man class those students who can give evidence of hav- 
ing had thorough preparation in twelve and one-half 
units of High School work. The term unit means the 
equivalent of five recitations a week for one year in 
one branch of study. Students are admitted to the 
Freshman class (1) by passing satisfactory examina- 
tions; or (2) on the presentation of a diploma from 
a recognized college; or (3) on the presentation of 
proper certificates from an accredited high school. 

The admission subjects and their requirements are 
as follows : 

1. Eleven and one-half required units, including 
two and one-half units in Mathematics, three in Eng- 
lish, two in History, one in Science, and three in for- 
eign languages — Latin, French or German. 

2. One elective unit from the following: Latin 
or French or German — subject to the restriction that 
not more than a total of three units in any one lan- 
guage will be accepted — or Science or History. 

The requirements in each of these subjects are as 
follows : 



and Industrial College 23 

Mathematics: 2% units. 

Algebra: Factors, common divisors and multiples, 
fractions, simple equations with applications to prob- 
lems, involution and evolution, radicals and equa- 
tions containing radicals, imaginaries, quadratic equa- 
tions, ratio and proportion, arithmetical and geometri- 
cal progressions, binominal theorem for positive inte- 
gral exponents. 

Geometry: Plane Geometry, five books. In order 
that students may pursue successfully the work of 
the Freshman year, it is strongly recommended that 
their preparation in Algebra include frequent supple- 
mentary exercises taken from various text-books, and 
in Geometry constant practice with original demon- 
strations. During the year before entrance to Col- 
lege there should be a review of both subjects. 

One and one-half years with daily recitations is the 
shortest time in which satisfactory preparation can be 
made in Algebra, and one year with daily recitations 
is the minimum in Geometry. 

History: 2 units. The requirements in History 
may be met by offering two of the following courses. 
The examinations will be based on the material in- 
cluded in the books suggested, or their equivalent. 

1. American History. Hart's Essentials of American 
History; McLaughlin's History of the American Nation. 

2. English History. Montgomery's English History; 
Coman & Kendall's History of England; Cheyney's History of 
England. 

3. Ancient History (Greece and Eome). West's Ancient 
History; Botsford's History of the Ancient World; Myers' 
Ancient History. 



24 The State Normal 



4. Mediaeval and Modern History. Myers' Mediaeval and 
Modem History; Bourne's Mediaeval and Modern History; 
West's Modern History. 

One elective unit may be offered from this group. 

English: 3 units. The requirement in English 
is that agreed upon by a joint committee of colleges 
and secondary schools and now generally accepted by 
all colleges in the United States. Of this require- 
ment, the following is a general definition : 

A. English Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric. 

To test the candidate 's command of clear and accu- 
rate English, she will be required to write one or more 
compositions, developing a theme through several para- 
graphs. The subjects will be drawn from the books 
prescribed for study and from the student's personal 
knowledge and experience. 

To meet the requirements in Composition : 

1. There should be practice in writing equivalent to weekly 
or at least fortnightly themes throughout the High School 
course. The subjects for themes should be drawn partly from 
the literature read and partly from the student's daily expe- 
rience and observation. The candidate should be well grounded 
in the essentials of English Grammar, and accuracy in spelling, 
capitalization, and punctuation should be rigorously exacted. 
Proper effort should also be made to enlarge the student's 
vocabulary. 

2. The theory of Ehetoric should be studied in connection 
with the work in composition. The pupil should study the struc- 
ture of sentences, paragraphs, and whole compositions; should 
analyze and make outlines of essays with a view to understand- 
ing the orderly and progressive development of thought, and 
should be taught the principles of good writing as exemplified 
both in her own work and in the work of others. 



and Industrial College 25 



B. Beading and Practice. 

A certain number of books will be set for reading. 
The aim of this course is to foster in the student 
the habit of intelligent reading and to develop a taste 
for good literature. She should read the books care- 
fully, but her attention should not be so fixed upon 
details that she fails to appreciate the main purpose 
and charm of what she reads. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence 
of a general knowledge of the subject-matter, and to 
answer simple questions on the lives of the authors. 
The form of examination will usually be the writing 
of a paragraph or two on each of several topics, to be 
chosen by the candidate from a considerable number 
set before her in the examination paper. 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books 
provided for reading are arranged in the following 
groups, from which at least ten units, — not less than 
two from each group, — are to be selected. 

I. Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Midsummer Night's 
Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Henry the Fifth, 
Julus Caesar. 

II. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's Vicar of 
Wakefield; either Scott's Ivanhoe or Scott's Quentin Durward; 
Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables; either Dickens' David 
Copperfield, or Dickens' Tale of Two Cities; Thackeray's 
Henry Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; George Eliot's Silas 
Marner ; Stevenson's Treasure Island. 

III. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I; The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Franklin's Autobiography 
(condensed); Irving 's Sketch Book; Macaulay's Essays on 
Lord Clive and Warren Hastings; Thackeray's English Humor- 
ists; Parkman's Oregon Trail; either Thoreau's Walden or 
Huxley's Autobiography and selections from Lay Sermons, 
including the addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A 
Liberal Education, and A Piece of Chalk; Stevenson's Inland 
Voyage and Travels with a Donkey. 



26 The State Normal 

IV. Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II 
and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cow- 
per, and Burns; Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard, and 
Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner, 
and Lowell 's Vision of Sir Launfal ; Scott 's Lady of the LaJce ; 
Byron's Childe Harold, Canto IV, and Prisoner of Chillon; 
Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with 
especial attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; Poe's 
Eaven; Longfellow's Courtship of Miles Standish, and Whit- 
tier's Snow-Bound; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Borne, and 
Arnold's Sohrab and Bustum; Tennyson's Princess or Gareth 
and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; 
Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, Good News from 
Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts From Abroad, Home Thoughts 
From the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, Herve Biel, Phei- 
dippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down in the City. 

C. Study and Practice. 

This part of the examination presupposes the 
thorough study of each of the works named below. 
The examination will be upon subject-matter, form, 
and structure. 

The books set for this part of the examination are : 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus, L' Allegro and II 
Penseroso, or Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and 
Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Burke's Speech on Concil- 
iation with America, or Washington's Farewell Address and 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of John- 
son, or Carlyle 's Essay on Burns. 

In connection with the two foregoing lists, the stu- 
dent should be trained in reading aloud and encour- 
aged to commit to memory some of the more notable 
passages both in verse and prose. As an aid to literary 
appreciation, she is further advised to acquaint her- 
self with the more important facts in the lives of the 
authors read and with their place in literary history. 
The head of the English Department will be glad 
to recommend suitable text-books for this preparatory 



and Industrial College 27 

work and to furnish needful suggestions looking 
towards the accomplishment of better results. 

Note. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work 
is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, grammar, or divi- 
sion into paragraphs. 

Science: 1 or 2 units. One unit of Science is 
required of all candidates for admission to the Col- 
lege. An additional unit will be accepted. See 
"Electives and Equivalents" below. 

Physical Geography: 1 unit. The text-book 
recommended is Tarr's New Physical Geography, and 
from it the entrance examination will be made out. 
This may be expected to cover such important topics 
as the Land, its physiographic features and the pro- 
cesses which have brought them about; the Ocean, its 
composition, currents, effects on climate, and its shore 
lines with their influence on civilization; the Atmos- 
phere, its movements, weather, and climate ; the distri- 
bution of animals and plants brought about by differ- 
ences of temperature and moisture; and last, the 
Physiography of the United States, and its effects on 
the industries and pursuits of the nation. 

Science : Electives and Equivalents. The out- 
line of the requirement in Physical Geography will 
serve to indicate the character and amount of work 
that must be offered in Science. An equivalent in Agri- 
culture, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, or Physics will 
be accepted. From this group the candidate may also 
offer one elective unit. Accurate notes of all labora- 
tory work should be kept and the note-books presented 
by the candidate at the time of her entrance. 

Foreign Languages: 3 units. The entrance re- 
quirements in foreign languages may be met as fol- 



28 The State Normal 

lows : Three units of Latin, or, two units of Latin and 
one unit of Modern Language (French or German), 
or, three units of Modern Language. Candidates pre- 
senting three units in one language are given freedom 
of choice in the languages later to be pursued. Those 
presenting two languages are required to continue one 
of them. In addition to the three required units in 
foreign languages, the candidate may offer one addi- 
tional unit as an elective. This is subject to the 
restriction that not more than three units will be 
accepted in one language. 

Latin : 2 or 3 units. Two units of Latin must be 
offered for admission to the Freshman class in the 
Bachelor of Arts course and by all candidates who 
elect Latin in any of the other courses. Candidates 
must have had competent instruction in the subject, 
involving the Roman pronunciation, careful attention 
to quantity and accent, systematic drill in grammar 
with daily exercises in prose composition, and the 
reading of some elementary reader, together with four 
books of Caesar's Gallic War, or their equivalent. 
Bennett's Latin Composition, through chapter 27, will 
serve to indicate the amount of composition required. 
Students who wish credit for three units of Latin 
must present, in addition to the foregoing, six of 
Cicero 's orations — the four against Catiline, the Manil- 
ian Law, and Archias. Bennett's Latin Composition 
should be completed. In reading and in composition, 
equivalents satisfactory to the head of the Latin 
Department will be accepted. 



and Industrial College 29 

French: 1, 2 or 3 units. 

I. One Unit. This amount includes: (1) Careful 
drill in pronunciation; (2) rudiments of grammar, 
with particular attention to simple idiomatic con- 
structions, conjugation of the regular, and the more 
common irregular verbs, and the simpler pronominal 
forms; (3) constant practice in the translation from 
English into French; (4) writing French from dicta- 
tion; (5) the reading of from 100 to 175 pages of 
graduated texts, with frequent practice in reproducing 
in French easy variations of the text read. 

II. Two units. In addition to the work of the 
first unit, this demands (1) a continued and thorough 
study of grammar, including the subjunctive and 
infinitive uses, more detailed work in pronominal con- 
structions, and word order, with constant application 
in the construction of sentences; (2) the reading of 
from 300 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form 
of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches ; 
(3) continued practice in translating into French 
variations of the texts read; (4) frequent summaries, 
sometimes oral and sometimes written, of portions of 
the text already read. 

III. Three units. This work comprises in addi- 
tion to I and II the reading of from 400 to 600 pages 
of standard French of increasing difficulty, a portion 
of which should be in dramatic form; the study of a 
grammar of modern completeness; more advanced 
work in translation into French, and free composition ; 
frequent practice in giving French paraphrases, 
abstracts, or reproductions, either oral or written. 



30 The State Normal 

German : 1, 2 or 3 units. 

I. One unit. The student should know the rudi- 
ments of grammar and possess an ability to read 
easy prose at sight and to translate simple English 
sentences into German. She should have read 150 
pages of easy prose. Emphasis is laid on pronuncia- 
tion. 

II. Two units. In addition to the foregoing, this 
requires continued work in advanced grammar and 
composition. The candidate should have read 300 or 
more pages of easy German and should be able to 
translate simple prose and poetry at sight. 

III. Three units. 

The student should be able to translate at sight 
ordinary modern and classical German prose into good 
English. This may be acquired by reading at least 
500 pages of advanced prose and verse selected from 
such works as the following : Freytag, Doktor Luther 
or Aus dem Staat Friedrichs des Grossen; Heine, 
Reisebilder ; Schiller, Wilhelm Tell ; Hoffman, Meister 
Martin, der Kiiffner. Bacon's German Composition, 
or its equivalent, must have been completed. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS— BACHELOR OF 
MUSIC DEGREE 

The general requirements are the same as for 
all regular degree courses in the College. See pages 
21-30. 

Additional Requirements: 

The candidate must possess a knowledge of the 
rudiments of music, scales, intervals, and staff nota- 
tion, including the terms and expression marks in 
common use. 



and Industrial College 31 

In Piano: Combined with the foregoing theory 
requirement. A practical knowledge of the various 
kinds of touch; the ability to play all major and 
minor scales in similar and contrary motion in six- 
teenth notes (at metronome speed of quarter note = 
84) ;the major and minor arpeggios slowly and clearly ; 
the ability to play with due regard to tempo, fingering, 
phrasing and expression, the studies by Heller, Op. 
46; Czerny, Op. 299, Book I; Mozart, Sonata in C, 
No. 1 ; Haydn, Sonata in C ; Grieg, Album Leaf in A, 
Op. 28 ; Bach, Solfeggietto, Dussek Rondo in D ; Mosz- 
kowski, Etude in G. The ability to play at sight 
hymn tunes, chorals, and such pieces as Reinecke, 
Op. 77; Scharwenka, Op. 62; other easy pieces by 
Gurlitt and First Lessons in Bach, Vol. I, edited by 
Carroll, Angener edition. 

A candidate may offer equivalents for the studies 
and pieces mentioned on the approval of the depart- 
ment. 

A preparatory course, the equivalent of the above, 
will take about four years for the ordinary grammar 
grade or high school pupil to complete. 

The following outline is suggested as a suitable 
course to prepare for the entrance to the Freshman 
class : 

First Year : The study of notation, rhythm, sight- 
reading, ear-training, a knowledge of the keyboard, 
muscular control, and finger technic, each taught sep- 
arately at first. 

Simple studies and pieces selected from the fol- 
lowing : 

Chittenden, Five Note Melodies; M. Watson, First Visits 



32 The State Normal 

to Tuneland; Crosby Adams, Primary Tone Pictures; Florence 
Maxim, The Music Ladder; Gurlitt, Melody and Technic, Book 
I. 

Second Year: Studies — Duvernoy, Op. 176; Kohler, Op. 
242; Gurlitt, Op. 187. Pieces — Easy pieces by Lynes, Dutton, 
Krogmann, Dennee, Gurlitt, and others. 

Third Year: Studies — Loeschhorn, Op. 66, Book I; Brauer, 
Op. IS; First Lessons in Bach, Carroll. Pieces — Sonatinas by 
Clementi and Kuhlau. Pieces by Keinecke, Schytte, Tschai- 
kowsky, Heller, and others. 

Fourth Year: Studies — Duvernoy, Op. 120; Heller, Op. 
46; E. B. Perry, Wrist Studies; Czerny, Op. 299, Books I and 
II. Pieces — Mozart, Sonata in C; Haydn, Sonata in C. 
Pieces by Jensen, von Wilm, Schumann, Grieg, and others. 

In Organ : Those seeking admission to the organ 
department must have completed the work of the 
Freshman year in piano. The organ course covers 
three years. 

In Violin : Candidates to enter the violin course 
must add to the regular College entrance require- 
ments a knowledge of the general musical theory and 
an ability to play correctly selections from the Wichtl 
School Book I, and from Kayser, Thirty -Six Studies, 
Book I, or other works of same standard and difficulty. 

In Voice: Applicants for the regular course in 
voice must add to the regular College entrance require- 
ments the ability to play simple piano accompaniments 
readily. 

TIME AND PLACE OF EXAMINATIONS 

All candidates for admission into the College who 
have entrance examinations to stand must assemble in 
the College chapel at 9 :00 a. m., Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 16th, for preliminary registration. They will 
there be assigned to rooms for examination. 



and Industrial College 33 

Former students who have no examinations to 
stand and new students who are to enter on certificate 
must present themselves for registration on Saturday 
morning, September 19th. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates for admission to an advanced class are 
subject to examinations on all studies required for 
admission to the Freshman class, and on all studies 
pursued by the class up to the point at which they 
enter. Such candidates should present themselves for 
examination on the same days and at the same hours 
with candidates for admission into the Freshman class. 
(See College Calendar, page 7.) 

No student will be permitted to pass by examina- 
tion all language work required in any course, but 
must take at least one vear in residence. 



34 The State Normal 

COURSES OF STUDY 



COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES 

The College offers five general courses of study- 
leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of Peda- 
gogy, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor 
of Science in Home Economics, and Bachelor of Music. 
All students receiving free tuition appointments must 
take one of these regular degree courses or the brief 
course for teachers outlined on page 40. 

REGULATIONS 

No student may register for more than sixteen periods a 
week, except under such regulations as are adopted by the 
Faculty Council. All students are required to take at least 
twelve periods of work. 

The work in a lower class must be completed before the work 
in the same subject can be taken in a higher class. In case of 
conflict between work in a lower class in any department and 
the work in a higher class in another department, the student 
must drop the work of the higher class. 

Satisfactory examinations on all back work must be passed 
at the beginning of the session. Seniors receiving a failure 
or more than one condition at mid-year examinations are no 
longer to be considered members of the class, and will be 
required to discontinue some of their work. 

No first year language may count as Senior work. 

Petitions for change of course must be submitted during 
the last two weeks of April or during the first week of the fall 
term. Final choice of subjects for students' programs must 
be made by the second Wednesday of the fall term. 

An entrance condition, no matter how slight, prevents a 
student from being classed higher than a Freshman. Any defi- 
ciency in Freshman work prevents a student from being classed 
as a Junior. 



and Industrial College 



35 



COUESE I.— BACHELOR OF PEDAGOGY 



This course is designed particularly for those who intend 
to teach. It differs from the other courses chiefly in permit- 
ting a more liberal choice of subjects relating to public school 
work and in allotting double time to the Pedagogy of the 
Senior year. Freedom of choice is allowed in the elective 
subjects of the Senior year, provided that the necessary pre- 
paratory work has been done by the proper election in previous 
years. 

Numerals indicate number of recitations one hour in length 
in each subject weekly. 



FRESHMAN 

English 3 

Latin, or 
French, or 

German 4 

Mathematics 4 

Vocal Music, or 

Expression 2 

* Biology and Botany, or 
Drawing 2 



15 



SOPHOMOEE 

English 3 

Latin, or 
French, or 

German 3 

Mathematics, or 

History 3 

Chemistry 3 

Dom. Sci. and Dom. Art 

or 
Drawing, or 
Physiography 3 

or 
Second Language 4 

15 or 16 



JUNIOR 

English 3 

Latin, French, or 

German 3 

Psychology 3 

Physics 3 

Rural Economics, or 
History of Education, or 
History, or 
Mathematics, or 
Language, or 
Biology, or 

Economics 3 

Manual Arts 1 

16 



SENIOR 

English 3 

Pedagogy 6 

Mathematics IV, or V, or 
Biology, or 
Chemistry, or 
Physiology, or 
Physics, or 
Economics, or 

Astronomy 3 

History, or 

Language 3 

Manual Arts 1 



16 



Biology and Botany is a prerequisite for Domestic Science. 



36 



The State Normal 



COURSE II.— BACHELOR OF ARTS 

This course is designed particularly for those who may wish 
to give special attention to the languages. Students who are 
under pledge to teach, are required to take three additional 
periods of practice work in the Training School. 

Numerals indicate number of recitations one hour in length 
in each subject weekly. 



FRESHMAN 

English 3 

Latin 4 

French or German 4 

Mathematics 4 



15 



SOPHOMORE 

English 3 

Latin 3 

French or German 3 

Chemistry 3 

Mathematics or History. .3 

or French or German .... 4 
(A third lang.) 

15 or 16 



JUNIOR 

English 3 

Latin 3 

French or German 3 

Psychology 3 

Physics or History, or 

Mathematics or Language 3 

Expression 1 

16 



SENIOR 

English 3 

Latin 3 

French or German 3 

Mathematics or History . . 3 
Pedagogy or Language, or 

Economics 3 



15 



and Industrial College 



37 



COURSE in.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

This course is designed particularly for those who may wish 
to give special attention to science. Students who are under 
pledge to teach are required to take three additional periods of 
practice work in the Training School. 

Numerals indicate number of recitations one hour in length 
in each subject weekly. 



FRESHMAN 

English 3 

Latin or French 

or German 4 

Mathematics 4 

Drawing 2 

Biology and 

Botany 2 



15 



SOPHOMOEE 

English 3 

Latin, or 

French or German 3 

Mathematics, or 

History 3 

Chemistry 3 

Second Language 4 

or Physiography, or 
Physics 1 3 

15 or 16 



JUNIOR 

English 3 

Biology 3 

Psychology 3 

Physics 3 

Language, or 
History, or 

Mathematics 3 

Expression 1 



16 



SENIOR 



English 3 

Chemistry 



■ any two 6 



Biology III 
Physics 
Astronomy, or 
Physiology 
Mathematics, or 

History 3 

Science, or 

Language, or 

Pedagogy, or 

Economics 3 

15 



38 



The State Normal 



COURSE IV.— BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This course is designed for those who intend to pursue 
a musical education. Special attention is given in the Junior 
and Senior years to the preparation for teaching either Applied 
Music or Public School Music, or both. 

For admission to the " Music Course' ' a student must pre- 
sent the regular college entrance requirements and, in addition, 
the equivalent of four years' preparatory work in music. An 
outline of these additional requirements is given in this cata- 
logue, pages 30-32. 

The attention of the student is called to the fact that there 
are extra charges in the " Music Course". For tuition expen- 
ses in this department see page 97. 

Numerals indicate number of recitations one hour in length 
in each subject weekly. 



FRESHMAN 

English 3 

German or French 4 

Solfeggio 3 

Applied Music (Piano, 

Voice, or Violin) 5 



15 



SOPHOMORE 

English 3 

German or French 3 

Harmony 2 

History of Music 2 

Applied Music 5 

Solo Class > ^ 

Ensemble Playing / " 

16 

SENIOR 

Applied Music 6 

Counterpoint 2 

Analysis 2 

Public School Music 3 

or 
Voice, or 
Violin, or 
Organ, or 
Piano, or 
English, or 

Third Yr. Mod. Lang . . .3 
Piano Teaching 2 

or 
Voice, or 
Organ, or 
Piano, or 
Violin, or 

Junior Literature 2 

Solo and Ensemble 1 

16 



JUNIOR 

Psychology 3 

Harmony 2 

History of Music 2 

Solo Class \ j 

Ensemble Playing J " 

Applied Music 6 

Normal Piano Methods, or 

Voice, or 

Organ, or 

Piano, or 

Violin, or 

Junior Literature 2 



16 



and Industrial College 



39 



COURSE V.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME 
ECONOMICS 

This course is designed particularly for those who wish 
a liberal and at the same time thorough course in the arts 
and sciences which are fundamental in the management of the 
home. The College is provided with all the necessary furnish- 
ings and apparatus to give thorough instruction in the subjects 
of house management and sanitation, art and design, food 
preparation, dietetics, textiles and house decoration. 

Numerals indicate number of recitations one hour in length 
in each subject weekly. 



FRESHMAN 

English 3 

Language 4 

Mathematics 4 

Chemistry 3 

Rural Economics I 1 



15 



SOPHOMORE 

English 3 

Language 3 

Dom. Science — 2nd term 1 ~ 
Dom. Art — 1st term / 
House Architecture and 

Sanitation 2 

Chemistry 3 

Biology and Botany 2 

15 



JUNIOR 

English 2 

Physics 3 

Psychology 3 

Economics 3 

Biology 3 

Dom. Art — 2nd terml 9 
Dom. Sci. — 1st term J 



16 



SENIOR 

English 3 

Food and Dietetics and 

Household Accounts 2 

Theory and Prac. of 

D. Sci. and D. Art 2 

H. Fur. and Decoration . . 2 

Textiles 2 

Physiology and Home 
Nursing and Care of 

Children 3 

Rural Economics 2 

16 



40 The State Normal 

SPECIAL AND ELECTIVE COURSES 

All students, even though they may not be appli- 
cants for a degree, are advised to elect one of the reg- 
ular courses. They furnish an excellent foundation 
of liberal education and at the same time allow a rea- 
sonable latitude for specialization in single branches. 
When it seems advisable, however, properly qualified 
students will be permitted to register for one of the 
following special courses : 

I. Brief Course for Teachers. 

Students registering for this course will, with the 
exception of foreign languages, which are optional, 
take six or more periods of their work in regular 
order as laid down in the Bachelor of Pedagogy course, 
page 35. Additional work, consideration being given 
to the candidate's preferences and to her previous 
studies, will then be assigned by the head of the 
Department of Education. 

Graduates holding the diploma of a recognized col- 
lege will be permitted to register for this course with- 
out examination. All other students must, with the 
exception of foreign languages, satisfy the College 
admission requirements given on pages 21-30, and 
present a ''first grade" teacher's certificate with evi- 
dence of one year's experience in teaching. 

There is no tuition charge for this course. 

II. Course for Nurses. 

The State Normal and Industrial College is glad 
to co-operate with all organizations having as their 
object the higher education and better professional 
equipment of the women of North Carolina. The 
course here outlined represents the voluntary choice 



and Industrial College 41 

of the North Carolina State Nurses' Association and 
is recommended to candidates for the nursing pro- 
fession as an excellent preparation for later special 
and professional study. 

Course: — Household Biology, Household Chemis- 
try, Dietetics, English, Hygiene, Laundry and Tex- 
tiles, Physiology, and Physical Training. 

Before registering for this course, the applicant 
must have fulfilled the College entrance requirements, 
and, in the case of continuous subjects, must have 
completed the lower work in those subjects. 

III. Business Courses. 

An outline of the courses offered by the Commer- 
cial Department, with the entrance requirements and 
expenses, will be found on pages 85-89. 

IV. Elective Course for Tuition Paying Students. 

In exceptional cases, tuition paying students who 
are not candidates for a degree, may elect such studies 
as they are prepared to pursue with profit, subject to 
the provisions that the total number of periods must 
not exceed sixteen and that six or more of these 
periods must be taken in regular order from one of the 
five degree courses outlined on pages 35-39. In gen- 
eral, such students must be able to enter the Sopho- 
more class. 

SUMMER SESSION COURSES 

In order to extend its advantages to women whose 
occupations prevent their attendance upon other ses- 
sions, the College maintains a Summer Session, begin- 
ning about June 1, and continuing eight weeks. Many 
of the courses offered are of collegiate grade, and 



42 The State Normal 

properly completed, may be counted towards a degree. 
Generally speaking, the courses are presented as units 
equivalent to one-fourth or one-half of a year's work. 
Proper sequence is provided, thereby enabling the stu- 
dent to continue her course in the ensuing fall, spring, 
or summer sessions. In brief, the Summer Session 
constitutes one of the regular terms of the college year 
and places the full resources of the Institution — 
faculty, buildings, dormitories, libraries, and labora- 
tories — at the service of those who may wish to devote 
part of their summer to college work. 

In the selection and arrangement of its Summer 
Courses, the College has had in view the needs of the 
following classes : (1) Teachers wishing special work 
in the Principles and Methods of Teaching (Primary, 
Grammar and High School), with opportunities for 
practice and observation work under experienced 
supervisors. (2) Teachers desiring advanced or colle- 
giate courses in philosophy, science, psychology 
and history of education. (3) Teachers of special sub- 
jects, such as Agriculture, Domestic Science, Vocal 
Music, Drawing, and Manual Arts. (4) High School 
teachers who desire advanced or extra work along 
the line of their specialties, with free use of good 
departmental libraries and well equipped laborato- 
ries. (5) College students who wish to earn advanced 
credit or to remove conditions. (6) Students pre- 
paring for college. (7) Mothers, wives and home 
makers who feel the need of practical help in such 
subjects as foods and food values, cookery, kitchen 
conveniences, home nursing, sanitation, and house- 
hold decoration. 

A special Bulletin descriptive of its Summer Ses- 
sion work is issued by the College. Copies of this 
Bulletin may be had upon application. 



and Industrial College 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF 
INSTRUCTION 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

JUNIUS A. MATHESON 
ROBERT A. MERRITT 

The purpose of this department is strictly profes- 
sional ; that is, to prepare in the best possible manner, 
young women for the work of organizing, governing, 
and teaching in the schools of North Carolina. Suc- 
cessful teaching must be based on well-defined prin- 
ciples of individual and social life and development 
and on a clear comprehension of the aim and purpose 
of education. The teacher of children should have 
broad and accurate scholarship. She should also have 
a knowledge of the nature and growth of the child's 
mind. But preparation for effective teaching does 
not end with a knowledge of subject and pupil. A 
teacher should be acquainted with the best modern 
practice of the profession and with the theories on 
which such practice is grounded. The best that train- 
ing can do is to add an increment of power to native 
gifts. To do this, teacher-training should have as 
the chief end in view the knowledge and use of 
method. Such, therefore, is the aim and purpose of 
this department. 

In addition to a theoretical study of the best that 
has been said and done in education, the College 
maintains 



44 The State Normal 

A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS 

This school is intended to be a laboratory having 
three well-defined objects in view: the study of chil- 
dren, the observation of correct methods, and practice 
work in actual teaching. It is here that all theories 
of method are tested in actual school room work. Stu- 
dents are required to do regular and definite work 
during the entire Senior year under the direction of 
the head of the department and of experienced super- 
vising teachers. Such required training in practical 
work gives the student not only an opportunity of 
demonstrating their own ability to plan lessons and to 
teach, but also confidence and skill in class manage- 
ment and in carrying out the various details of school 
work. 

The Training School, with separate and well 
appointed building, has ten classes and an enrollment 
of over three hundred and fifty children embracing all 
grades in elementary schools. In order to meet the 
demands for teachers in the Public High Schools of 
the State, students desiring to make a specialty of 
high school work will have an opportunity to teach 
such subjects as they may select. 

I. Psychology. — Junior year. Three hours a 
week. This is a general course in Psychology in which 
the laws and principles underlying mental processes 
are considered. 

II. History of Education. — Junior year. Three 
hours a week. A study of the origin and develop- 
ment of educational ideas most closely related to pres- 
ent educational problems. Observation in the Train- 
ing School. 



and Industrial College 45 

III. (a) Pedagogy. — Senior year. Four hours 
a week — entire year. Science and art of education. 
Special study of the method of teaching the different 
subjects. Lectures on discipline, school management, 
course of study, and the progress and development of 
educational thought. Parallel reading and study of 
the lives of educational reformers. 

III. (b) Practice in Teaching. — Senior year. 
Five hours a week — entire year. Teaching in the 
Training School under the direction of the head of the 
department and of the supervising teachers. The 
preparation of lesson plans; advanced work in child 
study ; application of facts discovered to the work of 
teaching. 

IV. Pedagogy. — Special course. Three hours a 
week — entire year. Brief course in principles and 
methods of teaching ; discipline ; general school man- 
agement, and special work in public school subjects, 
This course is intended for those who cannot remain 
long enough to complete the regular course in Peda- 
gogy. It includes text-book work, observation in 
Training School, and lectures. 

V. Psychology. — Three periods a week. Summer 
Session. 

This is an introductory course in Psychology for 
teachers. Its aim is to make the work of the teacher 
more efficient by basing it on a knowledge of the mind. 
Emphasis is therefore placed upon the relations of the 
fundamental principles of mental activity to practical 
school work. 

VI. Fundamental Principles of Teaching and 



46 The State Normal 

School Management. — Four periods a week. Summer 
Session. 

This course is primarily for teachers, and will 
include such topics as will be of direct value in the 
school room. 

Text-book work, lectures, and observation of regu- 
lar class-room work will furnish the basis of the 
course. Attention will be given to the physical and 
mental characteristics of childhood; the theory and 
practice of teaching in the elementary school; school 
organization and management; school discipline, and 
public school law. 

VII. Primary Methods. — Four periods a week. 
Summer Session. 

This course is for primary teachers. Special 
methods in reading, phonics, language, arithmetic, 
writing and drawing, through the first three grades, 
and the application of methods in actual school work 
will be emphasized. 

VIII. Grammar School Methods. — Four periods 
a week. Summer Session. 

In this course special methods in grammar school 
subjects will be given. English, History, Mathe- 
matics, Geography, Agriculture, and Drawing and the 
application of methods of presentation will be em- 
phasized. 

IX. High School Methods. — Four periods a week. 
Summer Session. 

The work of this course consists in Special Methods 
in the high school subjects, — Latin, Algebra, English, 
and History, — and observation of class and school 
room management, in the High School Department 
of the Training School. 



and Industrial College 47 

X. Observation. — Three hours a week. 

Training School. 

In connection with the work outlined in courses VI, 
VII, and VIII, demonstrative schools of primary, 
grammar and high school grades will be conducted 
during the session and under the supervision of expe- 
rienced teachers. The object of these schools is to fur- 
nish opportunities for the observation of instruction 
and of other phases of school life. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

WILLIAM C. SMITH 

MARTHA E. WINFIELD 

EMMA KING 

MARY K. DANIEL 

ELEANORE ELLIOTT 

SUSIE E. PURVIS 

SALLIE S. NEAL 

For admission requirements in English see pages 
24-26. 

I. Rhetoric and Composition. — Three hours a 
week — first term. Study of prose selections, descrip- 
tive and narrative. Theme writing and other exer- 
cises. Individual criticism and interviews. Required 
of Freshmen. 

II. Rhetorc and Composition. — Three hours a 
week — second term. Continuation of Course I. Speci- 
mens of exposition. Essays of Carlyle and Stevenson. 
Required of Freshmen. 

III. Rhetoric and Advanced Composition. — Three 
hours a week — first term. Study of prose selections 
of considerable length. Book reviews and literary 



48 The State Normal. 

criticism. Theme writing, outlines, and other written 
exercises. Personal interviews. Required of Sopho- 
mores. 

IV. Advanced Composition. — Three hours a week 
— second term. Theme writing continued as in Course 
III. Study of modern English prose, particularly 
the essays of Newman and Arnold. Required of 
Sophomores. 

V. English Poetry from 1780 to 1832. — Two hours 
a week — fall term. Study of the poetry of Cowper, 
Burns, Coleridge, Byron, Landor, and Shelley. 
Special attention given to the rise and development 
of the Romantic movement. Short papers and one 
long essay required. For Juniors. 

VI. Poetry. — Two hours a week — spring term. 
Continuation of Course V. Authors studied : Words- 
worth and Keats. For Juniors. 

VII. The Principles of Poetry. — One hour a week 
— fall and spring terms. Study of the nature and 
elements of poetry; poetic diction; metre, rhythm, 
rime, and stanza forms. Illustrative studies from Ten- 
nyson 's poetry. Lectures, and assigned readings from 
Arnold, Corson, Dowden, Hutton, and Stedman. Pre- 
requisites, Courses III and IV. For Juniors. Elec- 
tive with Course VIII. 

VIII. Composition — Description, Narration. — One 
hour a week — fall and spring terms. In this course 
the descriptive study is mainly incidental to the nar- 
rative. The work, based on the reading of a number 
of novels and short stories, consists in: (1) a series 
of papers on the theory of narrative writing as dis- 
cussed in a text and illustrated in the novels and 
stories read, and (2) ten or more themes of some 



and Industrial College 49 

length, most of which are short stories. Prerequisites, 
Courses I, II, III, and IV. For Juniors. Elective 
with Course VII. 

IX. British Poets. — Three hours a week — first 
term. Poetry of Arnold and Mrs. Browning. Selec- 
tions from Clough, Morris, Swinburne, and Rossetti. 
Prerequisites, Courses V and VI. For Seniors. 

X. Poetry of Browning. — Three hours a week — 
second term. Continuation of Course VII. For 
Seniors. 

XI. Elizabethan Drama. — Three hours a week — 
entire year. Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, 
Webster, and Shakespeare. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings in the dramatic history of the period and reading 
of about ten plays. For Seniors. Elective with 
Courses IX and X. 

XII. Composition and Rhetoric. — Teachers' 
Course. Five hours a week. Summer Session. 

The work will include the study, by means of text- 
books and lectures, of the principles of rhetoric as they 
apply to the choice of words and the structure of sen- 
tences, paragraphs, and whole compositions. Fre- 
quent short themes, several essays, and occasional 
exercises in class will be written. Regular conferences 
with the instructor will constitute a part of the course. 

XIII. Literature. — Teachers' Course. High 
School Classics. Four hours a week. Summer Ses- 
sion. 

A study of at least ten of the English classics, 
including all of those on the required study list for 
College entrance. 



50 The State Normal 

In addition, there will be lectures on the teaching 
of English, including among others, such topics as the 
following : Aims of English teaching : what to empha- 
size, form and content; the teaching of poetry; the 
essay problem — how related to the study of the class- 
ics; the teachers' library. 

XIV. Literature. — Teachers' Course. Four hours 
a week. Summer Session. 

A general survey of English poetry from Chaucer 
to Tennyson. The lives of the authors, the age in 
which they lived, and the particular contribution of 
each author to literature will be considered, but the 
chief purpose of the course will be to familiarize the 
student with the actual stream of poetry through a 
critical study of representative selections. 

XV. Essentials of English Grammar. — Four 
periods a week. Summer Session. 

An outline study of English grammar with special 
reference to the structure of the sentence. The course 
is intended for public school teachers and includes a 
review of inflection, word analysis, clausal and phrasal 
relations and construction, oral and written analysis, 
and diagraming. 

XVI. Literature. — College Admission Require- 
ments. — Five periods a week. Summer Session. 

This course is intended to meet the needs of stu- 
dents preparing to enter college. The books studied 
will be those included in the College entrance require- 
ment for 1915: Shakespeare's Macbeth, Tennyson's 
Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The 
Passing of Arthur, Burke's Speech on Conciliation 
with America, and Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 



and Industrial College 51 

DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

MARY SETTLE SHARPE 

There is an ever-increasing need for young women 
who can speak easily and forcefully in public, and who 
can adequately interpret the writings of the best 
authors. This is especially desirable in those who are 
to teach the youth of our State. 

Rightly studied, the art of interpretation, or 
expression, is a key to the higher, spiritual meanings 
of all literature, and it touches life itself most vitally. 
The spoken word has ever been the word of power. 
Thought, however grand or beautiful, if unexpressed, 
is vain, but transmitted through the media of trained 
voices and responsive bodies its possibilities are illimit- 
able. 

I. Training of Body and Voice. — Two hours a 
week. — Required of Freshmen in the Bachelor of 
Pedagogy Course. 

Body; poise and bearing. Voice, articulation. 
Reading with special reference to correct use of the 
voice, right habits of breathing, clear and direct giving 
of the thought. Recitations. 

II. Training of Body and Voice. — One hour a 
week. — Required of Juniors in the Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science Courses. 

Voice culture; rhythmic exercises for freedom, 
ease and grace of body ; gesture ; expressional analysis 
and recitation of oratorical, narrative, lyric and dra- 
matic forms of literature. The work is along the lines 
of Course I, but is much more advanced. 



52 The State Normal 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ECONOMICS 

W. C. JACKSON 

MARY D. TYLER 

HARRIET W. ELLIOTT 

For entrance requirements, see pages 23-24. 

I. Mediaeval and Modern Europe. — Three hours 
a week for the year. The aim of this course is to give 
an outline of the history of Europe from the later 
Roman empire to the beginning of the French Revolu- 
tion. Emphasis is placed on Feudalism, the Church, 
the Renaissance and Reformation. 

Text, readings, reports, and occasional lectures. 
Elective with Mathematics in the Sophomore year 
of the A. B., B. S., and B. P. Courses. 

II. Modern European History. — Three hours a 
week for the year. This is an introductory course to 
the current national and international problems of the 
European nations, and begins with the French Revolu- 
tion. The chief matters considered will be the French 
Revolution ; the Restoration in France and the Revolu- 
tion, 1830 ; the Industrial Revolution ; the Revolution, 
1848; the development of Italian and German unity; 
the Third French Republic; the political and social 
reforms in England ; the Russian empire ; the present 
economic and social problems in Europe ; and the terri- 
torial expansion of the nineteenth century of the 
various European powers. 

Text, outside reading, and the preparation of 
maps and reports. Junior elective in A. B., B. S., and 
B. P. Courses. 

III. American History. — Three hours a week for 
the year. This course will include a brief survey of 



and Industrial College 53 

our colonial history, followed by a more detailed study 
of later epochs. Among the topics given especial 
attention will be the making of the constitution, the 
beginning of political parties, early diplomatic rela- 
tions, rise of sectionalism, slavery, Civil War, and a 
summary of succeeding events. 

Text, collateral reading, reports and lectures. 
Senior elective in A. B., B. S., and B. P. Courses. 

IV. Introduction to Economics. — Three hours a 
week for the year. A study of the fundamental laws 
and theory of economics; and an historical, compara- 
tive and critical study of practical economic problems. 

Text, readings, reports, and occasional lectures. 
Senior elective in A. B., B. S., and B. P. Courses; 
required in Junior B. S. H. E. Course. 

V. English History. — Five hours a week. Sum- 
mer Session. 

This course is a review of English History and is 
offered for students who wish to meet the College 
entrance requirement in history. Some previous study 
of the subject is necessary, as this is a review course. 

Text-books, collateral reading, preparation of maps 
and reports. 

VI. North Carolina History. — Five hours a week. 
Summer Session. 

The aim of the course is to give a general outline 
of the history of North Carolina from its earliest set- 
tlement to the opening of the Revolution. Ashe's His- 
tory of North Carolina and the Colonial Records form 
the basis of the work, but other collateral reading is 
required. 

Text-books, collateral reading, preparation of maps 
and reports. 



54 The State Normal 

VII. Teachers' Course in American History. — 
Five hours a week. Summer Session. 

This course is intended primarily for those who 
teach American history in the high school. It will 
include a review of the principal epochs of Ameri- 
can history. 

The last two weeks of the course will be devoted to 
the whole problem of history in the High School — 
course of study, methods, collateral reading, etc. 

Text-books, collateral reading, preparation of maps 
and reports. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



GERTRUDE W. MENDENHALL 

CORA STRONG 

VIRGINIA RAGSDALE 

ELIZABETH POTWINE 

NETTIE LEETE PARKER 

BERTHA STANBURY 



I. Required Course for Freshmen. — Four hours 
a week for the year. 

(a) Solid and Spherical Geometry. Three hours, 
first term. 

(b) Higher Algebra. One hour, first term; two 
hours, second term. 

This course will open with a rapid review of the 
principal topics in high school algebra (factoring, 
radicals, theory of exponents, quadratics, simultane- 
ous quadratics). The review will be followed by the 
study of such topics as mathematical induction, permu- 
tations and combinations, complex numbers, loga- 
rithms, determinants and the theory of equations. 



and Industrial College 55 

(c) Plane Trigonometry. Two hours, second term. 

The angular analysis, including transformations, 
trigonometric equations and inverse functions, is fully 
treated, as well as the solution of right and oblique 
triangles and the practical use of the tables. 

II. Analytical Geometry and Conic Sections. — 
Open to students who have completed Course I. Four 
hours a week for a year. 

III. Differential and Integral Calculus. — Open to 
students who have completed Course II. Four hours 
a week for a year. 

IV. Modem Analytical Geometry and Curve 
Tracing. — Four hours for a year ; or, Theory of Equa- 
tions and History of Mathematics. Four hours for a 
year. Open to students who have completed Course II. 

V. (a) Arithmetic. — Three hours a week for first 
term. 

( o ) High School Mathematics. — A study of critical 
parts of high school Algebra and Plane Geometry. 
Three hours a week for second term. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors, and Special Pedagogy students 
who have fulfilled the entrance requirements. 



56 The State Normal 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND 
PHYSIOGRAPHY 

EUGENE W. GUDGER 
MARY ROBINSON 

I. Household Biology. — One recitation and two 
laboratory hours a week, fall term. — Freshman year. 
Required in Bachelor of Science and Home Economics 
courses; elective in Bachelor of Pedagogy course. 

This course is especially designed to prepare stu- 
dents for work in Domestic Science; hence it deals 
chiefly with yeasts, bacteria, and molds, those micro- 
organisms which play such a large part in the daily 
life of the housekeeper. These plants are studied 
structurally under the microscope, while, by experi- 
ments on various foods, their activities are made clear 
to the student. The beginnings of the study of Sani- 
tation are made and some attention is paid to the rela- 
tion of micro-organisms to Agriculture, The course 
includes the study of Ameba and of a green Alga, 
in order to give some idea of the relations of animals 
and of plants, both green and colorless. 

This work is based mainly on Conn's Bacteria, 
Yeasts, and Molds in the Home, and Ritchie's Primer 
of Sanitation. 

II. Botany. — Two hours a week, spring term. — 
Freshman year. This course is a continuation of the 
work of the first term. It is really a nature study 
course in Botany, being designed to teach the student 
to see how plants grow and behave, and to understand 
their life and work. The plant in its environment is 
first studied, with special reference to its struggle for 
existence. Then it is considered as a whole, analyzed 
in its parts and the function of each part studied. 



and Industrial College 57 

Considerable attention is paid to the agricultural side 
of the subject. The object in view is not to have the 
student learn the names and peculiarities of any set 
number of plants or flowers, but to teach her some- 
thing of the lives, activities, and inter-relationships 
of the common plants. Especially is it intended to 
prepare her to teach nature study work in plants. To 
carry out the purpose of this course, weekly walks are 
taken in the park adjoining the campus, and at inter- 
vals longer excursions are made into the surrounding 
country. Bailey's Elementary Botany is used. 

III. General Biology. — Two recitations and three 
hours of laboratory work a week throughout the year. 
Required in Junior year of Science and Home Eco- 
nomics courses; elective in Junior year of Pedagogy 
course. This course is designed as a part of the 
liberal education of every student and is intended 
to prepare students for work in Physiology and 
Hygiene. It must be preceded by Biology I and II. 

The work of the fall term is largely given to a 
study of the activities of micro-organisms in relation 
to Sanitation, Agriculture, and the industrial arts. 
To this end a large amount of parallel reading is 
required, and by field trips the work of bacteria and 
molds in producing plant diseases and in mineralizing 
dead organic matter is made clear. Later, Chara, 
Hydra, and the Crawfish are studied to show the essen- 
tial structures of the invertebrates and the inter-rela- 
tionships of plants and animals. The spring term is 
given to the study of the anatomy, physiology, his- 
tology, and embryology of the frog, as leading up to 
the study of human anatomy and physiology. 

The object of this course is not so much to teach the 
minute structure of plants and animals as it is to 



58 The State Normal 

inculcate the great principles and generalizations of 
Biology, to show the dependence on each other of all 
living things, and to prepare the student to make use 
of these things in her life and her teaching. No sin- 
gle text-book being available, a number are used. 

IV.. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. — Two 
lectures or quizzes and three hours' laboratory work a 
week throughout the year. Optional in Senior year 
of Pedagogy and Science courses. In this course, 
which must be preceded by Biology I, II, and III, 
students dissect and study the chief systems of the 
Dogfish, Catfish, Turtle, Pigeon, and Rabbit, in order 
to work out the comparative structures of the Verte- 
brates and the principles of animal morphology. In 
addition to the dissections noted, there will be given a 
course of lectures and seminary talks based on 
Abbott's Elementary Principles of General Biology. 

V. Physiography. — Three hours a week through- 
out the Sophomore year. Elective in B. P. and B. S. 
courses. This subject is offered in these courses in 
order to give students some adequate preparation for 
the teaching of Elementary and Physical Geography. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

MARY M. PETTY 

I. General Chemistry. — Three hours a week. In- 
struction in this department is given by lectures, illus- 
trated by experiments, general discussion, and labo- 
ratory work. Each student will perform a given num- 
ber of experiments in order to become acquainted with 



and Industrial. College 59 

the nature and behavior of the various substances 
treated in the lectures. The latter part of the year 
will be devoted to simple methods of analysis. 

II. Analytical Chemistry. — Three hours a week. 
This course is offered to students who wish to prepare 
themselves for special work in Chemistry and allied 
subjects. Prerequisites: The science work of the 
Sophomore and Junior years. 

The students will be expected to become familiar 
with the most common elements, and to be able to 
detect them either free or in compounds. They will 
also have some instruction in the quantitative analysis 
of compounds. 

III. Household Chemistry. — Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods a week. Summer Session. 
Prerequisite: One year of General Chemistry. 

This course is designed to give work in the chemis- 
try of the materials most intimately connected with 
daily life. The following subjects will be considered : 

Air: Its constituents, impurities, ventilation. 

Fuels: Kinds — gaseous, liquid and solid. Heat 
and Ventilation. Economic value of various kinds of 
fuels. 

Lighting : Methods. Proper conditions for effec- 
tive lighting. Comparison of different methods. 

Water: Composition and properties, both phys- 
ical and chemical. Importance as food and in diges- 
tion. Impurities and methods for purifying. Water 
analysis and interpretation of results. 

Food: Food principles. Chemical changes due 
to cooking food. Varieties of foods and their chem- 
ical composition. Study of special processes, such as 
bread making, fermentation, soap making, preserving 
food and fruits. Milk and dairy products, and milk 
testing. Beverages. Chemistry of digestion. 



60 The State Normal 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

WILLIAM C. A. HAMMEL 

I. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory 
work counting three hours a week. 

Air, Liquids, Heat, Dynamics, first half year. 

Electricity, Magnetism, Light and Sound, second 
half year. Required in Bachelor of Pedagogy, Bach- 
elor of Science and Home Economics courses ; elective 
in Bachelor of Arts course. 

II. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory 
work counting three hours a week. Required in 
Junior year of Bachelor of Science course, elective in 
Senior year of Bachelor of Pedagogy course. 

III. Laboratory Course. — Six hours of laboratory 
work counting three hours a week. In this course 
the student is trained in more advanced work and in 
methods of research. Towards the end of the course 
each student undertakes a brief original investigation 
upon a topic assigned by the instructor. The require- 
ments for admission to this course are Physics I and 
Physics II. Elective in Senior year of Bachelor of 
Science course. 

IV. Elementary Physics, Teachers' Course. — Five 
periods a week. — Summer Session. 

Air, Liquids, Heat. 

Recognizing the fact that most of the Physics 
taught in the rural schools is taught without appa- 
ratus, this course will consist in illustrating important 
laws by using simple, inexpensive apparatus, con- 
structed in the laboratory by each student. 

This apparatus will become the property of the 
student constructing it, thus forming a nucleus for 



and Industrial College 61 

a good working laboratory. There will be a charge of 
one dollar, to cover cost of material. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL ARTS 

WILLIAM C. A. HAMMEL 
JULIA M. RAINES 

This department was organized to meet the grow- 
ing demand in the South for teachers of the manual 
arts. The course is planned to give to teachers of all 
grades, in rural as well as city schools, an opportunity 
to prepare themselves as instructors in the subject. 

The course has been arranged with a view to the 
use of inexpensive, and, so far as possible, native 
materials ; so that the manual arts in some form may 
be practicable in all schools, and need not be excluded 
from any on account of additional cost. 

I. Paper folding, paper cutting, cardboard work, 
Venetian iron work, basketry, knife work, and simple 
problems in bench work. This work is for primary 
and grammar grades, and is adapted for use in city 
and in rural schools. Two periods a week — one hour 
credit. For Juniors in Bachelor of Pedadogy course. 

II. Theory and practice of teaching manual arts 
in the grades. Applied design and craft work for the 
high schools. The craft work includes weaving, book 
binding and book repairing, simple problems in jew- 
elry work and in brass and copper. Two periods a 
week — one hour credit. For Seniors in Bachelor of 
Pedagogy course. 



62 The State Normal 

III. Architecture and Sanitation. — History and 
styles of architecture. Types of dwellings. House 
planning, designing and remodeling. Home building 
with relation to site, specific needs, means, etc. Con- 
structive features, building materials, color schemes, 
cost. Sanitary condition of house and site, with rela- 
tion to soil, water supply, plumbing, sewerage, heating, 
lighting, ventilation, disposal of refuse. Four periods 
a week — two hours ' credit. For Sophomores in Home 
Economics course. 

IV. Household Decoration and Furnishing. — 
Treatment of wood work, floors, and walls, with rela- 
tion to style of architecture, use of room, exposure, 
lighting, etc. Their care and preservation. Floor 
coverings, hangings, furnishings. Their cost, suita- 
bility, design, coloring, and harmony. Kitchen 
arrangements and equipment, household utensils, labor 
and time-saving devices. Four periods a week — -two 
hours' credit. For Seniors in Home Economics 
course. 

V. Teachers' Course. — Summer Session. This 
course is designed to meet the recognized need of hand 
work in the primary grades, and consists of paper 
folding, paper cutting, cardboard construction, and 
knife work in wood, together with the proper correla- 
tion of the handling of crayons and water colors. 
Four periods a week. 



and Industrial College 63 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 



VIOLA BODDIE 

JULIA DAMERON 

MARY BALDWIN MITCHELL 



For admission requirements in Latin, see page 28. 
Students offering two units in Latin will take 
Course A. 

A. Cicero. — Four hours a week, entire year. 

Cicero's Orations, about six. Talks on Roman His- 
tory. Composition. 

I. History. — Four hours a week, first term. Livy : 
Composition. 

II. History. — Four hours a week, second term. 
Tacitus, Sallust: Composition. 

III. Epic Poetry. — Three hours a week, first term. 
Vergil: Selections from earlier forms of the Roman 
epic ; lectures on topics related to epic poetry. 

IV. Roman Lyric Poetry. — Three hours a week, 
second term. Horace's Odes used as the basis of 
study. 

V. Comedy. — Three hours a week, first term. 
Terence. 

VI. Comedy. — Three hours a week, second term. 
Plautus. 

VII. Satire. — Three hours a week, first term. 
Horace, Persius, Petronius and Juvenal. 

VIII. Cicero. — Three hours a week, second term. 
De Senectute and De Amicitia. 



64 The State Normal 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 

HINDA TEAGUE HILL 

EVA MAY BRYAN 

EMMA RAY LITTLE 

For admission requirements in French, see page 
29. 

Students who do not offer any French for entrance 
will, if they are to pursue the subject in College, take 
Course I. Students offering one, two or three units 
of French will, if they continue the subject, take 
Courses II, III, or IV, respectively. 

I. Grammar and Beading. — Four hours a week. 
Chardenal's Complete French Course; Snow and 
Lebon's Easy French; Mairet's La Tdche du petit 
Pierre; composition based on text read, dictation, con- 
versation. In this course special emphasis is laid on 
pronunciation, simple idiomatic constructions, the reg- 
ular conjugations, and the more common irregular 
verbs. 

II. Advanced Grammar and Beading. — Three 
hours a week. — Fraser and Squair, French Grammar; 
Francois, Introductory French Composition; Hugo, 
Cosette; Labiche and Martin, Le Voyage de M. Perri- 
chon; Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin; Daudet, Neuf con- 
tes choisis; Merimee, Colomba; composition and con- 
versation based on books read. 

III. Seventeenth Century Literature. — Three 
hours a week. — Corneille, Le Cid; Eacine, Athalie; 
Moliere, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme; La Fontaine, 
Fables; Francois, Advanced French Prose Composi- 
tion; History of Seventeenth Century Literature. 



and Industrial College 65 

IV. Modern Literature. — Three hours a week. — 
Balzac, Le Cure de Tours; Hugo, Hernani, and Les 
Miser ables; Lamartine, Jeanne d'Arc; Loti, Pecheur 
d'Islande; Sandeau, Mile, de la Seigliere; Sand, La 
Mare au Diable; Bacon, TJne Semaine a Paris; History 
of Nineteenth Century Literature. 

One period a week in this course is devoted to 
French conversation and the criticism of themes writ- 
ten in French by the class. Summaries and reviews 
of books read are required. 

V. Speaking and Writing French. — Three hours 
a week. — Super, Readings from French History; 
Laurie, Memoir es d'un Collegien; Souvestre, TJn Phil- 
osophe sous les toits; Chapuzet and Daniels, Moliere 
en Becits; Scribe, Le Verre d'Eau. This course is 
conducted wholly in French and consists of oral and 
written reproduction of the texts read. Extensive col- 
lateral reading and frequent themes are required. 

VI. The Teaching of French in the High School. 
— Two periods a week. — Summer Session. 

This course will consist of discussions of the 
various methods of teaching French, with the advan- 
tages and disadvantages of each ; the proper presenta- 
tion of the more important topics in Grammar, requi- 
sites of a satisfactory text-book; desirable books of 
reference. 

Attention will be paid, so far as possible, to the 
special problems of the individual teacher. 

In each course collateral reading in French is 
required in addition to the texts specified above. The 
amount varies according to the course. The books 
named in the foregoing courses may be varied slightly 
from year to year. 



66 The State Normal 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

CHRISTINE REINOKEN 
META SCHMIDT 

For admission requirements in German, see page 
30. 

Students who do not offer any German for 
entrance, will, if they are to pursue the subject in 
College, take Course I. Students offering one, two 
or three units of German, will, if they continue the 
subject, take Courses II, III, or IV, respectively. 

I. Grammar. — Bierwirth. 

Beading: Deutsche Heimat, Schrakamp. Der 
Letzte, Wildenbruch. 
Four hours a week. 

II. Grammar Review. — Bacon, German Composi- 
tion. 

Literature: Fouque, Undine; Raabe, Else von der 
Tanne; Schiller, Die Jungfrau von Orleans; Lessing, 
Minna von Barnhelm. 

Three hours a week. 

III. Composition. — Osthaus and Bierman. 
Literature: Kleist, Michael Kohlhaas; Heine, Die 

Harzreise; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea; Freitag, 
Aus dem Staate Friedrichs des Grossen. 
Three hours a week. 

IV. Composition, continued. — Osthaus. 
Literature : Scheffel, Ekkehard; Collitz, Selections 

from Classical German Literature from the Reforma- 
tion to the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century; 
Goethe, Faust. 

Three hours a week. 



and Industrial College 67 

V. Modern German Drama. — Kleist, Prinz von 
Hamburg; Grillparzer, Das goldene Vliess; Hebbel, 
Agnes Bernauer; Ludwig, Der Erbforster; Haupt- 
mann, Die versunkene Glocke; Sudermann, Teja, etc. 
Outside reading. 

Three hours a week. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE 

ANNA M. GOVE 

GRACE HUSE 

PATTIE McADAMS 

I. Hygiene. — A brief course of lectures in practi- 
cal care of health. Required of all students in their 
entrance year. 

II. Physiology and Hygiene. — Three hours a 
week. For Seniors. Freshman Biology and General 
Chemistry are prerequisites. The course aims to give 
a practical knowledge of the cells, tissues, and organs 
of the body; of the general structure and functions; 
and to apply this knowledge to the consideration of 
diet and other practical hygiene. 

The work is illustrated by simple laboratory exer- 
cises, use of microscope, and dissection of lower ani- 
mals. 



The State Normal 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING 

LAURA McALLESTER 
RHODA BAXTER 

The Department of Physical Training has among 
its chief objects: 

The promotion of bodily health; development of 
grace, ease of movement, precision, alertness, agility, 
and endurance; correction of faulty postures; and 
relaxation from mental work. 

The work is divided into five departments. 

I. Swedish Drill. — The exercises are systematic 
and progressive and embrace both floor drills and 
apparatus work. 

Required of every student in college. 

II. Theory of Gymnastics. — Course for Teachers. 
One period a week throughout the year for Juniors 
and other students who have had sufficient practical 
gymnastic work. 

It includes the study of the Ling or Swedish sys- 
tem of gymnastics for the school room; games for 
school room and play ground; and folk games and 
dances. 

III. Supervised Teaching of Games and Gym- 
nastics. — Open to all Seniors who have practice teach- 
ing in the Training School. 

IV. Aesthetic Gymnastics. — One period a week. 
Open to Seniors. 

This course embraces folk dancing and work in 
rhythmical movements for the whole body. 



and Industrial College 69 

V. Out-of-Door Sports. — Open to every student 
in College. All sports, including field hockey, basket- 
ball, tennis, and other games, are carefully supervised. 

Medical and special corrective gymnastics will be 
given to any suffering from bodily ailments or faulty 
postures. 

Every student in the College, unless excused by the 
resident physician, will be required to take the regu- 
lar work of the department. 

All new students will be required to purchase a 
gymnasium suit and shoes after their arrival at Col- 
lege. The cost of these is $6.00. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



WADE R. BROWN 

CHARLES J. BROCKMANN 

KATHRYN M. SEVERSON 

GERTRUDE SOUSLET 

ETHEL GARDNER 

MYRA ALDERMAN ALBRIGHT 

ETHEL LEWIS HARRIS 

ALLIENE RICHARD MINOR 



The College offers regular courses leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music in Piano, Organ, Violin, 
and Voice, and furnishes a special course in Public 
School Music Methods. Applied music may be taken 
by students of any of the regular college courses, pro- 
vided the music added is within the limit of seventeen 
hours allowed as a maximum. 

The charges for lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, 
and Voice are given under the head of expenses, page 
97 of the catalogue. 



70 The State Normal 

An outline of the four years ' course leading to the 
Bachelor of Music degree is given on page 38. 

The requirements for admission to the Bachelor of 
Music course, with outline of a suggested preparatory 
course, are given on pages 30-32. 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY 

Course I. Solfeggio. — Required of Freshmen, 
Bachelor of Music Course. Three hours a week. A 
course in sight-reading, rhythmic and melodic dicta- 
tion, with attention given to ear training, tone produc- 
ton, and enunciation. Class drill in staff notation 
and in sight-singing with emphasis laid upon tonal 
relations as a practical basis for the study of harmony. 

Course II. Harmony. — Required of Sophomores, 
Bachelor of Music Course. Two hours a week. The 
study of intervals, triads and their inversions; sim- 
ple part writing from given basses and sopranos; 
chords of the seventh, harmonizing simple melodies 
and figured basses, simple modulations. Triads, 
chords of the seventh, various cadences and simpler 
modulations played at the piano. 

Course III. Advanced Harmony. — Required of 
Juniors, Bachelor of Music Course. Two hours . a 
week. Advanced study of secondary sevenths; chro- 
matically altered chords, modulation in general, sus- 
pension, retardation, appoggiatura, anticipation, pass- 
ing tone, and pedal point. 

Progressions involved in the written work trans- 
posed into various keys at the piano. 

Course IV. History of Music. — Required of Soph- 
omores, Bachelor* of Music Course. Two hours a 
week. General History of Music, with special atten- 



and Industrial College 71 

tion to the period since the year 1600, and with empha- 
sis in the second term on the great masters. 

Course V. History of Music. — Great composers 
and their works. Eequired of Juniors, Bachelor of 
Music Course. Two hours a week. An illustrated 
lecture course making a biographical and critical 
study of the significance to music of a few of the most 
famous composers. 

Course VI. Counterpoint. — Required of Seniors, 
Bachelor of Music Course. Two hours a week. Coun- 
terpoint in two, three, and four parts. Harmoniza- 
tion and supplying additional voices to chorals and 
other melodies used as Canti Fermi. 

Course VII. Analysis. — Required of Seniors, 
Bachelor of Music Course. Two hours a week. The 
elements of Musical Form. The Primary, Song, 
Rondo, Aria, Sonata, and Fugue forms analytically 
considered. 

Course VIII. Public School Music. — Elective with 
Expression in Freshman year of Bachelor of Peda- 
gogy course. Three hours a week. A course present- 
ing the subject-matter which the regular grade teacher 
must teach in the elementary schools. 

It includes the study of notation, scales, signa- 
tures, rhythm, sight-reading, ear-training, dictation, 
both rhythmic and melodic, tone production, musical 
interpretation, graded melodies for individual sight- 
singing, the singing of songs, and two, three, and four 
part-songs. 

Course IX. Public School Music Methods. — Open 
to Seniors of the Bachelor of Music Course. Three 
hours a week. A course designed for those who wish 
to fit themselves to be supervisors of music in the pub- 



72 The State Normal 

lie schools. The work includes a study of rote songs 
and their application to school work; the elements of 
music as presented in the grades; study of the child 
voice; the supervisor's problems, and how to meet 
them; study and interpretation of school songs; out- 
lining of material ; music in the high school ; the prepa- 
ration of lesson plans. Practice teaching before the 
class and in the grades of the Training School, under 
the direction of the head of the Department of Educa- 
tion and of the supervising teachers. 

Course X. Normal Piano Methods. — Open to 
Juniors, in Piano, Bachelor of Music Course. Two 
hours a week. Classification of fundamental teaching 
material and best methods of presentation to the child 
mind. Notation, sight-reading, ear-training, rhythm, 
technic, melody writing, and musical games. 

Observation of children's classes. 

Course XL Normal Piano Teaching. — Open to 
Seniors, Bachelor of Music Course. Two hours a week. 
Practice of the principles learned in the previous 
course, by the teaching of children, under the super- 
vision and direction of the Department of Education. 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

By ''Applied Music" is meant the practical study 
of Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice, in private indi- 
vidual lessons. 

PIANO 

The course of study in this department includes: 

I. Technical exercises which are intended to give 
control of the muscles of fingers, hands, and arms, 
making them responsive to the commands of the will. 



and Industrial College 73 

II. Etudes by the best teachers and composers, 
which are designed to give further development to the 
executive powers, to bring about a finer relation 
between the physical and intellectual faculties, and to 
form a connecting link between purely technical work 
and the higher forms of musical expression. 

III. Compositions by the best composers of the 
classic, romantic and modern schools. 

VOICE CULTURE 

True cultivation of the voice consists in the devel- 
opment of pure tone and its easy natural use and con- 
trol in singing. Correct use of the breath, intona- 
tion, attack, legato, accent, phrasing, and enunciation 
are the leading features of technical drill. At the 
same time, a higher ideal than the perfection of mere 
mechanical skill is sought, namely, a musicianly style 
of singing and all that is implied in the broad term 
''interpretation", together with a thorough apprecia- 
tion of the best work of the best masters, both old 
and new. 

ORGAN 

This course provides for a thorough training in 
all that pertains to a mastery of the organ for church 
music, voluntaries, the art of improvisation, system- 
atic drill in technic, registration, and the art of 
accompaniment. The course of study is especially 
arranged to give a knowledge of the different schools 
of organ music as represented by the best composers. 

VIOLIN 

The instruction is based upon the most thorough 



74 The State Normal 

methods of teaching, including a graded list of etudes, 
solo pieces, and concertos by the best writers. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS IN MUSIC 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the regular 
four years' theoretical and literary course, together 
with the four years' course in applied music, the can- 
didate for the Bachelor of Music degree must satis- 
factorily perform programs conforming to the fol- 
lowing schedule : 

For Piano Students. — A concerto or chamber- 
musical work of advanced difficulty. One of the Beet- 
hoven Sonatas of the middle period. Selections from 
the more important works of Schumann, Chopin, 
Grieg, or other standard composers of the romantic 
and modern schools. 

For Vocal Students. — An operatic aria. An aria 
from a standard oratorio. A group of songs of 
Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Jensen, or Franz. A 
group of modern songs. 

For Organ Students. — One of the great preludes 
and fugues of Bach. A sonata of Mendelssohn, Gruil- 
mant, or Rheinberger. Selections from the works of 
Thiele, Widor, Merkel, and other standard composers. 

For Violin Students. — A standard sonata for 
piano and violin. A concerto of advanced difficulty. 
Selections from the more important works of Vieux- 
temps, Wieniawski, and other standard writers. 

ENSEMBLE PLAYING 

Ensemble classes meet for the study of concerted 
music. Four and eight-hand piano music is studied ; 



and Industrial College 75 

thus pupils become acquainted with masterpieces of 
orchestral literature often inaccessible to music stu- 
dents, and acquire habits of self-control and steadiness 
of rhythm in sight-reading and accompanying. Sopho- 
mores, Juniors and Seniors in the Piano Course will 
devote one hour each week to ensemble playing. 

SOLO CLASS 

As a preparation for recital and concert playing, 
a weekly solo class is held. All students in the Sopho- 
more, Junior and Senior classes in the Piano Course 
are required to attend. The standard compositions 
studied by different members of the class are analyzed 
by the director of music and afterwards performed by 
the student. In this way all students acquire a wide 
and intimate acquaintance with standard pianoforte 
literature. 

STUDENTS' RECITALS 

Students' Kecitals are given fortnightly, at which 
time works studied in the class room are performed 
before the students of the music department. All 
music students are required to attend these recitals 
and to take part in them when requested to do so. 
These semi-public appearances are of great assistance 
in enabling the student to acquire that ease and self- 
possession so essential to a successful public perform- 
ance. 

ARTIST AND FACULTY RECITALS 

Not less important than class room instruction is 
the opportunity of hearing good music rendered by 
artists of superior ability. To afford students this 



76 The State Normal 

opportunity, a regular series of recitals is given each 
year, the best artists available being secured. 

Recitals and concepts are given frequently by 
members of the music faculty during the school year. 

COLLEGE CHOIR 

The College Choir, numbering 130 voices, sings at 
special services and on festival occasions. The works 
of the best composers of sacred and secular music are 
studied. 

The conditions of membership are : A voice of fair 
effectiveness, a correct ear, some knowledge of musical 
notation, and regularity in attendance. Open to all 
students of the College who can meet the conditions 
of membership. 

ORCHESTRA 

The College Orchestra is open to all students who 
play any orchestral instrument reasonably well. 
Weekly rehearsals are held, and the orchestra is heard, 
on various occasions, throughout the year. 

MUSIC SUPPLIES 

Music students buy their own sheet music and 
music books. They are expected to deposit with the 
College Registrar at the beginning of the session, a 
sum of money sufficient to pay for sheet music supplies 
used. A ticket will be issued for each deposit, and 
unused coupons will be redeemed in full at the end of 
the session. The amount thus deposited will be from 
three to five dollars. 



and Industrial College 77 

DEPARTMENT OF DRAWING 

MELVILLE VINCENT FORT 

I. Object drawing, simple designing and illustrat- 
ing. — Mediums used : pencil and colored crayons. 
Once a month a famous painting is studied. 

Two hours a week. 

II. Object drawing for light and shade. — Design- 
ing and illustrating are continued in this year with 
pencil, colored crayon and water colors as mediums. 
The lives of some of the great artists are studied. 

Three hours a week. 

III. For Teachers. — Four periods a week. — Sum- 
mer Session. 

This course is planned especially for public school 
teachers who have had no previous instruction in 
drawing. Practice will be devoted to work of the 
same character as that given to children in the schools. 
Special attention will be paid to methods of class 
presentation. This course should enable the teacher 
to use intelligently the text-book adopted by the State. 

Mediums used: chalk, crayola, pencils, brush and 
ink, and water color. 

IV. For Teachers. — Four periods a week. — Sum- 
mer Session. 

A course for those who may desire advanced work 
along the lines of art in our public schools. The work 
is designed to meet the needs of supervisors, special 
teachers of drawing, and regular grade teachers who 
have had some previous instruction in the subject. 

An effort will be made to give the teachers taking 
this course such a group of principles and methods as 



78 The State Normal 

will enable them to do their work intelligently and 
happily. Public school problems as found in North 
Carolina will be carefully considered, and a course of 
study will be worked out to meet the requirements. 
Opportunity will be offered for observation of lessons 
taught in the Training School. 



DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

MINNIE L. JAMISON 

I. Household Bacteriology. — Two hours a week, 
fall term of Freshman year. This course, described 
elsewhere in the catalogue as Biology I, may be re- 
garded as preparatory to Domestic Science. From 
the standpoint of the student in Domestic Science it 
covers the study of dust and dust plants in their 
relation to the home and housekeeper, bacteria, botani- 
cal position, method of reproduction, spores, food. 
Friendly bacteria: — as scavengers; in butter-making, 
in cheese-making, vinegar, and fermentation. Harm- 
ful bacteria : — causing fermentation of food, putrefac- 
tion, decay, souring of milk, potato rot, etc. Disease 
germs : — methods of prevention, antiseptics, disinfect- 
ants, sterilization, Pasteurization, sunshine, and fresh 
air. Molds: — reproduction; work; favorable and 
unfavorable conditions of growth. Yeasts: — where 
found; work; products; used in bread-making; best 
conditions for growth. e. w. gudger. 

II. Domestic Science. — Three hours a week. 

A. Food and Dietetics. — This division embraces 



and Industrial College 79 

the following general topics : Composition and nutri- 
tive value of foods; fundamental principles and pro- 
cesses of cookery ; practical work in plain and advanced 
cookery; study of special foods; meats; milk and its 
products; cereals and their products; breads, vege- 
tables, sugars, beverages; special diet; marketing; 
planning, cooking and serving meals; cost of living; 
methods of preserving foods, as canning, salting, and 
preserving. 

B. Household Chemistry. — This portion of the 
Sophomore work includes a study of the following: 
Chemical substances and changes met by a house- 
keeper in her daily work; water, air, fire and fuels; 
products of combustion ; food and its functions ; chem- 
istry of starches and sugars; effect of cooking on 
starch; digestion of sugars and starches; chemistry 
and digestion of fats; chemistry and digestion of 
nitrogenous foods; cleaning; the making and use of 
soap ; use of washing soda, ammonia, kerosene, borax ; 
cleaning metals and marble; removal of stains — 
grease, ink, mildew and rust; chemistry of baking 
powder ; tests for various foods. mary m. petty. 

III. Household Sanitation and Economics. — 
This course covers the following topics: Hygiene, 
in relation to the home ; the best means of ventilation ; 
heating and lighting; the sanitary disposal of house- 
hold wastes, solids and liquids ; proper use of antisep- 
tics and detergents ; plumbing ; care of water supply ; 
systematic housekeeping; cost of living; household 
accounts; domestic service. 

IV. Teachers' Course. — Six periods a week. — 
Summer Session. 

Food and Dietetics. — Composition and nutritive 



80 The State Normal 

value of foods ; fundamental principles and processes 
of cookery; practical work in cookery; study of spec- 
ial foods; meats; milk and its products; cereals and 
their products ; breads ; vegetables, sugars, beverages ; 
methods of preserving foods. 

The study of dust and dust plants in their relation 
to the home. Friendly bacteria: — as scavengers; in 
butter-making, in cheese-making, vinegar. Harmful 
bacteria: — causing fermentation of foods, putrefac- 
tion, decay. Disease germs : — methods of prevention, 
disinfectants, sterilization, Pasteurization, sunshine 
and fresh air. Molds: — favorable and unfavorable 
conditions of growth. Yeasts : — used in bread-making, 
best conditions for growth. 

V. Housekeepers' Course. — Six periods a week. — 
Summer Session. 

Demonstrations in batters, breads, creamed dishes, 
cream soups, souffles, vegetables. 

Meat Cookery. — Demonstrations in cuts of meats, 
methods of preparing cheap meats, expensive cuts, 
left-over meats, meat substitutes; vegetable soups. 
Desserts. Trays for the sick. 

Demonstration in saving time and fuel by the use 
of steamer and fireless cooker. Paper bag cookery. 
Plans for building a fireless cooker. 

THE HOME-TRAINING COTTAGE 

In addition to the laboratory work in foods, the 
College has furnished a small cottage for the purpose 
of further training the students to meet the problems 
of the home. 

In the Home-Training Cottage, students are given 
a limited amount of money each week with which to 



and Industrial College 81 

meet the expenses of the home. With this amount all 
foods, fuel, lights and other necessary running expen- 
ses must be met. Menus and household accounts are 
kept to form the habit of looking after details, to 
teach the value of money, and to train the student to 
plan and buy simple, wholesome, well-balanced foods 
that meet the needs of the body. 

In addition to the general care and management of 
the entire house, the care of the table linen, bed linen, 
beds, bathroom, and refrigerator is placed upon the 
students. 



DOMESTIC ART DEPARTMENT 

ALMA LONG 

I. Elementary Sewing. — Four hours a week for 
one-half year. Practice in hand and machine work. 
Principles of garment drafting and construction. 
Also a short course in other forms of needlework, 
such as knitting, netting, crocheting and embroidery. 
Required in the Home Economics Course, Sophomore 
year. 

II. Dressmaking. — Four hours a week for one- 
half year. This course is a continuation of Course 
I. Simple dresses, using commercial patterns, are 
made. Required in the Home Economics Course, 
Junior year. 

III. Elementary Sewing. — Three hours a week for 
entire year. Practice in hand and machine work ap- 
plied to useful articles. Garment drafting and con- 
struction. Wash dresses. Elective in Pedagogy 
Course, Sophomore year. 



82 The State Normal 

IV. Textiles. — Two hours a week for entire year. 
A study of fabrics in their historic and economic sig- 
nificance. Lectures, collateral reading, laboratory 
work and excursions. Enquired in the Home Eco- 
nomics Course, Senior year. 

V. Teaching Domestic Art. — Two hours a week 
for one-half year. A synopsis of the subject matter of 
Domestic Art as applicable to schools of various types. 
Plans for daily work and practice in class manage- 
ment. Required in Home Economics Course, Senior 
year. 

Materials for the work in Courses I and III will 
cost about five dollars; for Course II, ten dollars 
and up, according to the student's choice of material. 
Articles made are the property of the student, subject 
to the wish of the department in regard to exhibition. 



DEPARTMENT OF RURAL ECONOMICS 

ERNEST ELWELL BALCOMB 

I. Rural Economics. Rural Outdoor Industries. 
The work in this course will include the elements of 
agriculture, dairying, poultry raising, school and home 
gardening, horticulture, planning and planting home 
grounds. An effort will be made to teach, in a vital 
way, those phases of dairying that are essential to 
those who have charge of the milk and butter for the 
family. They should realize the danger resulting 
from the unsanitary handling of these important food 
products. The College dairy herd, together with the 



and Industrial College 83 

new barn and silo, offer opportunities for such first- 
hand information as a teacher in the rural school or 
an intelligent woman in the home should have. 

Practical experience in raising farm poultry is 
gained by the operation of the small poultry plant at 
the College. 

The College campus gives a splendid opportunity 
to become familiar with the native trees of the State. 

II. Study of Rural Life. — Three hours a week. 

More and more the public is demanding that the 
school shall be a source of uplift for a community in its 
economic, social and religious relations — that it shall 
assist in educating the whole people. Especially is it 
felt that the rural school should be a source of com- 
munity uplift, and that the rural teacher, if she is to 
make her school of the greatest possible service, must 
know the people of her district intimately, and must 
be a leader in assisting them to solve their problems. 

A teacher who appreciates her real mission will do 
something to improve the health of the community; 
awaken civic pride ; relieve the physical drudgery, and 
intellectual and social barrenness which is the lot of so 
many farmers' wives and daughters, and give to the 
farm family some of the enthusiasms of life. She will 
hold community meetings, educational rally days; be 
interested in co-operative societies for buying and sell- 
ing; take a part in the organization of women's clubs 
and betterment associations; organize a school and 
community library; and take an interest in farm 
sports and athletics. 

The Study of Rural Life is intended to train teach- 
ers to make a definite, systematic study of rural condi- 
tions, with the causes, consequences and remedies ; and 
to give them training which will enable them to be 



84 The State Normal 

leaders in organizing clubs and societies, and to co-op- 
erate with this College, and other agencies working 
for the improvement of Rural Life. 

Students will be prepared to present the elements 
of agriculture in the elementary schools. Practice for 
this work is secured in the Training School. 

The work of the course will include the study of 
text-books ; reports on references to bulletins, etc. ; 
investigations of economic and social conditions of 
rural communities; a study of the work of the insti- 
tutions and societies of state and nation working for 
the improvement of rural conditions; actual practice 
in organizing and conducting rural literary societies, 
betterment associations, boys' and girls' contest clubs; 
planning exhibits and decorations for school and 
county fairs. 

III. Rural Home Life. — Two hours a week. 

A course similar to the foregoing but emphasizing 
more particularly the problems of the home rather 
than those of the school and the community. For 
Seniors in Home Economics Course. 

IV. Elementary Agriculture, Teachers' Course. — 
Five periods a week. — Summer Session. 

A course intended to give such knowledge and 
training as will enable those who take it to teach the 
elements of agriculture in the public schools, and to 
co-operate in organizing and conducting boys' and 
girls' clubs and contests for growing garden and field 
crops. 

The work will include the study of text-books; 
reports on references ; experiments in the laboratory ; 
practice in gardening; observations in field, orchard, 
garden and dairies; making collections; excursions to 



and Industrial College 85 

the Country Life Schools of Guilford County, and 
to some of the largest greenhouses and nurseries in 
the South. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

E. J. FORNEY 
CLARA BOOTH BYRD 

SHORTHAND 

The original Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand is 
taught. It is the aim of the course to make practical 
shorthand writers — amanuenses and reporters. The 
inductive method of teaching prevails, the course is 
well graded, and the student is led, step by step, 
through easy and natural stages, to see, to think, and 
to act for herself. 

The work of the department will be planned as 
far as possible to meet the needs of students. The 
course at first embraces not only a study of principles, 
but the reading and writing in shorthand of a wide 
range of English classics. As the student advances, 
in order to acquaint her with the forces and machinery 
of the business world, actual business letters bearing 
upon various subjects are dictated, reproduced on the 
typewriter, and copied in the letter book. Where it 
is deemed necessary, sentence structure and composi- 
tion in the English department of the College will be 
required. 

As a majority of our students will ultimately 
engage in amanuensis work, this feature is made the 
leading purpose of the course ; but reporting and the 
work pertaining thereto are not neglected, and when 
a student demonstrates that she can receive the higher 



86 The State Normal 

work in shorthand to advantage, such dictation is 
given as will insure power, strength, and general 
information. Technical instruction in the use of med- 
ical and legal terms is also given. 

SUGGESTED COURSES 

Group I. Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping. 
— This is the ideal course to take, if the previous 
training of the student will permit it. All accredited 
students and those who pass the College entrance 
examinations in English will be admitted to this 
course. 

Group II. Shorthand, Typewriting, English and 
Arithmetic. — This course is recommended to those 
students who are classified below the Freshman class. 
As soon as sufficient scholarship in English is acquired 
to admit to the Freshman class, Group I is recom- 
mended. 

Group HI. — Many students, in order to strengthen 
their general scholarship, return to the College for a 
second year's work. To such we recommend Short- 
hand, Typewriting, English, and some other subject. 
Music has become very attractive to many in this 
course. 

REPORTING 

A course in verbatim note-taking is offered. If a 
student demonstrates ability to do higher work in 
shorthand, actual speeches, addresses, sermons, court 
testimony, etc., are taken. In the first stages of 
reporting effort, an expert note-taker from the depart- 
ment accompanies the student and takes a check note 



and Industrial College 87 

of her work. This coaching is continued until the 
student can rely upon her own notes. 

This course is open to shorthand writers of any sys- 
tem with a speed of not less than 120 words a minute, 
provided the applicant has a thorough knowledge of 
the principles of the system written (the department 
cannot undertake to teach the elementary principles 
of any system except the Isaac Pitman) and has 
sufficient education to put into practice the expert 
work offered. 

CERTIFICATES 

The diligent student can, in from five to eight 
months, acquire a speed of 80 to 120 words a minute, 
which is sufficient to do good office work, and certifi- 
cates will be given to students who can write from dic- 
tation correctly in shorthand from new matter at these 
rates. Students must pass an examination in Arith- 
metic and preparatory English before this certificate 
will be given. 

Students will be admitted to this department at 
any time during the college year not later than March 
1st. 

Business men who may be needing stenographers 
will, upon application, be put in correspondence with 
efficient help. 

SYLLABUS OF WORK IN SHORTHAND 

Session of 34 Weeks, 170 Days 
(The books are taken up in the order named) 

Inductive Lessons Ch. 1 to 35 To develop reading 

power 

Aesop's Fables 48 pages To fix small words 

Easy Readings 32 pages To extend word-power 

Phonetic Reader 21 pages To increase vocabulary 

Business Cor. 2 60 letters Read and Copied 

Business Cor. 1 60 letters Read and Copied 

Inductive Lessons Ch. 36 to 54 \ a+,,/1^ ^t •„„•,„„ 

and Select Readings 1 and 2 f Stu ^ of P«nciples 

Pitman's Text-book Shorth'd only Study of principles 



88 The State Normal 



Vicar of Wakefield 280 pages Read only 

Universal Die. Course 15 businesses Dictated to students 

Self-Culture (Blackie) 90 pages To increase reading 

power 
Key to Reporting Ex. 48 pages Study of contractions 

Gleanings 1 and 2 64 pages Reporting style 

Selections No. 3 45 pages Reporting style 

High. Speed in Sh. 32 pages Dictated to students 

Inductive Lessons 54 Ch. Review of principles 

Pitman's Text-book Complete Review of principles 

Universal Die. Course 10 businesses Dictated to students 

10 Reporters' Readers 20 lectures Sight reading; own 

notes 
Pitman's Jour. (Bath) 1 copy daily Shorth'd and editorial 

Sel. from Am. Authors Read and copied 

In addition to the above, beginning with the reading of Self-Cul- 
ture and running through the course to the end, dictation of 1500 
letters collected by the department, legal papers, specifications, etc., 
is a constant feature of the work. 

SHORTHAND— Home Study 

There are many young men and women who would 
probably like to take advantage of a course of sys- 
tematic work at home. To all such the commercial 
department will, upon request, outline a course of 
home work. All exercises sent to the College will be 
criticised and corrected, the only requirement being 
that the postage both ways be paid. This course of 
home work is constructed to produce results; therefore, 
it will take time and energy. In order to make the 
course as strong as possible, the complete outline 
includes the use of a number of books, the cost of 
which the student must bear. But in order to give 
students an opportunity to test their power before 
expending money for books, the department has issued 
a small pamphlet containing ten easy, well-graded les- 
sons, which will be forwarded to any one upon appli- 
cation. 

TYPEWRITING 

The Underwood typewriters are the machines most 
used, though a few of other standard makes are kept 
for practice. Twenty-three instruments are owned by 
the department. Skill in the use of the machines is 
not the only design of the instruction. Special atten- 



and Industrial College 89 

tion is paid to accuracy, neatness, vocabulary, spell- 
ing, punctuation, and paragraphing. The instruction 
is purely practical. 

BOOKKEEPING 

The course in bookkeeping and business practice 
is similar to that which can be obtained in progressive 
commercial colleges. The inductive method of pres- 
entation prevails. Each transaction is presented to 
the student as much like the performance of actual 
business as possible. The student is taught self- 
reliance from the start. The course from the business 
standpoint is a comprehensive one; it will make not 
only bookkeepers, but well-informed business women 
thoroughly conversant with all kinds of common com- 
mercial forms and blanks. The arrangement of the 
books and blanks is such that the subject can be taught 
with ease in schools of lower grades. 

The Burroughs Adding Machine is a part of the 
equipment, and all students in bookkeeping are re- 
quired to become familiar with its workings. The 
loose-leaf methods so universally recognized today, 
form the basis of the course. 

The higher work in bookkeeping represents the 
best practice of expert accountants of this country, 
and students are taught the uses of special books 
adapted to many important lines of commerce. 

The expenses of the student taking the business 
courses for a term of thirty-five weeks are : 

If boarding in the dormitory $195.00 

If boarding in the city 65.00* 

The above amount includes all college fees for lights, heat, 
books, etc. (See page 95 for details of payment.) 



* Can be reduced to 142.50 if the student passes satisfactory exam- 
inations on English. 



90 The State Normal 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

MARY M. PETTY, CHAIRMAN 

This department has been organized for the pur- 
pose of serving the people of North Carolina who are 
unable to attend established educational institutions. 
It has assumed for its particular work the betterment 
of the home and school. The work is primarily educa- 
tional, and it is to be borne in mind that the College 
has no desire or intention of establishing a mere enter- 
tainment bureau. In pursuance of its plan the Insti- 
tution offers assistance in the following suggestive lines 
of work : 

I. To the Clubs: 

1. In the formation of club programs and in secur- 
ing material for the carrying out of these programs, 
both by the loan of books and by lectures on various 
subjects pertaining to the programs. 

2. In the organization of clubs in the community, 
particularly among the women, for the study of Do- 
mestic Economy, including the house, food, clothing, 
sanitation for home and community. 

3. Bulletins for distribution and loan. 

4. A loan library of books on matters concerning 
food, sanitation, house furnishing, and decoration. 

5. Lectures and Talks: 

Bacteria in Health and Disease ; Palatable Dishes 
at Moderate Cost ; The Cheaper Cuts of Meats ; Bread ; 
Chemistry of Common Things; Food Adulteration; 
Literary lectures (Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Tenny- 
son, Browning, Arnold, Kipling, Whittier, Lanier) 
under the auspices of the English Department ; read- 



and Industrial College 91 

ings from the best authors; helps in planning enter- 
tainments and plays. 

II. To the Schools: 

Improvement in School Houses and Grounds; 
Choice of Pictures for the School Room; School 
Library; School Sanitation; Physical Exercises and 
Games; Illustrated Lectures; Economics; Co-Opera- 
tion for the Development of the School ; North Caro- 
lina History. 

III. To the Home: 

The Home Service Department offers suggestions 
for — 

1. Erection or remodeling of the home. 

2. Criticism of proposed plans for the home. 

3. Exterior and interior decoration of the home. 

4. Lighting and heating appliances. 

5. Sanitation or sewerage system for the home. 

Consultation by correspondence in all matters 
included in the above is cordially invited. Address 
Extension Department, State Normal College, Greens- 
boro, N. C. 



92 



The State Normal 



COUNTY APPOINTMENTS 

THE DORMITORIES 

Under a regulation conforming to the Charter of 
the Institution, free tuition is offered to any young 
woman who will promise to teach for two years in the 
public or private schools of the State. The capacity 
of the dormitories is limited, however, and, in order 
that every county may have representation in the 
College, about two hundred places in the dormitories 
have been apportioned among the several counties of 
the State in proportion to their white school popula- 
tion. Dormitory appointments are also given to those 
young women who prefer to pay tuition, the money 
thus derived being used to enlarge and better equip 
the dormitories and other departments of the College. 

The dormitories have been fitted up by the State 
and board is furnished at actual cost. If the amount 
collected from the students be more than sufficient 
to maintain this department, the balance will be 
refunded. The law does not permit any profit to be 
made on the boarding department. 

The following indicates the number of free-tuition appoint- 
ments to which each county is entitled: 



3 Alamance 


2 Caldwell 


1 Currituck 


2 Alexander 


1 Camden 


1 Dare 


1 Alleghany 


1 Cartaret 


3 Davidson 


2 Anson 


1 Caswell 


2 Davie 


3 Ashe 


3 Catawba 


2 Duplin 


2 Avery 


2 Chatham 


3 Durham 


2 Beaufort 


2 Cherokee 


2 Edgecombe 


1 Bertie 


"I Chowan 


4 Forsyth 


1 Bladen 


1 Clay 


2 Franklin 


1 Brunswick 


3 Cleveland 


4 Gaston 


5 Buncombe 


2 Columbus 


1 Gates 


2 Burke 


2 Craven 


1 Graham 


3 Cabarrus 


3 Cumberland 


2 Granville 



and Industrial College 



93 



1 Greene 


3 


Mitchell 


3 


Eutherford 


5 Guilford 


2 


Montgomery 


2 


Sampson 


2 Halifax 


2 


Moore 


1 


Scotland 


2 Harnett 


2 


Nash 


2 


Stanly 


2 Haywood 


2 


New Hanover 


2 


Stokes 


2 Henderson 


1 


Northampton 


3 


Surry 


1 Hertford 


1 


Onslow 


1 


Swain 


2 Hoke 


1 


Orange 


1 


Transylvania 


1 Hyde 


1 


Pamlico 


1 


Tyrrell 


3 Iredell 


1 


Pasquotank 


3 


Union 


2 Jackson 


1 


Pender 


2 


Vance 


4 Johnston 


1 


Perquimans 


4 


Wake 


1 Jones 


1 


Person 


1 


Warren 


2 Lee 


2 


Pitt 


1 


Washington 


2 Lenoir 


1 


Polk 


2 


Watauga 


2 Lincoln 


3 


Eandolph 


3 


Wayne 


2 Macon 


1 


Eichmond 


4 


Wilkes 


3 Madison 


3 


Eobeson 


2 


Wilson 


1 Martin 


3 


Eockingham 


2 


Yancey 


2 McDowell 


4 


Eowan 


2 


Yadkin 


4 Mecklenburg 











APPLICATIONS FOR COUNTY APPOINTMENTS 



If the number of applicants from any county does 
not exceed the number to which it is entitled, appoint- 
ments to places in the dormitories will be made with- 
out examination. If, however, it should be found 
necessary, a competitive examination, prepared by the 
Faculty, will be held at the county seat about August 
1st. 

All applications for the county appointments 
should be in the hands of the President before July 
15th. 

Students who receive appointments can hold them 
until they complete the course, provided their conduct 
and progress are satisfactory to the Faculty. 

Any county appointments not applied for by 
August 1st, will be given to the applicants from other 
counties, preference being given to the following 
classes: 



94 The State Normal 

1. Those who have spent a year or more at this 
College, and whose conduct and studious habits have 
commended them to the Faculty. 

2. Graduates of other colleges for young women. 
This is done in order to prevent graduates from 
entering the competitive examinations against younger 
and less mature scholars in their own counties and 
because these graduates can be prepared in a shorter 
time to begin teaching in the schools of the State. 

3. The best material among new applicants. 



and Industrial College 95 



EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 

REGULAR COX7RSE 

By the Charter of the Institution, board must be 
furnished in its dormitories at actual cost. Since 
there is no possible profit in board, no risk of loss can 
be taken. It is, therefore, necessary that all bills be 
paid in advance. No exceptions can be made. The 
Board of Directors instructs that sight draft be made 
for all bills not paid when due. 

Board in the dormitories $104.00 

Laundry 18.00 

$122.00 

Fuel and Lights $ 10.00 

Dormitory Fee 2.00 

Registration Fee 4.00 

Medical and Physical Training Fee . . 5.00 
For use of Text-books and Apparatus 5.00 
Library Fee 2.00 

28.00 

Total, exclusive of tuition $150.00 

Tuition 45.00 

Total, including tuition $195.00 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will 
be due as follows, in advance : 

For students who board in the dormitories and 
have free tuition : 

*On entrance $45.00 

November 14th 40.00 

January 15th 35.00 

March 15th 30.00 

$150.00 



* New students, in addition to this amount, must deposit with the 
Treasurer $6.00 with which to purchase a gymnasium outfit. 



96 The State Normal 

For students who board in dormitories and pay 
tuition : 

*On entrance $60.00 

November 14th 50.00 

January 15th 45.00 

March 15th 40.00 

$195.00 

For students who have free tuition and do not 
board in dormitories : 

*On entrance $15.00 

January 15th 5.00 

$ 20.00 

For students who pay tuition and do not board in 
dormitories : 

*On entrance $25.00 

November 14th 15.00 

January 15th 15.00 

March 15th 10.00 

$ 65.00 

In addition to the above, for students taking 
Instrumental or Special Vocal Music : 

On entrance $15.00 

November 14th 10.00 

January 15th 10.00 

March 15th 10.00 

$ 45.00 



* New students, in addition to this amount, must deposit with the 
Treasurer $6.00 with whieh to purchase a gymnasium outfit. 



and Industrial College 97 



LABORATORY FEES 

To defray in part the cost of materials actually 

consumed by the student in her laboratory work, the 

following annual fees, payable upon admission to the 

courses herein named, will be charged : 

Biology, $1.00; Chemistry, $1.00; Domestic Art, $1.00; 
Domestic Science, $1.00; Manual Arts — Junior and Senior, 
$1.00 each; Physics, $2.00. 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

The only necessary additional expenses at the Col- 
lege will be $6.00 for gymnasium outfit, which amount 
must be deposited with the Bursar on entrance ; Lec- 
ture and Eecital fee of $2.00 (see page 110) ; the 
cost of medicine in case of illness, and, for graduates, 
a diploma fee of $5.00. 

NON-RESIDENTS 

No free tuition is given to a non-resident of the 
State, but a tuition charge of $65, instead of $45, is 
made. 

SPECIAL BUSINESS COURSES 

To any student not boarding in the dormitories, 
the charges for a special course in Stenography will 
be $22.50 for tuition and the regular fees, $20. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

The charges for the collegiate year in Applied 
Music are as follows : 

Regular Students: 

Two private lessons a week in Piano, Organ, Voice, or 

Violin $40.00 

For use of piano one practice period a day 5.00 

For each additional daily practice period 4.00 

Organ practice, one period daily 8.00 

Each additional daily practice period 5.00 



98 The State Normal 

Special Students: 

Students who register for some form of Applied Music 
only (Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin) pay $50.00. This is pay- 
able $30.00 on entrance; $20.00 at the beginning of the Spring 
term. 

SUMMER SESSION 

There will be no charge for tuition in any of the 
Summer Session courses. The charges for board, 
laundry, registration, medical attention, use of library 
and text-books, will be as follows : 

For students who board and room in the College 
dormitories : 

Eight weeks $40.00 

Six weeks 35.00 

Two weeks 12.00 

For students who do not board and room in the 
dormitories : 

Eight weeks $10.00 

Six weeks 10.00 

Two weeks (Eegistration Fee) 3.00 

All Summer Session dues and fees are payable on 
entrance. 

TEXTBOOKS 

The students are not required to bring any text- 
books. The College will, for the book fee, furnish the 
use of all ordinary text-books. But it might be help- 
ful if students would bring a good English Dictionary 
and other useful reference books in their possession. 
Latin, French, or German lexicons, when needed, 
must be purchased by the student. 



and Industrial. College 99 

In all business matters the College prefers to deal 
directly with the students, rather than with their 
parents or guardians. This gives them business expe- 
rience and makes them realize the cost of their 
training. 

All students are supposed to matriculate for the 
full year, and must not expect any fees or dues re- 
mitted on account of their irregularities, or change in 
plans, except in case of serious illness, making it 
necessary for the resident physician to advise them to 
return home. 

Let all checks and money orders be made payable 
to E. J. Forney, Treasurer. 

FREE TUITION 

The State Normal and Industrial College offers no 
scholarships. The only students who can have free 
tuition are those ' ' who signify their intentions to teach 
upon such conditions as may be prescribed by the 
Board of Directors". Part of the dormitory space 
is reserved for tuition-paying students, and part for 
free-tuition students. Each student applying for free 
tuition must sign the following 

AGREEMENT 

"I seek the opportunities of the State Normal and Indus- 
trial College because it is my desire and intention to make 
teaching my profession, and I agree, in consideration of free 
tuition granted me in said Institution, if I can secure employ- 
ment and my health permits, to teach in the public or private 
schools of the State for at least two years after I leave the 
College. If within three years from the time I leave the Col- 
lege, I fail to teach as herein stated, from any fault of mine, 
which shall be decided by the Board of Directors or the Execu- 
tive Committee, I agree to pay the College full tuition with 
interest for the time I attended. I furthermore agree that 
until this pledge shall have been fulfilled, I will report to the 
College, in May of each year after I leave it, the amount of 
teaching work I have done. ' ' 



100 The State Normal 



LOAN FUNDS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

THE ALUMNAE LOAN AND SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

For the purpose of establishing a few scholarships 
for post-graduate work, and for making loans to 
worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, who 
could not return to the College without aid, the Alum- 
nae Association has undertaken to raise a fund. This 
fund now amounts to about $15,000. 

THE JARVIS BUXTON LOAN FUND 

This fund, now amounting to $100, is established 
by Mrs. J. C. Buxton, of Winston, N. C, in memory 
of her little son, who, notwithstanding the fact that 
he was an invalid all his life, had accumulated this 
amount of money before his death. 

THE ADELAIDE WORTH DANIELS FUND 

This fund, amounting to $100, has been established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels in memory of their 
little daughter, and is to be used as a loan fund to 
worthy students. 

THE LIDA CARR LOAN FUND 

This fund was established by General and Mrs. 
Julian S. Carr. 

THE McIVER LOAN FUND 

As a memorial to the founder and first president of 
the College, the Alumnae Association is raising The 
Mclver Loan Fund. The amount raised in each 
county will be credited to it and used in aiding worthy 
students from that particular county. Contributions 
to this fund are now coming in. Fifty-six students 



and Industrial College 101 

have received loans from this fund during the last 
three years. 

THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE 
CONFEDERACY SCHOLARSHIP 

The North Carolina Division of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy offers two scholarships 
to descendants of Confederate veterans. These schol- 
arships are worth about $125.00 each. 

THE SARAH AND EVELYN BAILEY SCHOLARSHIP 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Bailey, whose only children 
died while students at this College, have established 
a permanent scholarship to be known as The Sarah 
and Evelyn Bailey Scholarship. 

ELIZABETH CROW MAHLER FUND 

This fund, amounting to $100, represents a recent 
contribution to the loan funds of the College. The 
interest therefrom is to be used at the discretion of 
the President, in aiding worthy students. 

OTHER LOAN FUNDS 

Charles Broadway Rouss, of New York, gave 
$100 to be used as a loan fund to the daughter of a 
Confederate soldier. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. Everit Macy, of New York, gave 
$1,000 to be used as a loan fund. 

The late Judge John Gray Bynum bequeathed to 
the College $1,000, known as the Hennie Bynum 
Scholarship, to be used as a loan fund for the aid of 
some young woman from Burke County. 

Mr. Joe Rosenthal gave $200 to be used in aiding 
needy students. 

Mr. Ceasar Cone gave $100 to the Mclver Loan 
Fund. 



102 The State Normal 



GOVERNMENT 

Those who board in the College are under the 
direct care of the President, the Lady Principal, and 
her assistants. The general policy in regard to govern- 
ment has been to trust the students and appeal to their 
honor and sense of propriety. It is but simple justice 
to say that they have responded to these appeals with 
a loyalty and faithfulness worthy of the highest praise. 
Vexatious and needless restrictions are dispensed with. 
The regulations made in regard to conduct and study 
hours have been the result of a consultation with the 
students, and of a practically unanimous vote in their 
favor. The students are responsible for the prepara- 
tion of their lessons, but they can do their studying 
either in the Assembly Hall or in their private rooms. 
The object is to throw responsibility upon the students 
and to make them, as nearly as practicable, a self- 
governing body. This sense of responsibility is one 
of the educative forces of the College. Under certain 
conditions it might be found necessary to modify the 
method of discipline, but where many of the students 
are themselves teachers, where about one-third are 
defraying their own expenses, and where the average 
age is nearly twenty years, the sober judgment of the 
students can generally be relied upon to produce a 
public sentiment that will result in right conduct and 
honest work. 

Each student, when she registers, is required to 
sign the following contract : 

CONTRACT 

I do hereby contract with the State Normal and Industrial 
College that so long as I shall remain a student of the College, 
I will endeavor to comply cheerfully with all its regulations 



and Industrial College 103 



in all particulars, and I agree not to deface or injure, by writing 
or otherwise, any of its furniture, books or other property. 
Moreover, if I should accidentally do damage to any property 
of the College, I hereby agree to report it promptly to the 
President, or, in case it should be dormitory property, I agree 
to report it to the lady in charge of the building where the 
damage is done, in order that it may be properly assessed, and 
that I may pay for the same. 

Compliance with the foregoing contract requires 
promptness in attendance upon every meeting of stu- 
dents in chapel, dining-room, at recitations, or else- 
where, from the date of the opening of the College to 
the last exercise of the Commencement. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Reports of the standing of all students in their 
studies are sent to parents or guardians twice a year. 
The reports are based upon the following system of 
marking : 

Grade 1, 95-100 per cent. Grade 4, 70-80 per cent. 

Grade 2, 90-95 per cent. Grade 5, 60-70 per cent. 

Grade 3, 80-90 per cent. Grade 6, below 60 per ct. 

Students must attain a grade of 4 to pass in any 
study. Grade 5 indicates that the student is con- 
ditioned, but will be given another opportunity to 
remove the deficiency. Students receiving grade 6 in 
any study must take such study again. 



104 The State Normal 



General Information 



AN EDUCATIONAL CENTER 

The State Normal and Industrial College and its 
friends are to be congratulated upon its location. 

Greensboro is one of the prosperous, growing cities 
of the country. Its healthfulness is well known, and 
its social and religious influences are the best. Its 
accessibility and the hospitality and progressive spirit 
of its people render it the favorite convention city of 
the State. A week seldom passes in which it has not 
as its guests, some body of eminent men and women 
assembled in the interest of matters of public concern. 
Students in the College thus enjoy exceptional advan- 
tages for coming in contact with prominent state and 
national leaders, and in gaining an intelligent concep- 
tion of the more important problems relating to the 
life and welfare of our people. The churches, the 
schools and colleges, the libraries, hospitals, and other 
agencies for civic and social betterment add immensely 
to the opportunities for liberal culture. The woman 
who spends a year or more in this environment gains 
a broader conception of life and adds to her qualifica- 
tions for usefulness. The city has long been an edu- 
cational center. Its people and the people of Guilford 
County are liberal friends of public education, and 
have always been strong advocates of the education of 
women. The public schools of Greensboro are well 



and Industrial College 105 

equipped, and do efficient work, giving boys and girls 
a thorough preparation for college. There are few 
towns or cities where the educational advantages are 
so excellent and may be had at such small cost. 

There is another important reason why the Col- 
lege is fortunately located. To the entire people of the 
State, Greensboro is the most accessible of North Caro- 
lina towns. It is the geographical and railroad center 
of the State. The North Carolina Railroad, the North- 
western North Carolina Railroad, main line of the 
Southern Railway, and the Atlantic and Yadkin Rail- 
way, meet at Greensboro. 

The schedule time to Greensboro from Raleigh, 
Fayetteville, Durham, Winston-Salem, Mount Airy, 
Statesville, Salisbury, and Charlotte, is from one to 
four hours. 

One can leave Weldon, Goldsboro, Tarboro, Wil- 
son, Maxton, Hamlet, Wilkesboro, Asheville, or Hot 
Springs in the morning and reach Greensboro by bed- 
time. 

Students who leave Wilmington at 9 :00 a. m., and 
those who take the early trains at Murphy, Morehead 
City, and the railroad stations in the most remote cor- 
ners of the State, will meet in Greensboro in the after- 
noon or evening of the same day. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The College buildings, fifteen in number, are 
located on an eminence partly within and partly with- 
out the city limits. The grounds are both spacious and 
attractive. Ten acres, fronting on a paved and mac- 
adamized thoroughfare, are laid out and cared for in 
accordance with the plans of landscape gardeners. 
This constitutes the campus proper. Electric cars, 



106 The State Normal 

operated on a ten-minute schedule and having three 
stopping points in front of the grounds, afford ready 
access to the railway station and to all points of inter- 
est in the city and its suburbs. A private avenue with 
macadam walks leads through the grounds to the sev- 
eral college buildings. A woodland park of twenty- 
five acres, covered with a natural forest growth of rare 
beauty, is the private property of the College. Sev- 
eral miles of walkways, a pavilion, and numerous rus- 
tic bridges add to the charm and comfort of this 
fresh air recreation ground. Ample space is allotted 
to tennis, basketball and other forms of athletic sports. 
The college buildings have been specially designed 
for their several purposes and represent the best in 
material and equipment. They are properly lighted 
and ventilated, have adequate fire protection, are 
warmed by a central heating plant, supplied with san- 
itary drinking fountains, hot and cold water, local and 
long distance telephones, and gas and electric lights. 
The buildings include : 

Administration Building. — Offices of President, 
Dean, Secretary, Bursar, Registrar, Stenographer, 
Laboratories, Student Rest Rooms, Postoffice, and 
eighteen Lecture Rooms. 

Library. — Fire-proof Book Room, Vault, Offices, 
Reading Room, Reference and Study Rooms. 

Students' Building. — Manual Arts — six rooms; 
two Literary Society Halls, Young Women's Christian 
Association Hall and Reading Room, College Auditor- 
ium, and fifteen Music Rooms. 

Spencer Building. — Main Dormitory, 492 feet 
long, facing east on College Avenue; North wing ex- 



and Industrial College 107 

tension, 120 feet ; South wing, facing on Walker Ave- 
nue, 240 feet. Kitchen, Cold Storage, and Central 
Dining Hall with accommodations for 600. Total dor- 
mitory capacity of this building, including rooms for 
matron and assistants, 390. 

Woman's Building. — Dormitory modern in all its 
equipment, and embodying the best features of build- 
ings of its class. Dedicated by Act of the General 
Assembly of 1911, to the women of the Confederacy. 
Accommodations for sixty students. 

Dormitory. — New building, accommodations for 
sixty students. Similar in all respects to the Woman's 
Building. 

Guilford Hall Dormitory. — Accommodations for 
seventy students. 

Curry Building. — Teachers' Training School, 
Practice School Building, Offices, Assembly Hall, Play 
Room, and twelve Class Rooms. Devoted exclusively 
to the work of the Normal Department. 

M elver Memorial Building. — Thirty-two Lecture 
Rooms, Laboratories and Offices, especially designed 
for the Science Departments. 

Infirmary. — New building, seventy-five bed capac- 
ity. Modern in construction and arrangement. 
Thoroughly equipped. Laboratories, Operating and 
Consultation Rooms, Solaria, Outdoor Rooms, Physi- 
cian's and Nurses' Rooms, Dining-Room and Kitchen. 

Music Studio. — Two-story brick cottage used by 
students of the Music Department. 

Home-Training Cottage. — Two-story frame cottage 
equipped to give students of Domestic Science practice 



108 The State Normal 

in house-keeping, in home-making, in purchasing pro- 
visions, planning, cooking and serving meals, and in 
cleaning up and caring for the house. 

Power House, Laundry, Central Heating Plant, 
Dairy, and Mechanic Shops. 

President's Residence. 

THE LIBRARY 

ANNIE F. PETTY 

MARY MULLEN 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

The library is one of the distinctly educative forces 
of the College. Those in whom its management is 
vested consider that it has a mission to perform other 
than that of mere adjunct to departmental work. 
Efforts are made to render it a vital force in the life 
of each student. To be educated in the friendship 
of books — to derive that solace and inspiration and 
strength that come from restful, friendly communion 
with the world's choice spirits — is no insignificant 
part of woman's education. Denied this perennial 
source of wisdom, culture and sympathy, a woman 
misses one of the most potent agencies in her own 
development and an effective means of appeal to 
others. 

The library building, a model of comfort and con- 
venience, is the gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie. Care 
has been taken to select such books as are most service- 
able to students in their work in the various depart- 
ments. Students have access, under necessary limita- 
tions, to the book-shelves. Facilities are offered for 
reading and study during library hours, and the 
librarian is present to give help in any line of special 



and Industrial College 109 

study or reading. The library now contains more 
than seven thousand volumes, and valuable additions 
are annually being made by purchase and donations. 
Special effort is being made to secure any works on 
North Carolina History. Old volumes, magazines, 
pamphlets, newspapers — all materials relating to the 
history and literature of the State — will be acceptable. 

The Reading Room is supplied with the best cur- 
rent literature, including state and national papers, 
leading magazines, reviews, and educational journals. 

The library is open on week-days, except Saturday, 
from 8:30 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. The Saturday hours 
are from 8 :30 a. m. to 5 :00 p. m. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

With regard to the social management of the dor- 
mitories the authorities consider it essential that the 
young women have every privilege consistent with 
student life. Shopping, visiting, and receiving 
friends to a reasonable extent are not prohibited, but 
no night may be spent out of the dormitories without 
a written request from parents or guardians, and even 
then, permission will not be granted if, in the judg- 
ment of the authorities, it would be unwise to do so. 

Under proper conditions, visits from gentlemen 
will be allowed, when written requests for that priv- 
ilege are made by parent or guardian addressed 
directly to the Lady Principal. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Though unsectarian in its management, the College 
is distinctly Christian. Students are urged to attend 
the church of that denomination which it is their 
custom to attend when at home. The churches in 



110 The State Normal 

Greensboro are Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Congrega- 
tional, Episcopal, Friends, Lutheran, Methodist, 
Methodist Protestant, Moravian, Presbyterian, Prim- 
itive Baptist, Reformed, and Jewish Synagogue. The 
several pastors of the city churches are cordially in- 
vited to visit the Institution in order that they may 
become personally acquainted with the students and 
strengthen their religious life by helpful talks and 
conferences. 

Prayers, with the reading of the Scriptures, and 
singing, are a part of each day's exercises. Attend- 
ance on this service is required. 

Under the auspices of the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association courses are offered in Mission and 
Bible Study. The Association also provides for daily 
religious services. A more extended account of the 
work of the Association will be found on page 117. 

GENERAL CULTURE 

Students should breathe an atmosphere that will 
promote growth. The College, in addition to its regu- 
lar work, seeks in various ways to promote the general 
culture of its students. Lectures are given from time 
to time by members of the faculty, and addresses 
made by prominent men and women, whose presence 
and whose messages are an inspiration to right think- 
ing and right living. 

LECTURE AND RECITAL COURSE 

There will be given every year at the College a 
series of lectures by men of recognized standing in the 
literary and scientific world and recitals by distin- 
guished music artists. A fee of $2.00, collected at the 



and Industrial College 111 

time of registration, gives admission to the entire 
series of lectures. 

SPIRIT OF DEMOCRACY 

A large measure of the success which has attended 
the State Normal and Industrial College has been due 
to the representative character and spirit of the young 
women who have been its students. They have come 
from all of the one hundred counties of the State, and 
in their political and religious faith, their financial 
condition, and professional and social life, have been 
thoroughly representative of the people of North Caro- 
lina. Among them have been three hundred gradu- 
ates of leading female colleges and more than a thous- 
and who taught school before entering the Institution. 
In fact, the College has had every type of respectable 
woman in North Carolina, from the one who enjoyed 
all the advantages which money and social position 
confer, to the girl whose absence from her humble 
home meant increased toil and self-denial to every 
member of the family. 

A large number of these young women remain in 
the College at their own expense, without help from 
parents, and a majority of them expect to become 
teachers. This has exerted a strong influence in favor 
of industry and the steady performance of duty. 
Moreover, the fact that the College has not depended 
upon the revenue derived from any class of its stu- 
dents has tended to aid in its discipline, and to imbue 
all the students with a spirit of democracy. The State 
is always the gainer when its teachers can be trained 
in an atmosphere of equality which recognizes the 
worth of honest toil and faithful service, regardless 
of class distinctions. This coming together of all 



112 The State Normal 

classes from all sections of the State fosters patriotism, 
self-reliance, and breadth of vision, gives the students 
a clear comprehension of the needs of their State, 
and inspires them with a laudable ambition to be of 
some service. The spirit of the College is, therefore, 
worthy of the State of North Carolina. With a 
seriousness of purpose nowhere surpassed and an 
earnest yet kindly striving for the higher standards 
of life and thought, here annually gather, on equal 
terms, more than six hundred North Carolina women. 
Here is no hatred of wealth, and no contempt for pov- 
erty, but courteous recognition of equal rights with 
cheerful tribute paid to moral and intellectual worth. 

SERVICE 

Some indication of the serviceableness of the Col- 
lege is suggested by what has been said of the scope 
and character of its patronage. It has, since its estab- 
lishment, been an open door of opportunity to the 
white women of North Carolina. Through it the State 
has added to its resources over 3000 educated women 
who have taught lessons of patriotism and right living 
to more than 200,000 North Carolina children. Two- 
thirds of all the students enrolled and nine-tenths of 
all who graduate become teachers in North Carolina. 
No large movement for the uplift of the State has 
failed to have support from its faculty and students, 
and today there is not a county in the State where 
representatives of the College are not to be found 
actively engaged in public service. There is no kind 
of educational institution requirng women teachers 
with ordinary professional training, where students of 
the State Normal and Industrial College have not been 
employed. Of course the largest class of teachers 



and Industrial College 113 

trained by the Institution have gone to the country 
public and private schools, but more than thirty per 
cent, of the women teachers in the graded schools of 
the State are former students of the College, and its 
graduates have been employed in every orphanage, 
and in a large number of high schools, seminaries, and 
colleges. 

EXTENSION WORK 

In addition to its bulletin service described else- 
where in this catalogue, and the correspondence 
courses of the commercial department, the College 
undertakes each year some form of work which is, in 
effect, the carrying of its resources to those beyond its 
walls. During the past session, a series of extension 
lectures have been delivered at representative points 
chiefly under the auspices of the Federation of 
Women's Clubs of North Carolina. 

An outline of the work of the Extension Depart- 
ment will be found on pages 90-91. 

HEALTH AND MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The physical welfare of the students is made a 
prime object of attention. An experienced woman 
physician has charge of matters pertaining to health, 
and her lectures on sanitary science and personal 
hygiene form part of the required course of study. 
Trained nurses are also regularly employed. The 
physician and nurses may be consulted day or night. 
The cost of the medical consultation and attendance is 
included in the published expenses. In this way med- 
ical advice is to be had at the least cost, and the danger 
obviated of any student's postponing for economical 
reasons the necessary consultation. 



114 The State Normal 

A regular outdoor walking period is observed, 
healthful open-air sports are encouraged, and, under 
the direction of teachers of physical training, each 
student is required to take prescribed forms of phys- 
ical exercise. 

The prevention of sickness is the main object of 
physicians, nurses, and directors of Physical Culture. 
With the enlarged facilities afforded by the new 
infirmary, it is hoped to prevent cases of physical 
breakdown on the part of students by transferring 
them, when necessary, to quiet rooms where they will 
be subject to individual dieting and special care. 

In the boarding department the daily menus are 
made out and the dining room supervised by a trained 
dietitian. A matron-in-charge is responsible for the 
purchase, storage, and proper preparation of food 
materials. The sewerage and water systems, the bath 
rooms and lavatories, the heating and ventilating 
machinery and the laundry are carefully inspected. 
All drinking water is thoroughly sterilized; care is 
exercised in regard to the milk and butter supply; 
proper ventilation of dormitory and recitation rooms 
is insisted upon; and due precaution is taken to pre- 
vent the origin and spread of infectious diseases. 

A committee appointed by the State Board of 
Health visits and inspects the Institution. 

REPORT OF STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

North Carolina State Board of Health, 
Raleigh, N. C, Dec. 30, 1912. 
Board op Directors, State Normal and Industrial 
College, Greensboro, N. C. : 

Gentlemen: In accordance with Section 3, Chap- 
ter 62, Public Laws of 1911, I made an inspection of 



and Industrial College 115 

the State Normal and Industrial College on November 
26th. As in my previous annual inspections, I found 
this Institution and all of its buildings, laboratories, 
rooms, etc., orderly and sanitary. For cleanliness and 
order the Institution is a model. 

Very respectfully yours, 
W. S. Rankin, Secretary. 

SOME DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE 
COLLEGE 

The College has several features which are not 
common to all colleges for women. Among them may 
be mentioned : 

1. The dormitories have been fitted up by the 
State and board is furnished at actual cost. 

2. Regular courses of study have been arranged 
with a special view to preparing young women to 
teach. 

3. All candidates for the teaching profession 
must, during the Senior year, spend a part of each day 
in teaching under the supervision and kindly criticism 
of heads of departments or supervising teachers in the 
Training School. 

4. Departmental courses, designed especially 
for teachers, are offered in Freehand Drawing, Vocal 
and Instrumental Music, Domestic Science, Nature 
Study, Physics, Chemistry, School Gardening, and 
Manual Arts. 

5. All students have an opportunity of taking 
courses in Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Home Dec- 
oration, Elementary Agriculture, Physical Training, 
and Household Biology. 

6. A Summer Session, constituting one of the reg- 
ular college terms, offers a variety of courses, many of 



116 The State Normal, 

which may be counted towards a degree. This places 
the full resources of the Institution — faculty, build- 
ings, libraries, and laboratories — at the service of those 
who may wish to devote part of their summer to col- 
lege work. 

7. Under no circumstances can any student 
receive free tuition without taking the pledge to teach 
for at least two years after leaving the College. 

8. Nine-tenths of the young women who have 
received the College diploma have taught since their 
graduation. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

There are a number of organizations among the 
students, and it is a mistake from any standpoint for 
a young woman to come to the College and not belong 
to one or more of them. The expense connected with 
membership is not large and the advantages are very 
great in many ways. 

ADELPHIAN AND CORNELIAN SOCIETIES 

These are two literary organizations of strength 
and usefulness, both to the College and to the indi- 
vidual members. They are managed by the students 
themselves, and members of the Faculty have no con- 
nection with them except honorary membership. 
After observing for several years the general progress 
of those students who are members of these societies, 
and those who are not, the authorities of the College 
do not hesitate to say that it is a great mistake for a 
student not to become a member. Besides the literary 
work, they give to students a training in self-control 
and in the power to influence others, which the regular 
work of the College cannot give. 

The Board of Directors prohibits any other secret 
organizations. 



and Industrial College 117 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

General Secretary .... Jane Taylor Miller, A. B., B. D. 

President Mary Worth 

Vice-President . . . Mazie Kirkpatrick 

Secretary Annie Scott 

Treasurer Hallie Beavers 

Among the most potent forces in any college com- 
munity are those which the students themselves ini- 
tiate, and it is significant that there is among stu- 
dents a movement, nation-wide, which unites their 
efforts in the name of Christianity. Among the 
women students it is known as the Young Women's 
Christian Association. 

The aim of the Association in the State Normal 
College is to make a better Christian of every stu- 
dent who bears the name, to make the Christian life 
comprehensible and compellingly attractive to those 
students who have not yet found their way into it, 
and to make the community life of the College truly 
Christian. 

In 1911 this Association became a part of the 
National Young Women 's Christian Association whose 
aim is: to unite in one body all like associations of 
the United States ; to establish, develop and unify such 
associations ; to participate in the work of the world 's 
association; to advance the physical, social, intellec- 
tual, moral and spiritual interests of young women. 

The Christian leaders in the world are generally 
college men and women. The student association 
gives a certain preliminary training to those who are 
the leaders in church or college work, in society, in 
philanthropy and in association work itself. 

The Devotional Committee plans for mid-week ser- 
vices conducted by the students themselves, and Sun- 



118 The State Norm at, 

day evening vesper services led by resident pastors 
or members of the faculty. 

Other committees arrange for courses in mission 
and Bible study. Any student or teacher in the Col- 
lege or any woman connected with the College may be 
elected an associate member of the Association. Any 
woman who is a member of an evangelical church is 
eligible to active membership. To fail to become an 
active or associate member of such an organization 
is, we feel sure, to make a mistake. 

A copy of the Students' Handbook, a publication 
issued by the Association and containing much valu- 
able information for every student of the College, is 
furnished upon request. 

VOLUNTARY MISSION STUDY CLASSES 

Taught by Members of the Faculty 

Korea Miss Coit 

Decisive Hour in Christian Missions Miss Strong 

Turkey Miss McAllester 

South America Miss Petty 

Africa Miss Summerell 

Home Missions Miss Anderson 

Notable Women of China Miss Miller 

Taught by Students 

Church of the Open Country Bertha Stanbury 

India Florence Hughes 

The Light of the World Annie Scott 

Servants of the King Elizabeth Hall 

Japan Mary Worth 

VOLUNTARY BIBLE CLASSES 

Led by Members of the Faculty 

Reading Circle Miss KirUand 

Old Testament Studies Miss Coit 

Acts of the Apostles Miss MendenhaU 

New Testament Studies Miss Daniel 

Hebrew History Miss Potwine 



and Industrial College 119 

Old Testament Women Miss King 

Sunday School Pedagogy Mr. Merritt 

Gospel of Mark Miss Miller 

Old Testament Women Miss Miller 

Led by Students 

Life of Paul Lillian Hunt 

Gospel of Mark Winifred Turlington 

Christ 's Teaching Concerning Life Marguerite Brooks 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Matter descriptive of the several musical organ- 
izations of the College will be found under the head- 
ing, Music Department. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATION PAY DAYS 

The several student organizations of the College 
have agreed upon a day to be set apart for the pay- 
ment of all fees. For former students, the pay day is 
September 28th; for new students, November 16th. 
The fees are : 

Young Women's Christian Association $1.00 

Adelphian and Cornelian Literary Societies .... 2.50 

Athletic Association 25 

Class Organizations (as agreed upon). 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

BULLETINS 

In an effort to extend its field of usefulness the 
College issues quarterly a Bulletin for free distribu- 
tion among the citizens of North Carolina. These bul- 
letins represent the best thought of its faculty on 
subjects of vital interest to the home and school. 
Available numbers of former issues may be had upon 
application to the President. 



120 The State Normal 

ALUMNAE NEWS 

The Alumnae News, published quarterly, is the 
official organ of the Alumnae Association of the State 
Normal and Industrial College. It is designed to serve 
as a bond of union and a medium of communication 
between the alumnae. Departments containing college 
notes, communications from graduates and former stu- 
dents, and news-matter of interest to all friends of the 
College are included in each issue. 

THE STATE NORMAL MAGAZINE 

The State Normal Magazine is published every 
month from October to June, by a Board of Editors 
elected from the Adelphian and Cornelian Literary 
Societies. The publication is under the general direc- 
tion of an Advisory Editor chosen from the Faculty. 
The matter contained in it is not of purely local inter- 
est. Timely articles on current educational questions, 
with material relating to the past history of the State, 
form a considerable portion of its contents. 

The subscription price is one dollar a year, pay- 
able in advance. 

TEACHERS' REGISTRY 

A registry of the names of students and graduates 
who desire to teach is kept at the College. The 
alumnae who are interested in it are requested to keep 
the authorities informed of changes in their address. 
The President will be pleased to correspond with any 
who desire teachers. 



and Industrial College 121 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Annual meeting for the election of officers in the College 
auditorium during commencement weelc. 

The State Normal and Industrial College Alumnae 
Association was organized in 1893 and incorporated by 
act of the General Assembly of North Carolina March 
8, 1909. 

The objects of the Association as set forth in sec- 
tion 3 of the Act incorporating it are: 

To encourage, foster, and promote education in the 
State of North Carolina; to aid and assist the North 
Carolina State Normal and Industrial College, by 
donations or otherwise; and to aid and assist, by loans 
or donations, or both, worthy young women of the 
State to obtain an education at the said College; and 
for such purpose to receive, hold, invest, manage, and 
disburse any fund or funds which may come into its 
possession. 

Membership in the Association is limited to pres- 
ent or former members of the faculty, to former stu- 
dents, and students who are members of the graduat- 
ing class at the time of the annual meeting. The 
Association's Loan Funds are described on page 100 
of this catalogue. 

The Alumnae News, published quarterly, is the 
official organ of the Association. 

OFFICERS 1913-1914 

President, Mrs. David Stern, Greensboro, N. C. 
Vice-President, Miss Prances Womble, Greensboro, 

N. C. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Laura H. Coit, Greensboro, 

N. C. 



122 The State Normal, 



LIST OF STUDENTS— 1913-1914 



Name Postofiice County 

Abbitt, Frances Oxford Granville 

Abernethy, Ettie Shelby Cleveland 

Adams, Purcelle Eowland Eobeson 

Albright, Annie Piatt Waynesville Haywood 

Albright, Buth Ellen Asheville Buncombe 

Alderman, Bessie L Greensboro Guilford 

Alexander, Martha Louise . . . Charlotte, E. 1 . . Mecklenburg 

Alexander, Martha Keenan . . Derita Mecklenburg 

Allen, Katherine Coleman .... Blanche, E. 2 .... Caswell 

Anderson, Elsie Hendersonville . . . Henderson 

Anderson, Laura Winecof t . . . Durham Durham 

Ardrey, Ethel Fort Mill, S. C. . . Mecklenburg 

Arey, Buth Guy Elmwood Iredell 

Armstrong, Leontine Creswell Washington 

Arrington, Grace Bocky Mount .... Edgecombe 

Ashworth, Gladys Fair View Buncombe 

Atkinson, Caroline Fayetteville Cumberland 

Austin, Coline Munroe Durham Durham 

Avent, Iola Cotton Durham Durham 

Avery, Edith C Morganton Burke 

Avery, Gladys Love Morganton Burke 

Bagwell, Maude Evangeline . . West Baleigh .... Wake 

Bailey, Myrtle Estelle Selma Johnston 

Baker, Berty Lee Lawndale, E. 2 . . . Cleveland 

Baldrige, Helen Mt. Airy Surry 

Baldwin, Annie Wall Eockingham Eichmond 

Baldwin, Lela Florence Eockingham ... Eichmond 

Barber, Audrey Eeidsville Eockingham 

Barber, Lottie G Barber Bowan 

Barker, Elsie Climax Bandolph 

Barnes, Alice Faye Kenly Johnston 

Barnhardt, Helen Marr Harrisburg, Bfd. . Cabarrus 

Barwick, Mary Ethel Kinston Lenoir 

Bass, Mamie Lee Bocky Mount .... Nash 

Baynes, Effie B Hurdle 's Mills . . . Person 

Beam, Annie Shelby Cleveland 

Beaman, Mary Christine .... Stantonsburg .... Greene 

Beavers, Hallie Siler City Chatham 

Bell, Louise F New Bern Craven 

Beckwith, Winifred Bosemary Halifax 

Benton, Pattie Monroe Union 

Biggers, Martha Monroe Union 

Biggerstaff, Georgia J Butherfordton . . . Butherford 



and Industrial College 123 



Name Postoffice County 

Bilbro, Pearle Virginia Greensboro Guilford 

Black, Julia Holt Carthage Moore 

Blakeney, Alice Monroe Union 

Blakeney, Eosa Monroe Union 

Blevins, Savannah Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Blythe, Margaret Brevard, E. F. D. Transylvania 

Blythe, Euth Elizabeth Huntersville Mecklenburg 

Boddie, Sallie Sledge Durham Durham 

Boddie, Tempe Cornelia Durham Durham 

Boney, Ellen Wallace Duplin 

Boone, Aileen Louisburg Franklin 

Boone, Nina Gibsonville Guilford 

Bordeaux, Addie E East Durham .... Durham 

Boseman, Margaret Hunter . . Enfield Halifax 

Bostian, Annie E Salisbury Eowan 

Bouldin, Isabel Carter Greensboro Guilford 

Boyd, Hattie Wills Manson Warren 

Brady, Alma Chrystell Benson Johnston 

Brady, Cornelia Wilmington New Hanover 

Briggs, E. Joy Greensboro Guilford 

Brooks, Ina May Eoxboro Person 

Brooks, Marguerite Greensboro Guilford 

Brown, Emmie Albemarle Stanly 

Brown, Leafy May Statesville Iredell 

Brown, Maggie Eich Square Northampton 

Bryan, Julia Othel Battleboro Edgecombe 

Bullard, Kate V Fayetteville Cumberland 

Bullock, Isabel Eowland Eobeson 

Bunn, Maude Eock Mount Nash 

Burns, Catherine Asheboro Eandolph 

Caldwell, Angalene Charlotte, E. 29 . . Mecklenburg 

Cameron, Bessie Merritt Vass Moore 

Cameron, Charlotte J Polkton Anson 

Campbell, Lois Salisbury Eowan 

Campen, Marguerite Alliance Pamlico 

Canaday, Julia May Benson Johnston 

Capehart, Eliza Mason Eoxobel Bertie 

Carraway, Gertrude S New Bern Craven 

Carson, Ellen Marion McDowell 

Carter, Caroline Westminster, S. C. Oconee 

Carver, Stella Lee Madison 

Caudle, Cora Hamptonville .... Yadkin 

Caudle, Mamie L Hamptonville .... Yadkin 

Cavenaugh, Anna Wilmington .... New Hanover 

Chadwick, Gladys Beaufort Carteret 

Chandler, Anna B Euflin Eockingham 

Cherry, Ernestine A Scotland Neck . . . Halifax 

Clapp, Annie Greensboro Guilford 

Clarke, Leah Evelyn Lowell Gaston 



124 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Clarke, Nola Morganton Burke 

Cline, Mamie Granite Falls .... Caldwell 

Coats, Hattie L Smithfield Johnston 

Cobb, Katherine A Lincolnton Lincoln 

Cohen, Hattie Maie New Bern Craven 

Cole, Nellie Eugenia Durham Durham 

Cole, Vivian McCoy Goldsboro Wayne 

Coleman, Inabelle Lyons Granville 

Coleman, Lucy Wise Warren 

Coltrane, Elizabeth Greensboro Guilford 

Coltrane, Eva P Bandleman Eandolph 

Conner, Sallie Bich Square .... Northampton 

Cook, Mrs. M. F News Ferry, Va. . . 

Cooke, Annie Britton Windsor Bertie 

Cooper, Mary Ashburn Windsor Bertie 

Coppedge, Annie Cordell .... Wadesboro Anson 

Corbett, Ercell Atkinson Pender 

Cornelius, Jessie Lee Mooresville Iredell 

Council, Iris High Point Guilford 

Council, Vesta Mt. Airy Surry 

Covington, Esther Lee Mebane, B. 6 .... Alamance 

Covington, Hattie Mae Wadesboro Anson 

Cox, Hazel B Pisgah Eandolph 

Cox, Jane Grey Moyock Currituck 

Cox, Jeannette Winterville Pitt 

Cox, Olivera Winterville Pitt 

Craddock, Elizabeth Houston, Va Halifax 

Craig, Ethel Eankin Dallas Gaston 

Craven, Bessie Ethel High Point, E. 2. . Guilford 

Crews, Myrtle Oxford Granville 

Crowder, Pauline Wadesboro Anson 

Crumpler, Grace Margaret . . . Clinton Sampson 

Culbertson, Clara Mooresville ... Iredell 

Currie, Jennie Carthage Moore 

Daniel, Annie Eodgers Salisbury Eowan 

Darlington, Fannie Maie .... North Wilkesboro. Wilkes 

Daughety, Eunice Lillian . . . Kinston Lenoir 

Daughety, Lalla Lynn Kinston Lenoir 

Davis, Christine Trotter Henderson Vance 

Davis, Ethel Hauser East Bend Yadkin 

Davis, Julia Holt -....' Wilson's Mills . . . Johnston 

Davis, Lucy C Mount Olive Wayne 

Dawson, Alice L Tarboro Edgecombe 

Dean, Vernon Dean Macon 

Deans, Clyde Wilson Wilson 

Deans, Irma L Coleraine Bertie 

Deans, Mary V Coleraine Bertie 

Decker, Martha Marion McDowell 

Dexter, Elizabeth P Elizabeth City . . . Pasquotank 



and Industrial College 125 



Name Postoffice County 

Dillon, Estelle Tuscarora Craven 

Ditmore, Eoselle Millsaps Graham 

Dodson, Priscilla Harding . . Greensboro Guilford 

Doggett, Anna Willis Brown Summit . . Guilford 

Dorrity, Mary Jane Goldsboro Wayne 

Doughton, Emory Laurel Springs . . Alleghany 

Dowdy, Lizzie Laurinburg . . . . Scotland 

Dowty, Nancy Sidney Grantsboro Pamlico 

Doxey, Elsie Poplar Branch . . Currituck 

Driver, Nellie Gray Cotton Cumberland 

Duckett, Lura M Spring Creek .... Madison 

Duckworth, Marjorie Morganton Burke 

Duncan, Maude Helen Horse Shoe Henderson 

Eaton, Mamie Hunt Garland Sampson 

Edwards, E. Vivian Greenville, S. C. . . Greenville 

Elliott, Emily Patterson Duke, E. 1 Harnett 

Elliott, Carrie L Stony Point Iredell 

Ellis, Lillian Wilson Wilson 

Emerson, Gladys E Salisbury Kowan 

Erwin, Catherine Adelaide . . Brevard Transylvania 

Evans, Elizabeth Lexington Davidson 

Faison, Laura Murphy Faison Duplin 

Faison, Kuth S Faison Duplin 

Fallon, May Louise Durham Durham 

Ferebee, Alice Louise Stonewall Pamlico 

Ferguson, Pearl Spring Creek .... Madison 

Fields, Martha Walstonburg .... Greene 

Fisher, Mary Elizabeth Concord Cabarrus 

Fleming, Myra Hassell Martin 

Fleming, Eebekah Statesville Iredell 

Folger, Annie Laurie Dobson Surry 

Fountain, Sarah Alice Tarboro Edgecombe 

Fountain, Sue Mary Tarboro Edgecombe 

Freshwater, Mary Estelle .... Haw Eiver Alamance 

Fristoe, Sadie Y Baltimore, Md. . . 

Fry, Zora Lee Carthage Moore 

Fuller, Annie Maye Eaef ord Hoke 

Fuller, Lizzie M Lenoir Caldwell 

Fusselle, Nellie Teacheys Duplin 

Futrell, Margaret Idonia .... Woodland Northampton 

Gaither, Euth Pamela Harmony, E. 1 . . Iredell 

Gamble, Lucy V Crumpler Ashe 

Garner, Piccola May Mt. Olive Duplin 

Garner, Mina Newport Carteret 

Garren, Delia Hendersonville . . . Henderson 

Garrett, Ethie Bew Burlington Alamance 

Garrett, Flora Anthea Burlington Alamance 



126 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Garriss, Martha P Wilson, E. F. D. . . Wilson 

Gattis, Annie Chapel Hill Orange 

Gilchrist, Flora Irene Laurinburg Scotland 

Gill, Lena Elizabeth Louisburg, E. 3 . . Franklin 

Gill, Euth Statesville Iredell 

Glasgow, Eula Greensboro Guilford 

Glenn, Annie Torrence Gastonia Gaston 

Glenn, Bertha Edith Durham Durham 

Glenn, Lena Stoneville Eockingham 

Goforth, Caroline Louise .... Lenoir, E. 4 Caldwell 

Golston, Grace Goldston Chatham 

Goodson, Gladys Marion McDowell 

Goodwin, Louise Winston .... Morganton Burke 

Gordon, Mary Monroe Union 

Graeber, Annie Pauline Salisbury Eowan 

Gray, Emily Manly Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Green, Mary Elizabeth Thomasville . . . . Davidson 

Green, Susan Margaret Thomasville . . . . Davidson 

Greenwood, Estelle Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Groome, Jessie Greensboro, E. 3 . . Guilford 

Groves, Pattie Johnston Lumberton Eobeson 

Guion, Mary Ellen New Bern Craven 

Gump, Mrs. Jeanette B Greensboro Guilford 

Gunter, May Eliza Sanf ord Lee 

Gunter, Euth Pauline Sanf ord Lee 

Gwynn, Mary Waters Leaksville Eockingham 

Gwynn, Sarah Minor Leaksville Eockingham 

Haight, Edith C Eocky Mount Nash 

Hall, Alice Belmont Gaston 

Hall, Annie Eoberta Belmont Gaston 

Hall, Elizabeth D Belmont Gaston 

Hall, Margaret Barber Eowan 

Hamilton, Fountain Edith . '. . Greensboro Guilford 

Hampton, Euth Greensboro Guilford 

Hancock, Hilda Scotland Neck . . . Halifax 

Harmon, Hazel Irene High Point Guilford 

Harmon, Mildred E High Point Guilford 

Harper, Margaret Lenoir Caldwell 

Harrell, Helen Kinston Lenoir 

Harris, Flossie Salisbury Eowan 

Harris, Euth Fayetteville Cumberland 

Harrison, Mary Elizabeth . . . Blanche Caswell 

Hart, Alice T Kinston Lenoir 

Hartman, Mary Nell Farmington Davie 

Hartsell, Lena M Oxford Granville 

Hatch, Fannie Sanf ord Lee 

Hatch, Lucy Burlington Alamance 

Hawfield, Amelia Matthews Union 

Hendley, Daisy M Elmwood Iredell 



and Industrial College 127 



Name Postoffice County 

Hendren, Frances Armfield . . Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Hendren, Mabel Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Hendrick, Lottie Mae Shelby Cleveland 

Hendry, Sara C Wallace Pender 

Henley, Claire Greensboro Guilford 

Herring, Gladys M Wilmington New Hanover 

Hicks, Virginia Blanche Wise Warren 

Higdon, Maud Higdonville Macon 

Higgins, Fannie C Leicester Buncombe 

Hill, Tamsy May New Bern Craven 

Hill, Vera E. Beaufort Carteret 

Hockett, Mary Alice Pleasant Garden . Guilford 

Hockett, Laura Asenath .... Pleasant Garden . Guilford 

Hodgin, Julia Blanche Greensboro Guilford 

Hoey, Tinsalora Shelby Cleveland 

Hogan, Pearl Halford Blackwood Orange 

Hollingsworth, Kathryn S. . . . Mt. Airy Surry 

Holloway, Hallie Woods Gorman Durham 

Holloway, Mamie A Gorman Durham 

Holman, Gay Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Holmes, Ellen S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Holt, Iris Leola Burlington Alamance 

Holt, Laura Elizabeth Durham Durham 

Honrine, Frances Inez Wilson 's Mills . . Johnston 

Horn, Esther Mocksville Davie 

Hornthal, Martha Plymouth Washington 

Horton, Elizabeth A Asheville Buncombe 

Horton, Hattie Lee Ayden Pitt 

Hoskins, Mary Katherine .... Summerfield Guilford 

House, Elsie H. Marion McDowell 

Howard, Frankie Eichlands Onslow 

Howell, Lillian Glen Goldsboro, E. 1 . . . Wayne 

Howell, Louise Tarboro Edgecombe 

Howell, Maggie Staton Tarboro Edgecombe 

Hubbard, Alice Y Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Hughes, Florence Pauline .... Greensboro, E. 6 . . Guilford 

Humbert, Annie Eee Polkton Anson 

Hunt, Dorothy Penn Oxford Granville 

Hunt, Helen Eussell Oxford Granville 

Hunt, Lillian Oxford Granville 

Hunter, Barbara Elizabeth . . Charlotte, E. 8 ... Mecklenburg 

Ipock, Janie Charlton Goldsboro Wayne 

Jackson, Gladys Salisbury Eowan 

Jackson, Vinnie Lou Benson Johnston 

Jacobs, Nell South Mills Camden 

Jimeson, Thessa Garden City McDowell 

John, Cora Lumber Bridge . . Eobeson 

John, Margaret McEae Lumber Bridge . . Eobeson 



128 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Johnson, Clara Louise Greensboro Guilford 

Johnson, Julia May Burgaw Pender 

Johnson, Katherine L Greensboro Guilford 

Johnson, Mary Twombly .... Tarboro Edgecombe 

Johnston, Euth Newell Mecklenburg 

Johnston, Sarah Newell Mecklenburg 

Jones, Hallie A Eoxboro Person 

Jones, Helen A Greensboro Guilford 

Jones, Kate Evelyn Fair View Buncombe 

Jones, Louise Leventhorpe . . . Hickory Catawba 

Jones, Mary Louise Durham Durham 

Jones, Mary Louise New Bern Craven 

Jones, Euth Hope Mills, E. 2 . Cumberland 

Joplin, Naomi Greensboro Guilford 

Joplin, Euth Greensboro Guilford 

Jordan, Octavia Durham Durham 

Jordan, Vivian Siler City Chatham 

Justice, Lila Cutler Greensboro Guilford 

Keeter, Eva Marion McDowell 

Keeter, LeNora Grover Cleveland 

Keith, Ha Greensboro Guilford 

Kennette, Audrey Vance .... Mooresville Iredell 

Kennette, Ernestine Chapel Hill Orange 

Kennette, Madge Chapel Hill Orange 

Kephart, Mrs. E. E High Point Guilford 

Kernodle, Lorena Graham Alamance 

Kernodle, Euth Ashmore .... Washington, D. C. 

Kersey, Flossie Mae Greensboro Guilford 

King, Eema M Greensboro Guilford 

Kirkpatrick, Mazie D Clyde, E. 1 Haywood 

Kluttz, Addie Jeannette West Durham . . . Durham 

Kornegay, Swanna Belle .... Kenansville Duplin 

Lambert, Nannie S Asheboro Eandolph 

Landon, Sudie Clinton Sampson 

Langdon, Lillie Benson, E. 1 .... Johnston 

Lapsley, Catherine Eutherf ord Harrisburg, Ef d. . Cabarrus 

Lea, Euby King Blanche, E. 1 .... Caswell 

Leak, Katherine Mary Wadesboro Anson 

Lefler, Sophie Cooleemee Davie 

Legett, Hallie Belk Wadesboro Anson 

Leggett, Lucile Scotland Neck. . . Halifax 

Lentz, Ada L Gold Hill Cabarrus 

LeEoy, Marie Elizabeth City . . . Pasquotank 

Lewis, Hannah J Bladenboro Bladen 

Lineberger, Edith Belmont Gaston 

Lineberger, Marie Shelby Cleveland 

Linker, Margaret Salisbury Eowan 

Lipe, Arey Mooresville Iredell 



and Industrial College 129 



Name Postoffice County 

Lipe, Mattie Mooresville Iredell 

Lippard, Cora Mabel Concord Cabarrus 

Lof tin, Maria Mt. Olive Wayne 

Loftin, Martha E Mt. Olive Wayne 

Long, Elizabeth Webb Fairview Buncombe 

Long, Minnie B Graham Alamance 

Long, Yancey Fairview Buncombe 

Lossen, Emma Wilmington New Hanover 

Lovelace, Edwina Harris .... Wilson Wilson 

Lucas, Annie Currie Pender 

Lucas, Evelyn Taylor Wilson Wilson 

Lucas, Grace Wilson Wilson 

Lupton, Belle Belhaven Beaufort 

Lupton, Bertha Eldridge .... Belhaven Beaufort 

Lupton, Maysel Swan Quarter . . . Hyde 

Lyon, Ava Lee Lyons Granville 

Lyon, Ollie I Lyons Granville 

McAllister, Isabella Eoper Washington 

McArthur, Mattie Hope Mills, B. 2 . Bobeson 

McBrayer, Sadie Lou Asheville Buncombe 

McGraw, Elizabeth Wiggins. . Wilson Wilson 

McCrummen, Malcom Neolia. West End Moore 

McCullers, Josie Macullers Wake 

McDougald, Juanita Whiteville, B. 2 . Bladen 

McGee, Alice Vivian Mt. Olive Wayne 

McGirt, Carrie Maxton Bobeson 

Mcintosh, May Denver Lincoln 

Melver, Ella Jay Carthage Moore 

Mclver, Margaret Carthage Moore 

McKinney, Mattie Beidsville Bockingham 

McLean, Vonnie Democrat Buncombe 

MacMillan, Henrietta Parkton Bobeson 

McNeill. Franches Blanche . . Vass Moore 

MacNeill, Esther Bowland Bobeson 

MePherson, Lula Belle Cameron Moore 

McQueen, May Morven Anson 

Mad dry, Louise Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Mallard, Thelma Teacheys Duplin 

Mann, Hildah J Swan Quarter . . . Hyde 

Marrow, Alice Burwell Henderson Vanee 

Martin, Flora McQueen Aberdeen Moore 

Martin, Lueinda Leaksville Bockingham 

Masemore, Elizabeth V Wadesboro Anson 

Mason, Maude Atlantic Carteret 

Mason, Velma Atlantic Carteret 

Massey, Zilphia Thurston . . . Clayton Johnston 

Matthews, Margaret Clute . . Clinton Sampson 

Meador, May Minerva Beidsville Bockingham 

Mellichampe, Sudie S High Point Guilford 



13® The State Normal 



Name Postoffice Oounty 

Melvin, Lila White Oak Bladen 

Meroney, Margaret D Mocksville Davie 

Milam, Emily B Macon Warren 

Miller, Olivia Isadore Eocky Mount .... Pender 

Millsaps, Vera E Statesville Iredell 

Milton, Julia Ellen Albemarle Stanly 

Mitchell, Belle Wake Forest, E. 3 Wake 

Mitchell, Mamie Berthel .... Asheville Buncombe 

Mitchell, Edith E Bessemer City . . . Gaston 

Mitchell, Esther Oxford Granville 

Mitchell, Fannie Starr Wilmington New Hanover 

Monroe, Alberta C Biscoe Montgomery 

Monroe, Estelle Monroe Union 

Monroe, Ethel Biscoe Montgomery 

Monroe, Sarah Bell Greensboro Guilford 

Moore, Eliza Greenville Pitt 

Moore, Elizabeth Blanche Caswell 

Moore, Eva Lillian Scotland Neck . . . Halifax 

Moore, Genevieve High Point Guilford 

Moore, Josephine Alsey .... Mt. Airy Surry 

Moore, Louise Williams .... Teacheys Duplin 

Moore, Willie Simmons Scotland Neck . . . Halifax 

Morgan, Mary Eleanor Goldsboro Wayne 

Morgan, Mamie A Fairview Buncombe 

Morris, Frances K Mocksville Davie 

Morris, Lillian Fremont Wayne 

Morrison, Kate Wadesboro Anson 

Moses, Elizabeth Chapel Hill Orange 

Musgrove, Jeannette Weldon Halifax 

Myatt, Irene Smithfield Johnston 

Neal, Lenna Sue Danville, Va Caswell 

Newton, Effie Johnson Hope Mills Cumberland 

Norvell, Louise G Blowing Eock . . . Watauga 

Norwood, Marie Elizabeth . . . South Boston, Va. Halifax 

'Brien, Mamie Hamlet Eichmond 

'Daniel, Lenora Mebane, E. 6 . . . . Alamance 

'Daniel, Narva A Mebane, E. 6 . . . . Alamance 

Oliver, Helen J Marietta Eobeson 

Oliver, Eosa Hurdle 's Mill, E. 3 Person 

Owen, Lila Elizabeth Lexington Davidson 

Ozment, Vertie Violet Jamestown Guilford 

Parker, Flossie Hunting Creek . . . Wilkes 

Parkin, Margaret Nell Trinity Eandolph 

Parrish, Eula Gardner Smithfield Johnston 

Parrish, Lillie Asheboro Eandolph 

Paschal, Swanna Siler City Chatham 

Pate, Naomi Goldsboro Wayne 



and Industrial College 131 



Name Postoffice County 

Patterson, Clara May Greensboro Guilford 

Patton, Sadie Morganton Burke 

Paul, Mary Elkin Surry 

Paylor, Isabel Greensboro Guilford 

Paylor, Vivian Greensboro Guilford 

Peirson, Annie Simpson Enfield Halifax 

Penny, Sibyl Ealeigh, E. 1 Wake 

Perry, Lottie Sanf ord Lee 

Petrie, Agnes Asheville Buncombe 

Petrie, Margaret Asheville Buncombe 

Petty, Kathleen Louise High Point Guilford 

Phelps, Dorothy Draper Eockingham 

Phillippie, Ethel L Whitsett Guilford 

Phillips, Lizzie Thomasville, E. 4 . Eandolph 

Pinkston, Bessie May Wadesboro Anson 

Pinkston, N. DeLuke Wadesboro Anson 

Pinner, Daisy Katherine .... Canton Haywood 

Pinner, Ethel Columbia, E. 1 ... Tyrrell 

Pippin, Bonnie Belle Wakefield Wake 

Pippin, Eochelle E Wakefield Wake 

Pollard, Mamie Euth Farmville Pitt 

Pool, Naomi S Kinston Lenoir 

Poole, Alice Greensboro Guilford 

Porter, Ida Elizabeth Concord Cabarrus 

Poteat, Mary Marion McDowell 

Powell, Clara M Warren Plains, El Warren 

Powell, Mary Bobbitt Warren Plains . . . Warren 

Powers, Mary E Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Price, Laura Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Pridgen, Katie Bunn Wilmington New Hanover 

Pruitt, Annie B Franklinton Franklin 

Puett, Artelee Dallas Gaston 

Puett, Juanita P Dallas Gaston 

Eand, J una Garner J onnston 

Eankin, Elma Gastonia Gaston 

Eankin, Susie Gastonia Gaston 

Eawlins, Gladys Shepard .... Oxford Granville 

Eay, Kate W Greensboro Guilford 

Eeeves, Lillian Mt. Airy Surry 

Eeid, Euth Marie Elizabeth City . . . Pasquotank 

Eichard, Marianne J Salisbury Eowan 

Eichardson, Nellie Beaufort Carteret 

Eiggs, Vivian Izona Moriah Person 

Eobbins, Mary Alice Lenoir Caldwell 

Eobbins, Irene Lenoir Caldwell 

Eobertson, Fannie B Eowland Eobeson 

Eobertson, Magnolia Eobersonville .... Martin 

Eobertson, Miriam Ealeigh Wake 

Eobertson, Pattie Woodsdale Person 



132 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Bobertson, Pearl Bobersonville .... Martin 

Bobertson, Bosa Woodsdale Person 

Bobinson, Caroline Hines .... Ivanhoe Sampson 

Bobinson, Minnie Atlantic Carteret 

Boekett, Katherine Bandleman Bandolph 

Bodwell, Virgie I Macon Warren 

Bogers, Elizabeth Still Oxford Granville 

Bogers, Olivia Oxford Granville 

Bose, Ellen Wallace Duplin 

Both, Buth Henderson Vance 

Sawyer, Alice Wilmington Brunswick 

Scarborough, Vivian Kinston Lenoir 

Schiffman, Etta H Greensboro Guilford 

Scott, Annie V Greensboro, B. 6 . . Guilford 

Scott, Imogen McCullers .... Burlington Alamance 

Seagraves, Ethel Pearl Holly Springs . . . Wake 

Settle, Effie Bonda, B. 1 Wilkes 

Sharpe, Mary Glen Greensboro Guilford 

Shaver, Pauline Salisbury Bowan 

Shelton, Merrill James Canton Haywood 

Sherrill, Marguerite Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Shuford, Sarah Perrin Newton Catawba 

Sidbury, Buby Ashton Pender 

Siler Flossie E Siler City Chatham 

Simpson, Ada Haw Biver Alamance 

Sinclair, Eunice Fayetteville Cumberland 

Sinclair, Julia Marion McDowell 

Slaughter, Leah Goldsboro Wayne 

Sloan, Cora Belle Hendersonville . . Henderson 

Smith, Ada M Atlantic Carteret 

Smith, Euline Elizabeth Hamlet Bichmond 

Smith, Gertrude Pilot Mountain . . Surry 

Smith, Helen G Fountain Pitt 

Smith, Lettie W Efland, B. 1 Orange 

Smith, Margaret N Goldsboro Wayne 

Smith, Minnie Atlantic Carteret 

Smithwick, Lucy Louisburg Franklin 

Smoak, Edith May Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Spainhour, Annie E Morganton Burke 

Sparger, Elsie Mt. Airy Surry 

Sparger, Margaret Mt. Airy Surry 

Spiers, Mildred Weldon Halifax 

Spruill, Eulah C Boper Washington 

Spurgeon, Mary Hillsboro Orange 

Stacey, Janie Beidsville Bockingham 

Stacy, Nancy McDowell Shelby Cleveland 

Stacy, Bosa Lelia Nebo McDowell 

Stanbury, Bertha Alice Boone Watauga 

Steedman, Alma Kelsey Horse Shoe Henderson 



and Industrial College 133 



Name Postoffice County 

Stephens, Mary Hazel Greensboro Guilford 

Stephens, Mabel Frances .... Semora Caswell 

Stevens, Annie Goldsboro Wayne 

Stimson, Kebecca Statesville Iredell 

Stout, Flossie Mae High Point Guilford 

Stratford, Willie May Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Streetman, Kate Mae Marion McDowell 

Strupe, Elzora Vest Tobaccoville Forsyth 

Styron, Norma C New Bern Craven 

Summerell, Frances P China Grove Eowan 

Sumner, Laura Edith Lincolnton Lincoln 

Sumner, Fannie Franklinville .... Eandolph 

Sumner, Laura Franklinville .... Eandolph 

Swain, Lynette Grimsley .... Mebane Alamance 

Swanson, Mabel Elizabeth . . . Lenoir Caldwell 

Sweet, Amelia M Cornelius Mecklenburg 

Tarkenton, Leigh Woodard Bertie 

Tate, Maud Lenoir Caldwell 

Tate, Euth Burlington Alamance 

Tatum, Christine Cooleemee Davie 

Taylor, Stella Brown Kinston Lenoir 

Taylor, Euth Boone Watauga 

Teague, Mrs. Ernest W Greensboro, E. 1 . Guilford 

Teal, Sallie B Wadesboro Anson 

Temple, Pearl Sanf ord Lee 

Temple, Thelma Elizabeth . . . Kinston Lenoir 

Templeton, Irene Statesville Iredell 

Tennent, Annie Edward Asheville Buncombe 

Terry, Bessie Eockingham Eichmond 

Thigpen, Hattie E Tarboro, E. 5 . . . . Edgecombe 

Thomas, Ethel Gertrude Lenoir Caldwell 

Thompson, Lucy Greensboro Guilford 

Thompson, Eeita C Eoper Washington 

Thompson, Susan E Davidson Mecklenburg 

Tilley, Myrtle Agnes Mt. Airy i . Surry 

Trogdon, Linda Greensboro Guilford 

Tuck, Natalie Hughes Durham Durham 

Tull, Frances Eugenia Kinston, E. 1 .... Lenoir 

Turlington, Winifred Clinton Sampson 

Turner, Nina Grover Cleveland 

Tuttle, Martha Lenora Eural Hall, E 2. . . Forsyth 

Uzzell, Evelyn Elithe Seven Springs . . . Wayne 

Vail, Ora Pikeville Wayne 

Wagstaff , Nola Eoxboro, E. 3 .... Person 

Wakefield, Lillian Lenoir Caldwell 

Walters, Margaret Belle .... Hertford Perquimans 



134 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Warren, Agnes Viola Dunn Sampson 

Warren, Emma Teresa Dunn Sampson 

Watkins, Anne Sanf ord Lee 

Watson, Eugenia Purlear Wilkes 

Watson, Lillian Hope Wingate Union 

Watson, Ouida Carthage Moore 

Watt, Ila Stony Point Alexander 

Webb, Annie Lee Chapel Hill Orange 

Wells, Ethel Greensboro, E. 4. . Guilford 

West, Christiana Kinston, E. 6 . . . . Lenoir 

West, Eosa Belle Banner Elk Avery 

White, Mary Adelaide High Point, E. 1 . Guilford 

White, Grace Lee Greensboro Guilford 

White, Mildred Mebane, E. 6 . . . . Alamance 

White, Hettie M Elizabeth City . . . Pasquotank 

White, Pauline B Greensboro Guilford 

White, Euth Stovall Granville 

Whitehurst, Addie F Elizabeth City, E.3 Pasquotank 

Whitehurst, Lula Marie Eliabeth City .... Pasquotank 

Whitley, Clara Smithfield Johnston 

Whitley, Louise . Albemarle Stanly 

Whitson, Bessie L Swannanoa Buncombe 

Whittelsey, Louise Opelika, Ala Lee 

Whitty, Evelyn Davidson .... Pollocksville Jones 

Wicker, Frances Willard St. Pauls Eobeson 

Wiggins, Lucie Middleburg Vance 

Wiley, Marguerite Hey Asheville Buncombe 

Wilkins, Lois Magnolia Duplin 

Wilkinson, Estelle Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Willef ord, Eloise Kings Mountain . Cleveland 

Williams, Alice Vaiden Warrenton Warren 

Williams, Lena E Linwood Davidson 

Williams, Nannie N Goshen Wilkes 

Williams, Pauline Jeanette . . Wilmington New Hanover 

Williams, Euth M Wilson Wilson 

Willis, Margaret Gladys Mt. Airy Surry 

Wills, Mrs. E. Crawford Greensboro Guilford 

Willson, Euth Swannanoa . . . Greensboro Guilford 

Wilson, Carey Mooresville Iredell 

Wilson, Emma F Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Wilson, Estelle Nebo McDowell 

Wilson, Mary Lee Archdale Eandolph 

Wilson, Verd Cardova Eichmond 

Winkler, Annie B Wilkesboro . . .. . . Wilkes 

Witty, Cornelia Annie Summerfield, R/l. Eockingham 

Woltz, Lola Vivian Mt. Airy Surry 

Woodard, Thelma Pamlico Pamlico 

Woodruff, Elizabeth Hope . . . Walnut Cove Stokes 

Woodruff, Sadie Juliett Kendallville, Ind. . Noble 

Woodside, Annie May Southport BruDSwick 



and Industrial College 135 



Name Postoffice County 

Wooten, Lois Chadbourn Columbus 

Workman, Lois Amelia Burlington Alamance 

Worth, Mary Wilmington New Hanover 

Worthman, Kate S Franklinton Franklin 

Wright, Bessie Ginn Salisbury Kowan 

Yarbrough, Beatrice Spring Hope .... Nash 

Yelverton, Clee Fremont Wayne 

Yokeley, Lema Winston-Salem . . Davidson 

Yokeley, Alma Mt. Airy Surry 

Younge, Eddie Bridgewater McDowell 



136 The State Normal 



SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS— 1913 



Name Postoffice County 

Abernethy, Sallie Sue Granite Falls .... Caldwell 

Albright, Annie Plott Waynesville Haywood 

Aldridge, Lillian Union Eidge .... Alamance 

Allen, Cyrena Stem Granville 

Allsbrook, Gladys Thigpen . . Greensboro Guilford 

Anderson, Ida Altamahaw Caswell 

Ardrey, Ethel Fort Mill, S. C, E.2 Mecklenburg 

Armstrong, Leontine Creswell Washington 

Austin, Coline M Durham Durham 

Barker, Gypsie E Durham Durham 

Baucom, Swannanoa Ealeigh, E. 2 .... Wake 

Beam, Gladys Cherryville Gaston 

Belue, Mallie Campobello, S. C. . Spartanburg 

Benbow, Annie Bethea Greensboro Guilford 

Biggs, Nannie Williamston . ... Martin 

Black, Hazel L Wilmington New Hanover 

Blair, Delia Lenoir Caldwell 

Blalock, Lena Norwood Stanly 

Bland, Eena Cooper Sampson 

Boddie, Sallie Sledge Durham Durham 

Bosher, Juanita Pomona Guilford 

Bostian, Velma China Grove Eowan 

Bowman, Alice Eohr Woodstock, Va. . . Shenandoah 

Bowman, Minnie Eeidsville Eockingham 

Brent, Jennie B Wadesboro Anson 

Briggs, Oriana M High Point Guilford 

Broaeh, Joie Boxboro, E. 6 ... Person 

Brown, Beula Kemps Mills .... Eandolph 

Bruton, Fannie Mt. Gilead Montgomery 

Bruton, Onnie Carthage Moore 

Bulwinkle, Mabel B Dallas Gaston 

Bunn, Maud Eocky Mount .... Nash 

Burton, Sadie T Boonville Yadkin 

Byers, Kansas Caroleen Eutherf ord 

Byrd, Clara B Greensboro Guilford 

Caffey, Katheryne High Point Guilford 

Carmon, Bessie Clifton New Bern Craven 

Carraway, Gertrude S New Bern Craven 

Carrell, Euby Eeidsville Eockingham 

Carroll, Cleo Denton Davidson 



and Industrial College 137 



Name Postoffice County 

Cashwell, Bertha Statesville Iredell 

Castelloe, Fannie Aulander Bertie 

Cauble, Eva Salisbury, R. 3 . . Rowan 

Caudill, Alverda Valle Crucis Watauga 

Caudle, Rosa Peaehland Anson 

Causey, Isla Greensboro Guilford 

Cherry, Ernestine A Scotland Neck . . . Halifax 

Clapp, Georgie Greensboro Guilford 

Coble, Annie T. . Greensboro, R. 6. . Guilford 

Cole, Susie D Pee Dee Anson 

Colman, Lucy Wise Warren 

Cooper, Mabel Taylorsville Alexander 

Covington, Viola Mebane, R. 4 Alamance 

Coward, Eddie Lee Wadesboro Anson 

Cox, Eva Julia Greensboro Guilford 

Crutehfield, Mabel C Guilford College . . Guilford 

Deadmon, Gurtha H Mocksville Davie 

Dilling, Mary Jackson Springs . . Moore 

Ditmore, Roselle Millsaps Graham 

Dorrity, Mary Jane Goldsboro Wayne 

Dough, F. Madelon Manteo Dare 

Eldridge, Sallye H Greensboro Guilford 

Elliott, Carrie Stony Point Iredell 

Falls, Sophronia Gastonia Gaston 

Farabou, Morada Stem Granville 

Farley, Lillian Roxboro Person 

Forrester, Lizzie Ramseur Randolph 

Franck, Leah J Richlands Onslow 

Frazier, Beulah L Claremount Catawba 

Fulton, Irene Greensboro Guilford 

Gaskins, Willie A Greensboro Guilford 

Gibson, Pricie Ruffin Rockingham 

Glass, Adnie E Reidsville Rockingham 

Gluyas, Bright Charlotte, R. 6 ... Mecklenburg 

Gluyas, Lucy Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Gordon, Florence M Chatham, Va .... Pittsylvania 

Gordon, Ruth Chatham, Va .... Pittsylvania 

Gray, Elizabeth Charlotte, R. 6 ... Mecklenburg 

Greene, Betty Wadeville Montgomery 

Hamilton, Fountain Greenville, S. C. . . . Greenville 

Hannah, Mrs. Alice Greensboro Guilford 

Harding, Lucilla Pleasant Garden . Guilford 

Harper, Lela May Vineland Columbus 

Harris, Jessie Taylor Louisburg Franklin 

Harris, Nancy Leaksville Rockingham 



138 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Hart, Nellie Flat Eock Henderson 

Hawkins, Florence Wilmington New Hanover 

Hawkins, Maye Greensboro Guilford 

Holman, Gay Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Hunt, Almira E Lawndale Cleveland 

Hutchinson, Lois Charlotte, E. 29 . . Mecklenburg 

Jackson, Gladys Salisbury Eowan 

Jackson, Mittie High Point, E. 2 . Guilford 

Jerome, Annie C Aydlett Currituck 

Johnson, Annie E Greensboro Guilford 

Johnson, Clara Greensboro Guilford 

Johnston, Carrie Mooresville Iredell 

Johnston, Delia Mooresville Iredell 

Johnston, Ethel Mooresville Iredell 

Johnston, Cynthia Jane Mooresville Iredell 

Jones, Catherine H Durham Durham 

Joyce, Ada Stoneville Eockingham 

Joyner, Claudine Aulander Bertie 

Kemp, lone Virginia Eeidsville Eockingham 

Kendall, Euth Eockingham Eichmond 

Kennette, Audrey Vance .... Mooresville Iredell 

Kernodle, Lorena Graham Alamance 

Ketchie, Mary Brown Mount Ulla Eowan 

Ketchie, Zulia Mount Ulla Eowan 

Knight, Cora Stokesdale Eockingham 

Knight, Ora Stokesdale Eockingham 

Lackey, Pearl Kings Mountain . . Cleveland 

Ladd, Emma Madison Eockingham 

Lambeth, Tera M Brown Summit . . . Guilford 

Lambeth, Minnie Brown Summit . . . Guilford 

Lambeth, Vallie Brown Summit . . . Guilford 

Landon, Sudie Clinton Sampson 

Langdon, Lillie Grace Benson, E. 1 Johnston 

Lewis, Dittie H Greensboro, E. 6 . . Guilford 

Lide, Vermille Eockingham Eichmond 

Lindau, Alfred Greensboro Guilford 

Linker, Margaret C Salisbury Eowan 

Little, Fanny M Little 's Mills .... Eichmond 

Long, Ethel O Lincolnton Lincoln 

Lossen, Emma Gabriella .... Wilmington New Hanover 

Lucas, Evelyn Taylor Wilson Wilson 

Lupton, Bertha Eldridge .... Belhaven Beaufort 

Lupton, Maysel Swan Quarter . . . Hyde 

McCurry, Annie Mayo Morganton Burke 

McDaniel, Chloe Blanchard . . Woodland Northampton 

McKee, Annie Barnes Lincolnton Lincoln 



and Industrial College 139 



Name Postomce County 

McKinney, Mattie Reidsville Rockingham 

McLean, Mary Cameron Moore 

Mangum, Bessie Stem Granville 

Mann, Hildah J Swan Quarter .... Hyde 

Marbut, Mrs. W. R Morganton Burke 

Martin, Lelia Mocksville Davie 

Matthews, Lillie Greensboro Guilford 

Mendenhall, Mrs. Marjorie. . . Greensboro Guilford 

Miller, Elbie Biscoe Montgomery 

Miller, Ella Mae Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Miller, Hattie Winston-Salem, R4 Forsyth 

Miller, Minnie Albemarle Stanly 

Miller, Nell Blythe Winston-Salem . . Forsyth 

Millner, Annie R Leaksville Rockingham 

Miranda, Dolores C Sagua la Grande . . Cuba 

Moore, Hallie Stem Granville 

Morris, Fleda Kernersville Forsyth 

Mundy, Idamae Denver Catawba 

Newbern, Annie L Olds Currituck 

Oakes, Sallie Lee Salisbury Rowan 

Oliver, Rosa Roxboro, R. 6 .... Person 

Owen, Rose Howard Mocksville Davie 

Page, Norma Virginia Greensboro Guilford 

Parker, Elizabeth Poplar Branch . . . Currituck 

Patton, Allene Elon College Alamance 

Payne, Emily M Belew Creek Rockingham 

Pigg, Nannie E Madison Rockingham 

Pinner, Daisy Canton Haywood 

Pittard, Agnes K Bullock Granville 

Plonk, Laura Kings Mt., R. 4 . . Cleveland 

Powell, Clara Morton Warren Plains . . . Warren 

Powell, Mary Bobbitt Warren Plains . . . Warren 

Pugh, Agnes Salisbury Rowan 



Adeline Walnut Madison 

Ramsey, Margaret Ellinor . . . Salisbury Rowan 

Rankin, Susie Gastonia Gaston 

Rascoe, Lilly Reidsville Rockingham 

Reeves, Lillian Mt. Airy Surry 

Rhodes, Myrtle E New Bern Craven 

Richardson, Nellie Randleman Rowan 

Riggan, Bessie Wilmoth Littleton Halifax 

Ripple, Allie May Lexington Davidson 

Roberson, Lula Hillsboro Orange 

Robertson, Pattie , Woodsdale Person 

Robertson, Rosa Woodsdale Person 

Rockett, Katherine Randleman Randolph 



140 The State Normal 



Name Postoffice County 

Rollins, Meader May Durham Durham 

Ross, Katharine A Morganton Burke 

Scott, Lelia Claudine Spencer Rowan 

Shellem, Kate Ansonville Anson 

Shelton, Merrill James Canton Haywood 

Shields, Cora Kernersville Forsyth 

Shore, Mamie Rural Hall Forsyth 

Sipe, Grace E Cherryville Gaston 

Sipe, Pearl Cherryville Gaston 

Sledge, Annie Mae Whitakers Nash 

Sledge, Crawford Charlotte, R. 12 . . . Mecklenburg 

Smith, Lillian Resaca Duplin 

Smith, Maie Reidsville Rockingham 

Somers, Josephine Greensboro Guilford 

Somers, Minnie Mt. Airy Surry 

Spencer, Winnie Pee Dee Anson 

Stack, Daisy Colfax Guilford 

Stallings, Lalah Forshee Rockingham 

Strupe, Maida Beatrice Tobaccoville Forsyth 

Struthers, Hester C Grists Columbus 

Taylor, W. Grimsley Greensboro Guilford 

Taylor, Pearl Boone Watauga 

Terry, Una Mae Reidsville Rockingham 

Thomasson, Pearle Stem Granville 

Thompson, Mary Grey Snow Camp Alamance 

Thompson, Mary M Louisburg Franklin 

Thornton, Anice Mebane Alamance 

Vail, Ora Pikeville Wayne 

Wagoner, Clea Gibsonville Guilford 

Walker, Mrs. Daisy Page . . . Greensboro Guilford 

Wall, Mary Edgar Randolph 

Walton, Lillian A Woodsdale Person 

Ward, Elsie Greensboro Guilford 

Warren, Agnes Viola Dunn ! Sampson 

Watlington, Blanche Altamahaw Guilford 

Watson, Bessie Kenly Johnson 

Wells, Ella Wilson Wilson 

Wells, Mary Elizabeth Shortoff Macon 

West, Christiana Kinston, R. 6 .... Lenoir 

White, Grace High Point Guilford 

White, Grace Lee Greensboro Guilford 

White, Lalla Norlina Warren 

White, Pauline B Greensboro Guilford 

Whitesides, Lula Gastonia Gaston 

Wicker, Valesta Myrtie Moncure Lee 

Williams, Jane Thomasville Davidson 



and Industrial College 141 



Name Postoffice County 

Williams, Matt Ransom .... Newton Catawba 

Williams, Nannie Goshen Wilkes 

Wilson, John N., Jr Greensboro Guilford 

Wilson, Sarah Newton Catawba 

Winslow, Lanta Asheboro Randolph 

Womble, Frances Greensboro Guilford 

Wood, Nora Millboro Randolph 

Wood, Sarah Millboro Randolph 

Woodard, Thelma Pamlico Pamlico 

Wooten, Mrs. Zulienne Kinston Lenoir 

Wortham, Kate S Franklinton Franklin 

Wright, Frances Shortoff Macon 



142 



The State Normal 



STUDENTS ATTENDING INSTITUTE 

1913 



Name 



Postoffice 



County 



Abernethy, Addie May Charlotte, E. 6 . . . Mecklenburg 

Abernethy, Eebecca Charlotte, R. 6 . . . Mecklenburg 

Ashley, Agnes Powell Fairmont Robeson 



Bailey, Ida C Greensboro 

Bain, Myrtle Greensboro 

Barr, Mary B Lilesville, S. C. . 

Bell, Eddie Greensboro, R. 5 

Boone, Annie Margarettsville . 

Bottoms, Clara L Margarettsville . 

Britt, Ethel Garner 

Brown, Nannie T Tarboro 

Butts, Alice Grizzard Garysburg 



Caff ey, Beatrice Summerfield . 

Carlton, Addie Thomasville . 

Cobb, Katurah D McLeansville 

Coon, Bettie Lincolnton . . 

Crowder, Estelle Apex 

Crowell, Mary L Virgilina, Va. 



Darden, Nancy S Ayden, R. 1 

Davis, Floy Kernersville 

Edwards, Hattie Thomasville 

Eldridge, Ellen Smithfield . 

Etheridge, Eva M Tulls 



Guilford 

Guilford 

Lexington 

Guilford 

Northampton 

Northampton 

Wake 

Edgecombe 

Northampton 

Guilford 

Davidson 

Guilford 

Lincoln 

Wake 

Halifax 

Pitt 
Forsyth 

Davidson 
Johnston 
Currituck 



Floyd, Christine Mary Fairmont Robeson 

Foster, Cora E Mocksville, R. 4. . Davie 

Fox, Maud Randleman Randolph 

Frieze, Winnie Concord Cabarrus 

Fulton, Essie Kernersville Forsyth 

Glass, Frances Settle . Reidsville Rockingham 

Grabs, Grace King Stokes 

Gregson, Mabel H Siler City Chatham 

Tlall, Annie Thomasville Davidson 

Harris, Mamie Greensboro Guilford 

Hawkins, Annie Brown Summit . . Guilford 



and Industrial College 143 



Name Postoffice County 

Hedspeth, Nita May Conway Northampton 

Henderson, Dora Huntsville, E. 20. Mecklenburg 

Holt, Juanita Apex Wake 

James, Olive Bane Bishopville, S. C. . Lee 

Long, Annie Unionville Union 

McCoy, Alice Hnntersville Mecklenburg 

MeCulloch, Mary Wills Greensboro Guilford 

MeCulloch, Sara Greensboro Guilford 

Martin, Florence East Bend Yadkin 

Martin, Irma East Bend Yadkin 

Mendenhall, Mrs. E. P Polkton Anson 

Moore, Susan Mocksville Davie 

Nance, Daisy Stem Granville 

Neal, Cora Greensboro, E. 7 . Guilford 

Nims, Dorothy Mt. Holly Gaston 

Norwood, Bessie Ealeigh, E. 6 .... Wake 

Oldham, J. B Chapel Hill, E. 1 . Orange 

Ousby, Eebe Halifax Halifax 

Outland, M. Helen George Northampton 

Patton, Mrs. J. W Elon College Alamance 

Peele, Elma I George Northampton 

Penny, Mrs. E. O Neuse Wake 

Pilson, Elizabeth North Wilkesboro . Wilkes 

Pratt, Annabel Efland Orange 

Pugh, Lillie M Climax Eandolph 

Eadcliffe, Mrs. H. S Lexington Davidson 

Eansom, Minnie Huntersville Mecklenburg 

Eay, Mrs. B. W Leaksville Eockingham 

Eoyall, Evelyn East Durham .... Durham 

Scarborough, Laura Mt. Gilead Montgomery 

Self, Letha Lincolnton Lincoln 

Shuping, Mary , Morganton Burke 

Smith, Willie Lee Oxford Granville 

Spaugh, Kate Mt. Airy Surry 

Spaugh, Mrs. Sarah Mt. Airy Surry 

Spurgeon, Pattie Glenn Hillsboro Orange 

Stewart, Alma Mocksville Davie 

Stone, Mary E Columbia, S. C. . . . Eichland 

Stout, Carrie Johnson High Point Guilford 



144 The State Normal 

Sweaney, Iola Leaksville Eockingham 

Vinson, Lossie Wilson 's Mills . . . Johnston 

Waff, Buth Palmer Conway Northampton 

Whitaker, Lulie W Enfield Halifax 

White, Mrs. W. P Eamseur Eandolph 

Willef ord, Irma Kings Mountain . . Cleveland 

Williams, Buth Taylor Wallace Duplin 

Williams, Susie Beidsville Eockingham 

Wills, Annie Louise Brinkleyville .... Halifax 

Woodburn, Mary Chester, S. C Chester 



and Industrial College 



146 



NUMBER RECEIVING INSTRUCTION FROM THE 
INSTITUTION 

Attending the Full Session 633 

Attending the Summer Session 318 

Enrolled in the Training School 328 

Total enrollment 1279 

Names counted twice 46 

Total number taught 1233 



SUMMARY 



BY COUNTIES OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Alamance 23 

Alexander .... 2 
Alleghany .... 1 

Anson 20 

Ashe 1 

Avery 1 

Beaufort 3 

Bertie 8 

Bladen 3 

Brunswick .... 2 
Buncombe .... 16 

Burke 11 

Cabarrus 7 

Caldwell 12 

Camden 1 

Carteret 9 

Caswell 7 

Catawba 6 

Chatham 6 

Cleveland .... 14 

Columbus 3 

Craven 11 

Cumberland ... 8 

Currituck 6 

Dare 1 

Davidson 13 

Davie 11 

Duplin 12 

Durham 22 

Edgecombe ... 9 
Forsyth 16 



Franklin 8 

Gaston 20 

Graham 2 

Granville 22 

Greene 2 

♦Guilford 112 

Halifax 18 

Harnett 1 

Haywood 7 

Henderson .... 6 

Hoke 1 

Hyde 4 

Iredell 23 

Johnston 18 

Jones 1 

Lee 9 

Lenoir 13 

Lincoln 7 

McDowell 12 

Macon 4 

Madison 4 

Martin 4 

Mecklenburg . . 24 

Montgomery . . 6 

Moore 14 

Nash 6 

New Hanover . 11 

Northampton . 11 

Onslow ....... 2 

Orange 12 



Pamlico 5 

Pasquotank ... 6 

Pender 6 

Perquimans ... 1 

Person 14 

Pitt 7 

Randolph 22 

Richmond .... 9 

Robeson 14 

Rockingham . . 33 

Rowan 24 

Rutherford ... 2 

Sampson 11 

Scotland 2 

Stanly 5 

Stokes 2 

Surry 18 

Transylvania ... 2 

Tyrell 1 

Union 9 

Vance 4 

Wake 14 

Warren 12 

Washington ... 6 

Watauga 5 

Wayne 20 

Wilkes 16 

Wilson 10 

Yadkin 6 

Non-residents . 15 



*The enrollment from Guilford includes the students attending the 
Summer Session and Institute. 



146 The State Normal 



SCOPE OF PATRONAGE 

The following interesting and suggestive table of statistics, 

obtained from the 633 students in attendance upon the full 
session, shows the character of the patronage of the Institu- 
tion: 

Counties represented 90 

Average age of students 20 

Number who have taught 71 

Number defraying their own expenses 172 

Number whose fathers are not living 115 

Number whose fathers are farmers 181 

Number whose fathers are merchants 75 

Number whose fathers are clergymen 15 

Number whose fathers are physicians 16 

Number whose fathers are lawyers 13 

Number whose fathers are government officials 20 

Number whose fathers have other occupations 197 

Number educated partly or entirely in public schools 619 

Number who, according to their own statement, would not 

have attended any other North Carolina college 300 



and Industrial College 147 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES— 1913 



Saturday, May 24th 
6:30 P. M.— May Day Bevels 

8:00 P. M. — Annual Meetings of Adelphian and Cornelian 
Literary Societies 



Sunday, May 25th 

11:00 A. M. — Sermon to Graduating Class 

Bev. Walter L. Lingle, D. P., 
Union Theological Seminary, Bichmond, Va. 

8:30 P. M.— Address to T. W. C. A. 

Bev. Plato Durham, D. D., Winston- Salem, N. C. 



Monday, May 26th 

10:30 A. M. — Annual Business Meeting of Alumnae 

11:00 A. M. — Annual Business Meeting of Alumnae Association 
Address by Miss Daisy B. Waitt 

1:00 P. M. — Alumnae Luncheon 

6:00 P. M. — Class Day Exercises 

8:30 P. M. — Annual Concert of the Music Department 



Tuesday, May 27th — Commencement Day 

10:30 A. M. — Annual Address Dr. S. C. Mitchell 

University of South Carolina 

Presentation of Constitutions 

Hon. George W. Connor 

Presentation of Bibles . . . .Bev. J. Clyde Turner 

Awarding Diplomas to Graduates 



148 The State Normal 



DEGREES CONFERRED MAY, 1913 



Eula Beatrice Alexander, B. S Alexander County 

Maude Huntley Beatty, B. P Edgecombe County 

Ethel Condo Bollinger, B. P Buncombe County 

Lura Savannah Brogden, B.P Wayne County 

Lucile Cavenaugh, B. P New Hanover County 

Mary Elizabeth Craig, B. P Kockingham County 

Louise Wood Crawford, B. P Wayne County 

Lillian Gorham Crisp, B. M Pitt County 

Euth Deans, B. P Wilson County 

Martha Hicks Faison, B.P Duplin County 

Gertrude Griffin, B.P Wayne County 

Ione Holt Grogan, A. B Rockingham County 

Huldah Groome, B. P Guilford County 

Jane Ruth Groome, A. B Guilford County 

Meriel Everett Groves, B.P Craven County 

Sallie Lorena Gudger, B. P Buncombe County 

Mildred Harrington, B.P Moore County 

Florence Leona Hildebrand, A. B Burke County 

Myrtle Horney, B. P Guilford County 

Verta Louise Idol, B. M Guilford County 

Florence Jeffress, B. S Haywood County 

Nell B. Johnston, B. P Buncombe County 

Mary Eva Jordan, B. P Henderson County 

Marianna Poisson Justice, A. B Guilford County 

Ethel Keeter, B.P Cleveland County 

Rachel Susan Lynch, B. P Orange County 

Margaret Watson Mann, B. S Hyde County 

Corinna LeMay Mial, B. P Wake County 

Florence Eva Mitchell, A. B Gaston County 

Hattie Yetta Motzno, A. B Wayne County 

Ivey Henrietta Paylor, B.P Guilford County 

Isabel Peirson, B. P Halifax County 

Alice Walker Phelps, B. M Washington County 

Mary Gilmer Porter, B.P Cabarrus County 

Mildred Rankin, B.P Gaston County 

Sadie Lillian Rice, B.P Craven County 

Kathrine McDiarmid Robinson, A. B. . . Cumberland County 

Lizzie Jeffrey Roddick, B.P Forsyth County 

Christine Blair Rutledge, B. P Gaston County 

Pattie Glenn Spurgeon, B. M Orange County 



and Industrial College 149 



Grace Caroline Stanford, B. P Orange County 

Sallie McKenzie Sumner, B. P Lincoln County 

Gretchen Arnold Taylor, B. M Guilford County 

Mary Alice Tennent, B. P Buncombe County 

Carrie McInnis Toomer, B. S New Hanover County 

Annie Penelope "Whitty, B. M Jones County 

Anna Littlepage Williams, B. M Guilford County 



DEGREES CONFERRED JULY, 1913 

Hazel Lucile Black, B.P New Hanover County 

Clara Booth Byrd, A. B Guilford County 

Minnie Gaston Somers, B. P Surry County 



150 The State Normal 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



CLASS OF II 



Mattie Lou Bolton Mrs. J. C. Matthews. . . . Spring Hope, N. C. 

Maude F. Broadway .... Mrs. E. McK. Goodwin. . Morganton, N. C. 

Margaret Burke (Deceased) Mocksville, N. C. 

Mary R. Hampton Mrs. W. A. Eliason .... Statesville, N. C. 

Bertha M. Lee Mocksville, N. C. 

Zella McCulloeh Mrs. T. J. Cheek Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Margaret B. Mclver .... Mrs. R. Bowen Robersonville, N. C. 

Carrie Mullins Mrs. W. H. Hunter Greensboro, N. C. 

Annie M. Page Henderson, N. C. 

Lizzie Lee Williams .... Mrs. Geo. B. Smith .... Capron, Va. 

CLASS OF 1894 

Mary K. Applewhite .... Mrs. J. Y. Killian Newton, N. C. 

Rachel Brown Mrs. R. P. Clarke 1509 R. I. Ave., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

Gertrude Bagby Mrs. W. M. Creasy Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary Lewis Harris Concord, N. C. 

Susan E. Israel Mrs. Harry F. Welfe . . . R. 5, Moorestown, N. J. 

Annie Lee Rose Mrs. V. O. Parker R. 1, Woodland, N. C. 

Virginia Taylor Mrs. H. TJ. Griffith Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary C. Wiley Winston, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1895 

Nettie M. Allen R. 4, Henderson, N. C. 

Mary J. Arrington Louisburg, N. C. 

Elizabeth Battle Greensboro, N. C. 

Mary Allie Bell Mrs. E. W. Blythe Brevard, N. C. 

Lucy A. Boone Mrs. B. E. Copeland . . . Suffolk, Va. 

Mary Bradley Mrs. F. Wilson (dec'd) . Gastonia, N. C. 

Martha Carter 331 Ninth St., 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Alethea Collins , Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Lucy Dees Mrs. J. T. Davenport . . Morehead City, N. C. 

Ida Fields Mrs. L. T. Rightsell (Dec'd) 

LaGrange, N. C. 
Margaret Gash „ 53 Washington Square, 

New York City 

Sarah M. Grant Jackson, N. C. 

Maude Harrison Mrs. P. D. Gray Cary, N. C. 

Lina V. James Mrs. R. H. Welch R. 3, Hertford, N. C. 

Maria D. Loftin Kenansville, N. C. 

Barnette Miller Constantinople College, 

Turkey 



and Industrial College 151 



Jessie Wills Page Mrs. L. K. Gooch Henderson, N. C. 

Annie E. Parker Mrs. W. D. Cook Cuthbert, Ga. 



Ethel M. Parmele Mrs. Guy Cardwell 705 S. Court St., 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Margaret G. Perry So. Pres. College, 

Bed Springs, N. C. 

Nannie E. Eichardson Selma, N. C. 

Annie E. Smallwood .... Mrs. John E. Baughani (Dec'd) 

Eieh Square, N. C. 

Henrietta E. Spier State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Euth Sutton Bronson Place, 

Toledo, Ohio 

Laura Switzer .• . Tampa City, Fla. 

Mariaddie Turner Shelby, N. C. 

Daisy Bailey Waitt Teachers ' Train. School, 

Greenville, N. C. 

Annie M. Williams (Deceased) Eeidsville, N. C. 

Mabel Wooten Mrs. N. C. Newbold (Dec'd) 

Eoxboro, N. C. 
Iola L. Yates Mrs. G. E. Parker Ealeigh, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1896 

Emily Manetta Asbury . . Mrs. J. A. Yoder Vale, N. C. 

Maud Coble Mrs. C. M. Mcintosh . . . Laurinburg, N. C. 

Laura H. Coit State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Sallie J. Davis Greenville, N. C. 

Iva Deans Mrs. L. M. Cox (Dec 7 d) 

Cornelia Deaton Mrs. C. H. Hamilton . . E. 24, Davidson, N. C. 

Jeannie Ellington Mrs. E. W. Allen Sanford, N. C. 

Hattie Garvin Mrs. J. H. Tate High Point, N. C. 

Blanche Harper Mrs. W. T. Moseley .... Kinston, N. C. 

Emma B. Harris Mrs. E. M. Davis Tarboro, N. C. 

Tina Lindley Mrs. Coy C. Jordan .... Ealeigh, N. C. 

Mary E. Lazenby 1606 K. St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

Stella Middleton Mrs. George N. Cowan. . Greenwood, S. C. 

Mary Milam Mrs. Edward Farquhar. (Dec'd) 

Washington, D. C. 

Kate Moore (Deceased) Statesville, N. O. 

Annie M. Pittman Mrs. W. K. Hartsell . . . Greensboro, N. 0. 

Lee Eeid Mrs. J. H. Maxwell .... Lewisburg, W. "Va. 

Mary Sanders Mrs. Frank Williams, (Dec'd) 

Elsie Weatherly Mrs. T. Gilbert Pearson. 2257 Loving Place, Bronx 

New York City 
Carrie Weaver Munf ordville, Ky. 

CLASS OF 1897 

Minnie Barbee Mrs. Spence Suitt Gorman, N. C. 

Hattie Berry Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Nellie Bond Mrs. E. S. Askew Avoca, N. C. 



152 The State Normal 



Irma Carraway Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary DeVane Goldsboro, N. C. 

Bertha Donnelly Charlotte, N. C. 

Frances Eskridge Mrs. W. J. Roberts .... Shelby, N. C. 

Iola Exum Snow Hill, N. C. 

Lessie Gill Mrs. I. J. Young Henderson, N. C. 

Emily Gregory Mrs. Walter Thompson . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Annie Hankins Mrs. M. G. Saunders . . Wilmington, N. C. 

Fannie Harris Mrs. Chas. H. Brown . . . Knoxville, Tenn. 

Frances Hill Concord, N. C. 

Lyda Humber Mrs. Marion H. Brandt . Florence, S. C. 

Sabrella James Mrs. J. R. Clements .... Pelham, Ga. 

Mary Best Jones Mrs. I. H. Manning .... Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Madge Little Mrs. J. C. Sherrill Hendersonville, N. C 

Mattie Livermon '. . . Roxobel, N. C. 

Bessie Rouse Raleigh, N. C. 

Grace Scott Mrs. Hugh Brown Little Rock, Ark. 

Argenta Station 

Grace Smallbones Mrs. J. Hicks Bunting . Wilmington, N. C. 

Willie Watson Mrs. E. T. Dickinson . . . Wilson, N. C. 

Cheves West Mrs. H. Scott Perky . . . Brooklyn, Conn. 

CLASS OF 1898 

Lottie Arey Mrs. W. T. Walker Barium Springs, N. C. 

Oeland Barnett Mrs. J. S. Wray Gastonia, N. C. 

Susan Battle (Deceased) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Lillie A. Boney Mrs. R. M. Williams . . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Julia Dameron State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Anna W. Folsom Mrs. H. B. Fisher 815 Fifth St., 

Hoquian, Washington 

Sadie Hanes Mrs. R. D. W. Connor. . . Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Elizabeth Harding Greenville, N. C. 

Rosa Holt Mrs. C. R. Ross Leasburg, N. C. 

Minnie Huffman Mrs. W. H. Reddish . . . Wadesboro, 3ST. C. 

Sara Kelly Charlotte, N. C. 

Margaret McCaull Mrs. W. D. Carmichael Durham, N. C. 

Susie McDonald Mrs. J. C. Fox 2715 Tenth Avenue, 

Columbus, Ga. 

Mamie McGehee Mrs. M. C. McAnally . . High Point, N. C. 

Ella Moseley Mrs. R. F. Hill Kinston, N. C. 

Hattie Moseley Mrs. J B. Person Selma, N. C. 

Florence Pannill Greensboro, N. C. 

Susan Parsley Mrs. J. O. Carr Wilmington, N. C. 

Winnie Redf ern Mrs. J. A. Baldwin .... Charlotte, N. C. 

Ellen Saunders Mrs. G. S. Fraps College Station, Texas 

Bessie Sims Mrs. Hyman Mewborne . Kinston, N. C. 

Nan Strudwick Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mary Tinnin Hillsboro, N. C. 

Lina Wiggins Lynchburg, Va. 

Clee Winstead Wilson, N. C. 

Lydia Yates Mrs. J. C. Wooten Raleigh, N. C. 



and Industrial College 158 



CLASS OF 1899 

Bulus Bagby Mrs. W. H. Swift Greensboro, N. C. 

Ella Bradley Gastonia, N. C. 

Isabelle Brown Salisbury, N. C. 

Lucy Coffin Mrs. W. G. Eagsdale . . Jamestown, N. C. 

Mary Collins Enfield, N. C. 

Cora Cox Mrs. Crawford Jackson . Guilford College, N". C. 

Kate Davis Columbus, Ga. 

Penelope Davis Kaleigh, N. C. 

Lewis Dull Winston, N. C. 

Jennie Eagle 313 Fairfax Ave., 

Norfolk, Va. 

Lottie Eagle Salisbury, N. C. 

Ethel Foust Mrs. Lanier Griffin Greensboro, N. C. 

Olive Gray Statesville, N. C. 

Eugenia Jamison E. 1, Mooresville, N. C. 

Josephine Laxton Asheville, N. C. 

Elizabeth Mallison Washington, N. C. 

Fannie McClees Durham, N. C. 

Berta Melvin Latta, S. C. 

Sudie Middleton Mrs. A. P. Thorpe . . . , Eocky Mount, N. C. 

Maude Miller Winston, N. C. 

Bessie Moody Asheville, N. C. 

Mattie Moore Mrs. Forrest Taylor . . . Sumter, S. C. 

Cary Ogburn Mrs. W. C. Jones High Point, N. C. 

Emma Parker Mrs. C. E. Maddry Raleigh, N. C. 

S. Anna Parker Mrs. D. T. Lunceford. . . Smithfield, N. C. 

Flora Patterson Mrs. W. C. Lane N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Margaret Peirce Warsaw, N. C. 

Sue Porter Mrs. Cornelius Heatwole Harrisonburg, Va. 

Oberia Rogers Mrs. C. W. Padgitt .... 331 Ross Ave, 

Dallas, Texas 

Susie Saunders (Deceased) Washington, N. C. 

Rosalind Sheppard Mrs. H. M. Willis Winston, N. C. 

Elizabeth Smithwick Mrs. R. L. Smith Merry Hill, K C. 

Frances Suttle Asheville, N. C. 

Virginia Thorpe Mrs. R. H. Gregory (Dec'd) Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Jessie Whitaker Mrs. D. A. Ricks Mayodan, N. C. 

Nellie Whitfield Mrs. Daniel Shaw Laurinburg, N. C. 

Marina Whitley Williamston, N. C. 

Myrther Wilson Reynolds, Ga. 

Bettie Wright Mrs. H. B. Smith Tarboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1900 

Emma Adeline Bernard. . Mrs. E. H. Kaminer . . . Gadsden, S. C. 

Woodfin A. Chambers . . . Mrs. Hubert Hill Morgantown, W. Va. 

Wilhelmina Conrad (Deceased) Durham, N. C. 

Isla C. Cutchin Mrs. J. S. Gorham Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Alice G. Daniel R. 4, Oxford, N. C. 

Hattie Everett Plymouth, N. C. 



154 The State Normal 



Clara Gillon Concord, N. C. 

Elizabeth Hankins Mrs. E. E. Clark Wilmington, N. C. 

Buth M. Harper Mrs. W. B. Brown Kinston, N. C. 

Elizabeth Howard Greensboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Howell Mrs. Maurice Clifton . . . Louisburg, N. C. 

Myrtle L. Hunt Mrs. J. E. Mattocks . . . Kissimmee, Fla. 

Gertrude Jenkins Mrs. Kalph Siewers .... Winston-Salem, N. ( 

Lillie V. Keathley Washington, D. C. 

Maude Kinsey New Bern, N. C. 

Mittie P. Lewis Mrs. Wade Barrier Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Auvila Lindsay Mrs. John T. Lowe Lexington, N. C. 

Lily May McDowell Franklin, N. C. 

Miriam C. MacFadyen Greenville, N. C. 

Carrie P. Martin Mrs. W. B. Upshur .... Sumter, S. C. 

Eva M. Miller Taylorsville, N. C. 

Sue Nash State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Myrtie Scarboro Mrs. W. A. Coffin Asheboro, N. C. 

Emma Lewis Speight . . . Mrs. Claud Morris Salisbury, N. C. 

Annie Lee Staley Mrs. Thomas I. Fox . . . Franklinville, N. C. 

Augusta E. Staley Mrs. C. P. Fox Staley, N. C. 

Mary Zilla Stevens Mrs. John E. Stevens . . Richmond, Va. 

Lelia Judson Tuttle McTyeire School, 

Shanghai, China 

Eleanor Watson Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Skinner Winborne. Mrs. Benj. S. Skinner . . Durham, N. C. 
Martha Fowle Wiswall Washington, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1901 

Bosa Abbott Greensboro, N. C. 

Daisy Allen Raleigh, N. C. 

Anna Ferguson Mrs. Leak Peace Oxford, N. C. 

Mabel Haynes Templo Bautista, 

Havana, Cuba 

Bertha Herman '.'... Conover, N. C. 

Mamie Hines Mrs. Walter de La Roque Kinston, N. C. 

Eunice Kirkpatrick Mrs. Joseph Rankin .... Birmingham, Ala 

Birdie McKinney Reidsville, N. C. 

Rosa Rowe Mrs. W. R. Weaver .... Newton, N. C. 

Laura Sanford Mrs. R. T. Faucette .... Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Bertha Sugg Mrs. O. L. McCullen . . . Faison, N. C. 

Ida Wharton Mrs. J. D. Grimes Washington, N. C. 

Frances Winston Franklinton, N. C. 

Frances Womble State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Zoeller Tarboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1902 

Sara Allen Sanford, N. C. 

Cora Asbury Mrs. W. F. Ingram .... Mt. Gilead, N. C. 

Eliza Austin Mrs. W. J. Shearin .... Whitakers, N. C. 

Annie Beaman Goldsboro, N. C. 

Susie Bowling Mrs. C. T. Pearson (Dec'd) Durham, N. C. 



and Industrial College 155 



Virginia Brown Mrs. R. D. Douglas .... Greensboro, N. C. 

Daphne Carraway Wilson, N. C. 

Frances Cole Mrs. F. H. Nicholson . . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Ida Cowan Durham, N. C. 

lone Dunn State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Minnie Field Greensboro, N. C. 

Fannie Freeman Mrs. E. H. Fulghum . . . Wilson, N. C. 

Antoinette Gregory Greensboro, N. C. 

Annie Harrison Mrs. C. G. Winstead .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Sadie Kluttz Salisbury, N. C. 

Jennie Leggett Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Ella Mallison Washington, N. C. 

Florence Mayerberg Goldsboro, N. C. 

Annette Mortan Mrs. J. N. Eice Clatskaine, Oregon 

Fannie Moseley Mrs. E. G. Barrett Kinston, N. C. 

Mary Scott Munroe Goldsboro, N. C. 

Virginia Newby Mrs. W. C. Crowell .... Monroe, N. C. 

Lula Noell Durham, N. C. 

Catherine Pace Mrs. John G. Cox Kinston, N. C. 

Julia Pasmore Cary, N. C. 

Alma Pittman 26 Eange Eoad, 

Shanghai, China 

Carrie Sparger Mrs. C. L. Coon Wilson, N. C. 

Elizabeth Stamps Mrs. B. Moore Parker (Dec'd) Baleigh, N. C. 

Annie Stewart Mrs. W. E. Marsh E. 3, Monroe, N. C. 

Cora Stockton Asheville, N. C. 

Bettie Tripp Durham, N. C. 

Sallie Tucker Mrs. Walter Harding . . Grif ton, N. C. 

Neita Watson Mrs. Ben G. Allen Henderson, N. C. 

Jessie I. Williams Eeidsville, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1903 

Berta Albright Mrs. F. W. Moore Burlington, N. C. 

Olive Allen (Deceased) Henderson, N. C. 

Mary H. Bridgers Tarboro, N. C. 

Gertrude Bryan Mrs. E. Manly Toon .... Whiteville, N. C. 

Flossie Byrd Greensboro, N. C. 

Ida W. Edwards Ayden, N. C. 

Lyda Faison Mrs. E. W. Barnes Kings Mountain, N. C. 

Lucille Foust 319 Home Ave., 

Clarksville, Tenn. 

Ellen Lynch Garrett .... Mrs. J. M. Daniel Greenville, N. C. 

Eula Glenn Gastonia, N. C. 

Lelia Hampton Greensboro, N. C. 

Ida Hankins Seoul, Korea, 

Care Methodist Mission 

Sudie Harding Mrs. Hannis T. Latham . Washington, N. C. 

Bessie Harris Mrs. S. B. Denny Wilson, N. C. 

Frances Hodges 4003 Chestnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Genevieve Jennings Mrs. John Hammer .... Asheboro, N. C. 



156 The State Normal 



Florrie King Mrs. N. E. Morgan .... Atlanta, Ga. 

Annie Kizer Mrs. Tom Bost Raleigh, N. C. 

Bettie Aiken Land Greensboro, N. C. 

Sallie L. Lewis Mrs. Herbert Early . . . Aulander, N. C. 

Lillian Massey R. 3, Durham, N. C. 

Mary T. Moore State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Florida Morris Hendersonville, N. C 

Nettie L. Parker State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Ida Satterthwaite Mrs. Clarence Dunbar . . . High Point, N. C. 

Ida Smith Mrs. D. P. Waters Iron Station, N. C. 

Christina Snyder New Trier Twns 'p H. S. Kenilworth, 111. 

Wil Warder Steele Mrs. Thomas H. Tate (Dec'd) 

Mary Ward 403 Jackson St., 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Pearl Wyche Greensboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1904 

Millie Archer Mrs. T. D. Ravenel Green Pond, S. C. 

Kate Barden Mrs. S. G. Winstead . . . Roxboro, N. C. 

Maggie Burkett Mrs. S. C. Brawley .... Durham, N. C. 

Marie Buys Mrs. J. G. Hardison . . New Bern, N. C. 

Tempe Dameron Warrenton, N. C. 

Lettie Glass Greensboro, N. C. 

Mabel Graeber Concord, N. C. 

Julia Hamlin Mrs. W. T. Robinson . . . Clinton, Ky. 

Berlie A. Harris Mrs. T. H. Williamson . . Winston, N. C. 

Eugenia Harris Mrs. Earl P. Holt Oak Ridge, N. C. 

Annie Belle Hoyle Mrs. J. E. Ayscue Mexico, Mo. 

Maude Hoyle Charlotte, N. C. 

Charlotte Ireland Mrs. Wm. I. Thompson . . Faison, N. C. 

Mary Jones Tifton, Ga. 

Anna Killian Mrs. A. J. Barwick .... Newton, N. C. 

Florence Ledbetter Greensboro, N. C. 

Anna Merritt Mrs. Wm. A. Bradsher . Roxboro, N. C. 

Catherine Nash Mrs. C. R. Mclver Spray, N. C. 

Swanna Pickett Mrs. W. H. Henderson . Chester, S. C. 

Elizabeth Rawls Mrs. W. J. Strickler . . . Burkeville, Va. 

Evelyn Royall Durham, N. C. 

Eugenia Satterwhite .... Mrs. L. O. Reavis Manson, N. C. 

Nathalie Smith Mrs. Thomas Robertson. (Dec'd) 

Scotland Neck, N. C. 

May Stewart Mrs. S. Glenn Brown . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Mattie Taylor Mrs. J. E. Gill R. 4, Henderson, N. 

Rosa Wells Wilson, N. C. 

Mattie D. Williams .... Mrs. Lewis Scoggin .... Louisburg, N. C. 
Susie E. Williams Reidsville, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1905 

Rosa W. Baily Liberty, N. C. 

Nettie Beverly Mrs. Durham D. Belvin . R. 2, Durham, N. C. 



and Industrial College 157 



lone Cates Mercur, Utah 

Mary Coffey Lenoir, N. C. 

Bessie Crowell Charlotte, N. C. 

Josie Dameron Warrenton, N. C. 

Bessie Daniel R. 5, Roxboro, N. C. 

Mary Davis Mrs. J. W. Sewell Monroe, N. C. 

Sadie Davis Mrs. Eugene E. Gray, Jr. Winston, N*. C. 

Louise Dixon Mrs. C. L. Crane Luebo, Congo Beige, 

Africa, via Antwerp 

Emma Duffy Mrs. J. V. Blades New Bern, N. C. 

Kate Finley Statesville, N. C. 

Ruth Fitzgerald Greensboro, N. C. 

Inez Flow Monroe, N. C. 

Jennie Hackett Mrs. Hugh Cranor N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Ethel L. Harris State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

May Hendrix Greensboro, N. C. 

Mary Weldon Huske .... Mrs. R. H. Lewis, Jr. . . Oxford, N. C. 

Mary Jarman Richlands, N. C. 

Mary Kennedy Houstonville, N. C. 

Mary Wills McCulloch Greensboro, N. C. 

Annie Martin Mclver . . Mrs. James R. Young . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Josephine Morton Townsville, N. C. 

Frances Nicholson Statesville, N. C. 

Claude Poindexter Winston, N. C. 

Elizabeth Powell 224 Lester Ave., 

Oakland, Cal. 

Josephine Rainey Mrs. Osmond Smith . . . . R. 1, Milton, N. C. 

Annie D. Rabe Salisbury, N. C. 

Edna Reinhardt R. 1, Stanley, N. C. 

Emma Sharpe Mrs. W. Moulton Avery . Greensboro, N. C. 

Annie Lee Shuford Mrs. D. R. Wall Lilesville, N. C. 

Lettie Spainhour Care S. Baptist Mission, 

Soochow, China 

Clara Spicer Goldsboro, N. C. 

Lizzie B. Stokes Mrs. W. Guy Newby . . . Hertford, N. C. 

Lelia Styron New Bern, N. C. 

Grace Tomlinson Mrs. W. F. Eagles Wilson, N. C. 

Rebecca Warlick Mrs. W. H. Everhart (Dec'd) Newton, N. C. 

Mary R. Williams Tarboro, N. C. 

Mattie Yokley Mt. Airy, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1906 

Jannet Austin Mrs. John R. Chambliss. Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Mary Benbow Mrs. P. Watt Richardson Greensboro, N. C. 

Stella Blount Roper, N. C. 

Willie Brown Lenoir, N. C. 

Estelle Davis Washington, N. C. 

Daisy Donnell Mrs. B. R. Craven Greensboro, N. C. 

Josie Doub Mrs. J. R. Bennett Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Carrie Glenn Gastonia, N. C. 



158 The State Normal 



Carrie Graeber Salisbury, N. C. 

May Hampton Greensboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Hicks Faison, N. C. 

Helen Hicks 1007 13th St., N. W Washington, D. C. 

Margaret Horsfield Salem, N. C. 

Sallie Hyman Hobgood, N. C. 

Meta Idles Tarboro, N. C. 

Emma McKinney Eeidsville, N. C. 

Hattie L. Martin Mrs. Odin J. Hill Mooresboro, N. C. 

Hattie O 'Berry Dudley, N. C. 

Blanche Stacy Shelby, N. C. 

Florence Terrell Mrs. James K. Dorsett. . Spencer, N. C. 

Jennie Todd Crumpler, W. Va. 

Martha E. Winfield State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1907 

Nell Armfield Statesville, N. C. 

Blanche Austin Charlotte, N. C. 

Agnes Blake Willow Creek, Montana 

Eula Blue Carthage, N. C. 

Mariam Boyd Warrenton, N. C. 

Margaret Call Mrs. James H. Thompson N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Mary G. Carter Mrs. Walter Crump .... Warrenton, N. C. 

Lina Clare Case Mrs. F. P. Ingram .... High Point, N. C. 

Janet Crump Mrs. Eugene P. Gray . . . Winston, N. C. 

Ethel Dalton Winston, N. C. 

Mena Davis Mrs. Robert McArthur . . Winston, N. C. 

Rosa Lee Dixon Hickory, N. C. 

Eleanore Elliott State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Mary Exum Snow Hill, N. C. 

Grace Gill Laurinburg, N. C. 

Florence Gray Greensboro, N. C. 

Lillian Gray Mrs. B. B. Sugg Greenville, N. C. 

Belle Hampton Greensboro, N. C. 

Winifred Harper Snow Hill, N. C. 

Lucy Hawkins Mrs. Frances E. Thomas Wadesboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Howell Asheville, N. C. 

Mabel Howell Goldsboro, N. C. 

Kate Huske Mrs. Horace Vance .... Salem, N. C. 

Mary Hyman Hobgood, N. C. 

Marjorie Kennedy Mrs. E. E. White Greensboro, N. C. 

Inez Koonce Mrs. Marvin H. Stacey . Chapel, Hill, N. C. 

Lena Leggett Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Elizabeth LeGwin Wilmington, N. C. 

Mav Lovelace Wilson, N. C. 

Ethel Lyon Raleigh, N. C. 

Elinor Murr Wadesboro, N. C. 

Mary Reid Mrs. Vernon Idol High Point, N. C. 

Janie Robinson Mrs. J. W. Pearson .... Clinton, N. C. 

Mary Robinson State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Mattie Kate Shaw Carthage, N. C. 



and Industrial College 159 



Willie Spainhour Morganton, N. C. 

Mary Strudwick Greensboro, N. C. 

Flora Thornton Mrs. Frederick Archer . . Selma, N. C. 

Mary Thorp Mrs. J. L. Home, Jr. . . . Eocky Mount, N. C. 

Mamie Toler Goldsboro, N. C. 

Lulie Whitaker Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Iola White Mrs. L. K. Thompson . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Vaughn White Mrs. Dorsey Holman . . . Rich Square, N. C. 

Sue P. Williams Mrs. B. B. Williams Warrenton, N. C. 

Daisy Wilson Mrs. E. F. Brinson (Dec 'd) 

Anna May Withers Lillington, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1908 

Catherine Arnold Cameron, N. C. 

Delha Austin Tarboro, N. C. 

Maggie Barwick Mrs. Louis D. Womble . Raleigh, N. C. 

Nettie Brogden Goldsboro, N. C. 

Ella Battle Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Ethel Brown Greensboro, N. C. 

Ida L. Byerly Yadkin College, N. C. 

Hattie Clement Mrs. W. T. Yancey Oxford, N. C. 

Loula Craven Mrs. L. A. Weddington . Concord, N. C. 

Mary Fitzgerald Greensboro, N. C. 

Alice Flintoff Mrs. J. T. Sledge R. 5, Danville, Va. 

Edna Forney Greensboro, 1ST. C. 

Elvira Foust Mrs. John O. Plonk .... Kings Mountain, N. C 

Bertie Freeman Greensboro, N. C. 

Lemma Gibbs Reidsville, N. C. 

Emma W. Gill Laurinburg, N. C. 

Lena Glenn Gastonia, N. C. 

Hattie Griffin Goldsboro, N. C. 

Blanche Hanes Mrs J. Frank Clement. . Winston, N. C. 

Ethel Hodges Mrs. A. M. McDonald . . LaGrange, N. C. 

Annie May Hunter Henderson, N. C. 

Elizabeth Hyman Hobgood, N. C. 

Bessie Ives Lee Baptist Inst., 

Pennington, Va. 

Lucy Jones Greensboro, N. C. 

Nell Jovce Danbury, N. C. 

Ethel Kelly Rich Square, N. C. 

Frances Lacy Millbrook, N. C. 

Rena Lassiter Mrs. A. V. Joyner Raleigh, N. C. 

Bettie Leary Colerain, N. C. 

Mariaima Mann Mrs. W. C. Phillips .... Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Agnes Monroe .... Mrs. F. H. Hobbs Fayetteville, N. C. 

Bright Ogburn Mrs. J. L. Hoyle Charlotte, N. C. 

Nemmie Paris Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Minnie Lee Peedin Gastonia, N. C. 

Martha T. Petty Greensboro, N. C. 

Carrie H. Powell Mrs. R. D. Smith Lester Ave., 

Oakland, Cal. 



160 The State Normal 

Etta E. Powell Whitakers/ N. C. 

Margaret Kedmond Mrs. J. Kelly Thigpen . . Charlotte, N. C. 

Janette Eudisill Mrs. E. L. Godwin Dunn, N. C. 

Sallie S. Smith Duke, N. C. 

Dora May Snipes Mrs. E. C. Mozingo .... Selma, N. C. 

Eliza Stevens Goldsboro, N. C. 

Belle Strickland Greensboro, N. C. 

Willie White Concord, N. C. 

Mary E. Williams Mooresville, N. C. 

Mattie E. Williams Greensboro, N. C. 

Frances P. Wright Shortoff, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1909 

Jean Booth Mrs. J. A. Matheson . . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Bessie Cauble Black Mountain, N. C. 

Okla Dees Grantsboro, N. C. 

Nettie Dixon Greensboro, N. C. 

Edna Duke Mrs. W. D. Johnson St. Pauls, N. C. 

Evelyn Gudger Mrs. Guy Eoberts Marshall, N. C. 

Cora Hart Gastonia, N. C. 

Paulina Hassell Edenton, N. C. 

Kate Jeffreys Goldsboro, N. C. 

Flieda Johnson Greensboro, N. C. 

Florence Landis Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Lola Lasley Burlington, N. C. 

Mary B. Mitchell State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Hal Morrison Statesville, N. C. 

Velna Pope Mrs. H. L. Land Hamlet, N. C. 

Linda Shuford Mrs. C. E. Mcintosh . . . Ealeigh, N. C. 

Clara Sloan Mrs. John B. Eankin . . Gastonia, N. C. 

Jessie Smoak Mrs. B. B. Pharr Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Claude Umstead Eougemont, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1910 

Belle Avera Andrews Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Louise Brown Chadbourn, N. C. 

Bessie Durand Coats Smithfield, N. C. 

Margaret Ellen Cooper Graham, N. C. 

Mellie M. Cotchett Wilmington, N. C. 

Annie Dent Davis Greensboro, N. C. 

Lula John Dixon Mrs. W. H. Meroney . . Murphy, N. C. 

Mamie Barnes Griffin Wilson, N. C. 

Annie Lee Harper Wadesboro, N. C. 

Edith Hassell E. 2, Edenton, N. C. 

Belle Hicks Henderson, N. C. 

Harriet Eleanor Huske Fayetteville, N. C. 

Emilie Slade Hyman Hobgood, N. C. 

Margaret Warren John Fayetteville, N. C. 

Viola Keeter Mrs. Joseph Wharton . . Greenwood, S. C. 

Katie Kime Greensboro, N. C. 



and Industrial College 161 



Clara Irene Lambe Mrs. E. B. Craven Eaeford, N. C. 

Alice Cordelia Ledbetter Greensboro, N. C. 

Mary McCulloch Greensboro, N. C. 

Winnie E. McWhorter Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Annie Laurie Martin. . . . Mrs. E. W. Cole Carnegie, Pa. 

Edith Mason Stanley, N. C. 

Annie Moring Asheboro, N. C. 

Annette Claypole Munds Mrs. Walter M. Kenly. . Easton, Md. 

Frances Willard Powers Canton, N. C. 

Eunice Hall Eoberts Fort Valley, Ga. 

Pearl Eobertson 1915 14th St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

Elizabeth Eobinson Fayetteville, N. C. 

Clyde Stancill Mrs. Judson Blount .... Bethel, N. C. 

Marion Lee Stevens Goldsboro, N. C. 

Jane Summerell State Normal College . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Anna Glenn Vernon Wake Forest, N. C. 

Nora Belle Wilson Charlotte, N. C. 

Louise Wooten Mrs. S. E, Griffin Nashville, N. C. 

Laura Barbara Weill . . . Mrs. David Stern Greensboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1911 

Lily May Batterham Asheville, N. C. 

Eleanor Eose Batterham Asheville, N. C. 

Bessie Bennett Eeidsville, N. C. 

Mary Leta Berry Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Antoinette Black Wilmington, N. C. 

Frances Bryan Broadfoot Mrs. Jesse H. Claypoole New Bern, N. C. 

Annie Goodloe Brown Vaughan, N. C. 

Bonnie Mae Brown Tarboro, N. C. 

Mary Olivia Burbage Como, N. C. 

Nora Carpenter Brown Summit, N. C 

Bertha Daniel E. 5, Eoxboro, N. C. 

Jessie Earnhardt Box 106 

Key West, Fla. 

Catherine Ervin Morganton, N. C. 

Georgie Hicks Faison Clinton, N. C. 

Margaret J. Faison Clinton, N. C. 

Lena Green Monroe, N. C. 

Zora Hannah Thomasville, N. C. 

Pearl Holloway Gorman, N. C. 

Myrtle B. Johnson Mrs. L. E. Hassell Eoper, N. C. 

Catherine H. Jones Durham, N. C. 

Marea Jordan Statesville, N. C. 

Zannie Koonce Chadbourn, N. O. 

Nannie Lacy Millbrook, N. C. 

Edith Latham Mrs. A. C. Settan 40 Massachusetts Ave., 

Quincy, Mass. 

Minnie Littman Salisbury, N. C. 

Adelaide Morrow Mebane, N. C. 

Katherine Norfleet Eoxobel, N. C. 



162 The State Normal 



Natalie Nunn Kinston, N. C. 

Allie Parsons Wilson, N. C. 

Margaret Pickett Mrs. J. J. Hamlin High Point, N. C. 

Huldah Slaughter Goldsboro, N. C. 

Delorah Stepp Hendersonville, N. C. 

Ada Viele Lexington, N. C. 

May Vickery Mrs. Jarvis Faucette . . . Brown Summit, N. C. 

Mary Olive Walters Hertford, N. C. 

Harriet C. Wardlaw Greensboro, N. C. 

Lelia White Henderson, N. C. 

Annie Louise Wills Brinkleyville, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1912 

Ivor Aycock Fremont, N. C. 

Margaret Kollock Berry Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Leah Boddie Durham, N. C. 

Mary Katherine Brown Salisbury, N. C. 

Jamie Bryan High Point, N. C. 

Hattie E. Burch Andrews, N. C. 

Elizabeth N. Burwell Greenville, N. C. 

Claudia Cashwell Gastonia, N. C. 

Annie Moore Cherry Dunn, N. C. 

Dora Coats Eeidsville, N. C. 

Margaret Cameron Cobb 208 London St., 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Madge Coble Pomona, 1ST. C. 

Maggie Linda Coble Greensboro, N. C. 

Annie Franklin Cummins 1515 Floyd Ave., 

Eichmond, Va. 
Mary Fay Davenport Wellesley College, 

Wellesley, Mass. 

Grace Elizabeth Eaton Eeidsville, N. C. 

Lucile Marshall Elliott Salisbury, 1ST. C. 

Clyde Fields Amelia, N. C. 

Nettie Jane Flemming Greensboro, N. C. 

Eebecca Hilliard Foust Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Louise North Gill Mrs. A. B. Bynum Laurinburg, N. C. 

May Green Winston, N. C. 

Myrtle Green Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Lucy Hamilton Atlantic, N. C. 

Alice Gill Harris Statesville, N. C. 

Eebecca Ashf ord Herring Clinton, N. C. 

Hattie Sherrod Howell Tarboro, N. C. 

Florence Eebecca Hunt Oxford, N. C. 

Hazel Hunt Eich Square, N. C. 

Ethel Lillian Ivey Hamlet, N. C. 

Mabel Gerding Jetton Shelby, N. C. 

Margaret E. Johnson Salisbury, N. C. 

Ara Virginia Jordan Littleton, N. C. 

Bessie Jordan Mrs. Claude S. Tate .... Dunn, N. C. 

Amy E. Joseph Goldsboro, N. C. 



and Industrial College 163 



Lucy Landon Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Louise Lucas Andrews, N. C. 

Ethel McNairy Statesville, N. C. 

Lueile Middleton Lenoir, N. C. 

Alice Tye Morrison Louisburg, 1ST. C. 

Kate Lea Owen Gastonia, N. C. 

Mary K. Van Poole Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Lucy Belle Robertson High Point, N. C. 

Harriette Ethel Skinner Rich Square, N. C. 

Mary Slaughter Goldsboro, N. C. 

Katie Norma Smith Dunn, N. C. 

Thelma Smith Wilmington, N. C. 

Pattie Louise Spruill Oriental, N. C. 

Kate Richardson Styron Wilmington, N. C. 

Sarah McEwen Tulbert Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Catherine E. Vernon Wake Forest, N. C. 

Emma Vickery Rutherf ordton, N. C. 

Alice Iva Whitson R. 2, Asheville, N. C. 

Margaret Rebecca Wilson Wilson, N. C. 

Penelope Witherington Goldsboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1913 

Eula Beatrice Alexander Andrews, N. C. 

Maude Huntley Beatty Kinston, N. C. 

Hazel Lueile Black Wilmington, N. C. 

Ethel Condo Bollinger Asheville, N. C. 

Lura Savannah Brogden Marion, N". C. 

Clara Booth Byrd Greensboro, N. C. 

Lueile Cavenaugh Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary Elizabeth Craig Greenville, N. C. 

Louise Wood Crawford Goldsboro, N. C. 

Lillian Gorham Crisp Rich Square, N. C. 

Ruth Deans Wilson, N. C. 

Martha Hicks Faison Faison, N. C. 

Gertrude Griffin Goldsboro, N. C. 

lone Holt Grogan Greenville, N. C. 

Huldah Groome Pomona, N. C. 

Jane Ruth Groome Pomona, N. C. 

Meriel Everett Groves Albemarle, 1ST. C. 

Sallie Lorena Gudger . . . (Deceased) Asheville, N". C. 

Mildred Harrington Carthage, N. C. 

Florence L. Hildebrand Marion, N. C. 

Myrtle Horney R. 4, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Verta Louise Idol Wilson, N. C. 

Florence Jeff ress Canton, N. C. 

Nell B. Johnston Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Eva Jordan Murphy, N. C. 

Marianna Poisson Justice Wadesboro, N. C. 

Ethel Keeter Grover, N. C. 

Rachel Susan Lynch Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Margaret Watson Mann Swan Quarter, N. C. 



164 The State Normal 



Corinna LeMay Mial Kinston, N. C. 

Florence Eva Mitchell Oxford, N. C. 

Hattie Yetta Motzno Selma, N. C. 

Ivey Henrietta Paylor Greensboro, N. C. 

Isabel Pierson Enfield, N. C. 

Alice Walker Phelps Plymouth, N. C. 

Mary Gilmer Porter Franklinton, N. C. 

Mildred Eankin Gastonia, N". C. 

Sadie Lillian Eice Eeidsville, N. C. 

Kathrine McD. Eobinson Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lizzie Jeffrey Eoddick Eich Square, N. C. 

Christine Blair Eutledge Mt. Holly, N. C. 

Minnie Gaston Somers Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Pattie Glenn Spurgeon Lucama, N. C. 

Grace Caroline Stanford Eich Square, N. C. 

Sallie McKenzie Sumner Lenoir, N. C. 

Gretchen Arnold Taylor Greensboro, N". C. 

Mary Alice Tennent Greensboro, N. C. 

Carrie Mclnnis Toomer ■'. . Nashville, N. C. 

Annie Penelope Whitty Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Anna Littlepage Williams Greensboro, N. C. 



and Industrial College 165 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



THE CURRICULUM 

Mr. Smith, Miss Mendenhall, Miss Boddie, Mr. Brown 



SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
Mr. Matheson, Mr. Jackson, Miss Petty, Miss Hill 



COLLEGE CREDIT 

Miss Bryan, Miss Strong 



SUMMER SESSION 
Mr. Smith, Mr. Matheson, Miss Long 



ENTERTAINMENTS (Students) 
Mrs. Sharpe (Chairman) 



EXTENSION WORK 

Miss Petty, Mr. Balcomb, Miss Jamison, Miss Eaines 



CATALOGUE AND COLLEGE BULLETDTS 

Mr. Smith (Chairman) 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE— Y. W. C. A. 

Mr. Merritt, Miss Coit, Miss Daniel 



166 The State Normal 

advisory committee— magazine 

Miss Winfield 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE— CAROLINIAN 

Mr. Jackson, Miss Winfield 



ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE 
Mr. Brown, Mrs. Sharpe, Miss Jamison 



COMMITTEE ON PARK 
Dr. Gudger, Mr. Balcomb 



COMMITTEE ON CAMPUS 
Mr. Hammel, Miss Fort 



ARRIVAL OP STUDENTS 
Mr. Brockmann, Mr. Brown, Dr. Gudger 



DEPARTURE OF STUDENTS 

Mr. Forney, Mr. Merritt, Mr. Hammel 



INDEX 

Accredited Schools Committee 165 

Admission of Students 21 

To Freshman Class 21-30 

To Advanced Standing 33 

To Music Course 30 

Agriculture. See Eural Economics 82 

Alumnae Association 121 

Alumnae Loan Funds 100 

* ' Alumnae News" 120 

Anatomy, Comparative 58 

Appointments, County 92 

Appropriations, Annual 20 

Art, Domestic 81 

Arts, Manual, Department of 61 

Association, Young Women's Christian 117 

Bacteriology, Household 78 

Bailey Scholarship 101 

Bible Classes 118 

Biology, Courses in 56 

Board of Directors 8 

Boarding Arrangement 92 and 114 

Places in the Dormitories 92 

Bookkeeping 89 

Botany, Course in 56 

Buildings 105 

Bulletin, College 119 

Business Courses. See Commercial Department. 

Buxton Loan Fund 100 

Bynum Loan Fund 101 

Calendars 6-7 

Carr Loan Fund 100 

Chemistry, Courses in 58 

Chemistry, Household 59 and 79 

Choir, College 76 

Churches, Greensboro. See Eeligious Life 109 

Clubs, Extension Department 's service to 90 

College, History of Establishment 18 

Value of Plant 20 

Publications 119 

Purpose and Organization of 19 

Equipment 105-108 

Location and Advantages 104 

Service of to State 112 

Some Distinctive Features of 115 

Commencement Exercises, 1913 147 



INDEX— Continued 

Commercial Department 85 

Certificates of 87 

Correspondence, Courses in 88 

Expenses of 89 

Syllabus of Work in 87 

Committees of Faculty 165 

Concerts and Lectures 110 

Contract 102 

Cooking. See Domestic Science 78 

Cottage, Home-Training 80 

County Appointments 93 

County, Enrollment 145 

Courses of Instruction 43-91 

Courses of Study 34 

Leading to Degrees 34-39 

Brief, for Teachers 40 

Summer Session 41 

Business 86 

For Nurses 40 

For Students not Candidates for Degrees 40-41 

Regulations concerning 34 

Culture, Physical 68 

General 110 

Religious 109 

Curriculum Committee 165 

Daniels Loan Fund 100 

Daughters of Confederacy Scholarship 101 

Degrees 34 

Course leading to Bachelor of Pedagogy 35 

to Bachelor of Arts 36 

to Bachelor of Science 37 

to Bachelor of Music 38 

to Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 39 

Conferred in 1913 148 

Departments of Instruction 43-91 

Directions, Important 17 

Directors, Board of 8 

Discipline. See Government 102 

Domestic Art, Department of 81 

Domestic Science, Department of 78 

Dormitories 92 and 106 

Drawing, Department of 77 

Dressmaking 81 

Economics. See History, Course IV, page 53. 

Economics, Home, Course in 79 

Course allowing special attention to 39 

Rural, Department of 82 



INDEX— Continued 

Education, Courses in 43-47 

Elective Courses 40 

Elocution. See Expression 51 

English, Courses in 47-50 

Admission Eequirements in 24-26 

Ensemble Playing 74 

Entrance Eequirements 21-30 

Equipment 105-108 

Examinations, Entrance 22-30 

Times and Places of 32 

For Advanced Standing 33 

For County Appointments 93 

Eeports of and Grades 103 

Expenses 95-98 

Expression, Courses in 51 

Extension Department 90 

Extension Work 90 and 113 

Faculty 9-14 

Standing Committees of 165 

Features of College 115 

Fees. See Expenses 95-97 

Laboratory Fees 97 

Lecture and' Eecital Fee 110 

Fellowships 100 

Free Tuition Agreement 99 

French, Courses in 64 

Entrance Eequirements in 29 

Gardening. See Eural Economics 82 

Geometry. See Mathematics. 

German, Courses in 66 

Entrance Eequirements 30 

Government 102 

Graduates, List of 150 

Graduating Class, 1913 148 

Greensboro, Educational Center 104 

Accessibility of 105 

Grounds and Buildings 105 

Gymnasium Outfit 17 and 97 

Health and Medical Attention 113 

History and Economics, Courses in 52 

Entrance Eequirements 23 

Home Economics, Course leading to Degree 39 

Home-Service Department 91 

Home-Training Cottage 80 

House Furnishing and Decoration. See Manual Arts ... 61 

Housekeeper 's Courses 79-80 

Hygiene, Course in 67 



INDEX— Continued 

Ideas for which the College Stands 4 

Important Directions 17 

Infirmary. See Equipment 107 

Information, General 104 

Institute for Teachers. See Summer Session. 
Institution. See College. 

Instruction, Departments of 43-91 

Courses of. See English, History, etc. 

Laboratories. See Equipment 106 

Laboratory Fees 97 

Languages. See Latin, French, German. 

Entrance Eequirements in 27-28 

Latin, Courses in 63 

Entrance Eequirements 28 

Lecture and Recital Course 110 

Library 106 and 108 

Literary Societies 116 

Loan Funds 100 

Mclver, Founder of College 18 

Mclver Loan Fund 100 

Macy Loan Fund 101 

Magazine, State Normal 120 

Mahler Fund 101 

Manual Arts, Department of 61 

Mathematics, Courses in 54 

Entrance Eequirements 23 

Medical Attention 113 

Mission Classes 118 

Music Department 69-72 

Theoretical 70-73 

Applied 72 

Public School 71 

Piano 72 

Violin 73 

Organ 73 

Voice Culture 73 

Course recommended for preparation 31 

Course allowing Special Attention to 38 

Expenses of 97-98 

Admission Eequirements 30 

Music Supplies 76 

Graduation Eequirements 74 

Non-Eesidents — Tuition Charges 97 

Nurses, Course for 40 

Officers of Institution 15 

Opening, Date of 7 

Orchestra, College 76 



INDEX— Continued 

Organ, Course in 73 

Organizations 116 

Literary Societies 116 

Christian Association 117 

Student, Pay-Day of 119 

Patronage, Scope of 146 

Pay-Day for Student Organizations 119 

Pedagogy, Courses in 43-47 

Degree Course allowing Special Attention to ... . 35 

Physical Geography, Entrance 27 

Physical Training . . . 68 

Physics, Courses in - 60 

Physiography, Course in 58 

Physiology 67 

Piano. See Music. 

Psychology 44-45 

Practice and Observation School. See Training School 44 

Publications, College 119 

Public School Music 71 

Beading and Elocution. See Expression 51 

Eeading Eoom. See Library. 

Eecitals, Artist and Faculty 75 

Student 75 

Eegistry, Teachers ' 120 

Eegulations, Course of Study 34 

Eeligious Life 109 and 117 

Eeport of Board of Health 114 

Eeporting, Course in 86 

Eeports, Examinations 103 

Eequirements for Admission 21-30 

Eouss Loan Fund 101 

Eural Economics, Department of 82 

Sanitation, Household 79 

School Gardening. See Eural Economics 82 

Science, Course leading to Bachelor of 37 and 39 

Science, Domestic 78 

Science, Entrance Eequirements in 27 

Service of College 112 

Sewing. See Domestic Art 81 

Shorthand 85 

Suggested Courses in 86 

Home Study Course 88 

Syllabus of Work 87 

Social Life 109 

Societies, Literary 116 

Solo Class 75 

Special Courses, Expenses of 97 

Spirit of the Institution Ill 



INDEX— Continued 

Statistics, Scope of Patronage 146 

Stenography. See Shorthand 85 

Students, List of J 22 

Interesting Table of Statistics 146 

Summary by Counties 145 

Summer Session 41 

Teachers, Brief Course for 40 

Summer Institute for 42 

Training School for 44 

Teachers ' Registry .• . . . 120 

Text-books 98 

Textiles. See Domestic Art 82 

Training, Physical 68 

Training School for Teachers 44 

Tuition, Charges. See Expenses 95-98 

Free 99 

Agreement Required 99 

Typewriting 88 

Units, Entrance Requirements in 22 

Vaccination, Required 17 

Violin, Course in 73 

Voice Culture 73 

Young Women 's Christian Association 117